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DREW L RAF ™ 



257062 



Index to 



TOGETHER is a monthly 
family magazine published 
by The Methodist Publish- 
ing House. It continues 
The Christian Advocate, 
established in 1826. 



TOGETHER MAGAZINE 

740 Rush Street, Chicago 11, Illinois 

Volume III — from January 1959 to December 1959, inclusive 



KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS 



Ag 


August 


Ap 


April 


biog 


biography 


comp 


compiler 


D 


December 


diag 


diagram 


ed 


editor 


F 


February 


ha 


Hobby Alley 


il 


illustrated 


Ja 


January 


Je 


June 


Jl 


July 


lse 


Little Lessons in Spiritual Efficiency 


Mr 


March 


My 


May 


N 


November 


ns 


news 


O 


October 


Pt 


Personal Testimony 


pcm 


People Called Methodists 


pctl 


pictorial 


por 


portrait 


pw 


Powwow, Midmonth 


re 


Reader's Choice 


S 


September 


th 


Together in the Home 


tr 


translator 


tsf 


Together with the Small Fry 


urn 


Unusual Methodists 



ADAMS, JAMES T. 

The American dream, re por 20-21 N 
ADAMS, SAMUEL HOPKINS 

Tenderloin, rev 56 Ap 
ADMINISTRATION 

See Church administration 
AFRICA 

Africa races to freedom, ns 69-70 Je 
African quartet tours U. S. ns 66 Ag 
African report. G. Kennedy 56-57 Je 
Portrait of an African artist. B. Simonsson 

pctl 2-3 My 
Urges U.S. aid to Africa, ns 69 Ap 
Witnesses to the end of the earth. Mrs. J. F. 
Tillman por 13 S 
AGE AND AGING 

Colorado pushes care of aged, ns 71 S 
Concern for aged needed, ns 115-116 N 
Oldsters want activities, ns 65 Ja 

See also 
Grandparents 
AKERS, MILBURN P. 

Participant in Should church-related colleges 
have wide-open doors? pw por 32-34 S 
AITKENS, KATE 

Making Your Living Is Fun. rev 56 Ag 
ALASKA 

Churches eye Alaska's laws, ns 71 My 
First Mrs. Alaska is Methodist, ns 69 O 
Methodism's stake in the newest state, pctl 

map 35-42 Ja 
Salmon fisherman at work, cover Ja 
ALBION COLLEGE 

Don't be afraid of art. R. C. Underwood 
pctl ha 76-79 S 
ALBRIGHT, WILLIAM F. 

John the Baptist — today, por biog 21-22 Je 
ALCOHOLISM 

Alcoholism is becoming another headache for 

France. R. Tunley il 33 F 
Help for the alcoholic. E. W. Palmer, il 35 O 
New light on alcoholics ; seminar sponsored 
by Board of Temperance, ns 67 F 
See also 
Liquor 
ALEXANDER, CECIL FRANCES 

All things bright and beautiful, il tsf 61 Ag 
ALEXANDER, MRS. C. M. 

Springtime, poem il tsf 61 Ap 
ALGERIA 

Algeria : where crescent meets cross, il 15 Ap 
My 40 days and nights with the Algerian 
rebels. L. E. Griffith il 12 Ap 
ALLEN, FRANCES FOWLER 

The Sunday I forgot my glasses, il 31 Ap 
ALLEN, MEL and Graham, Frank, Jr. 

It Takes Heart, rev 52 Ag 
ALLOWANCES 

See Children's allowances 
ALMANACK, METHODIST 

See each issue Ja through O 
AMRINE, MICHAEL 

The Great Decision, rev 54 Je 
ANDERSON, FLAVIA 

The Rebel Emperor, rev 52 Ag 



ANDERSON, MARGARET 

Cake is to eat. (Working at home) il th 28- 
29 Mr 
ANDERSON, WILLIAM A. 

When the wise man appeared, re il 30-31 D 
ANGLE, PAUL 

(ed) The American Reader, rev 52 Ap 
ANNIVERSARIES, CHURCH 

Centennials everywhere, ns 112 N 
ANNUAL CONFERENCES 

Annual conferences tackle vital issues, ns 

71 Ag 

Fillmore portrays 1818 circuit rider, por ns 

72 S 

Our preachers, a parody on Annual Confer- 
ences, pctl 25-27 Mr 
Tackle family, community issues, ns 72 S 
ANTARCTIC 

Worship at South Pole, ns 72 My 
ANTHONY, KATHARINE 

First Lady of the Revolution, rev 55 Mr 
ANTRIM, DORON K. 

Hymns to live by: A Mighty Fortress Is Our 

God. 46 O 
Hymns to live by : O Little Town of Bethle- 
hem, il 62 D 
ARBOR DAY 

Arbor Day. G. Wood il 38-39 Ap 
ARCHAEOLOGY 

Gomorrah located ? ns 73 D 
ARCHITECTURE 

See Church Architecture 
ARMOUR, ANOBEL 

A boy and his hymnbook. il 51 S 
ARMOUR, RICHARD 

Slim picking, poem 55 Mr 
ART 

Christ by Sallman : Two more views, pctl 

2-3 O 
Don't be afraid of art. R. C. Underwood ha 

pctl 76-79 S 
God is our refuge. G. Rowe pctl 125 N 
Nativity scenes, pctl 38-44 D 
ART OF LIVING 

See Conduct of Life 
ARTISTS 

See individual artist 
ASBURY, FRANCIS 

Asbury in anecdotes, il por 38-41 N 

Francis Asbury : America's first bishop, cover 

N 
1789-1959 history repeats, pctl 14-15 N 
ASTRONOMY 

Star gazing: an easy lesson. H. J. Clinebell, 
Jr. ha il 65-67 O 
ATKINSON, B. M.. JR. 

What Dr. Spock Didn't Tell Us: A Survival 
Kit for Parents, rev il 54 Ag 
AUSTRIA 

Happy hours for Franz und Gretchen. (kin- 
dergarten at Linz, Austria) pctl 74-77 Ja 
AUTOMOBILES 

Ever drive a horseless carriage? il ha 57-59 
Ag 
AVERY. MARJORIE W. 

Participant in Flowers and funerals, pw 
22-24 Ag 
AXELROD, HERBERT R. and Vorderwinkler, 
William 
Tropical Fish in Your Home, rev 53 Jl 



BABIES 

Battalions of babies. M. Mack il 17-19 Je 
See also 

Children 
BACH, MARCUS 

God and the Soviets, rev 54 Mr 
BAILEY, BERNADINE and Walworth, 
Dorothy 

'He loved me truly.' (Sara Bush Lincoln) il 
re 24-27 F 
BAKER, JOHN NEWTON 

Your Public Relations Are Showing, rev 51 
Mr 
BAKER, THOMAS H. 

Meditation, por 50-51 My 
BALCOMB, RAYMOND E. 

Meditation, por 50 Ag 
BALTIMORE 

Lovely Lane church, pctl 37-38 Je 
BAPTISM 

For of such is the kingdom . . . pctl 1 Ap 
BARBOUR, RICHMOND 

Teens Together. See each issue 
BARCLAY, DOROTHY 

Understanding the City Child, rev 54 My 



BARKER, GEORGE 

Shall we tell our children we're ex-convicts? 
G. Shelby as told to G. Barker il pw 28-30 
Je 
BARNABUS 

See Looks at New Books in each issue. 
BARTH, JOHN 

The End of the Road, rev 55 Ja 
BARTH, KARL 

A Protestant Thought : From Rousseau to 
Ritschl. rev 53 D 
BARTH, MARKUS 

Score Sunday schools, ns 69 My 
BARUCH, BERNARD M. 

There are no short cuts to peace. B. " 
Baruch as told to A. E. Johnson 14-16 
por il S 
BAUMGARTNER, WALTER J. 

City-wide musician, um por 32 D 
BEAUMONT, CHARLES and Nolan, William 

(Comp Omnibus of Speed, rev 54 Mr 
BECK, DO 

Lesson for the living. E. Beck as told to 
J. Huntsinger por pt 11 Ja 
BEECROFT, JOHN and Costain, Thomas B. 

(ed) More Stories to Remember. 58 O 
BEHZAD, AGHA 

Nativity scene, pctl 43 D 
BELFRAGE, SALLY 

A Room in Moscow, rev 55 Ag 
BELL, GINA M. 

The blue-nosed cat. il tsf 58-59 Mr 
BELLOW, SAUL 

Henderson, the Rain King, rev 56 Ag 
BELLS 

These bells ring out. R. C. Underwood pctl 
63-65 D 
BENNARD, GEORGE 

Dedicate 'Old Rugged Cross.' ns 74 Je 
Song for the ages : "The Old Rugged Cross." 
por 52 Ja 
BERMUDA 

Bermuda, land of lilies, pctl 74-76 Mr 
BERRY, ROMEYN 

Grandmother's legacy, (hollyhocks) pctl 76-78 
My 
BERTOCCI, PETER A. 

Religion as Creative Insecurity, rev 51 Ap 
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS (periodical) 

Garden Ideas, rev 52 Jl 
BIBLE 

Bible study by television, pctl 62-65 S 
Garden of Eden located? ns 71 Ap 
BIBLE, NEW TESTAMENT 

The Verona Testament, rev 49 Ap 
BIBLE (REVISED STANDARD VERSION 
REFERENCE) 
52 O 
BIGBEE, NORTH 

Miracle millions for the mustangs, por 17-19 
Ag 
BILLINGTON, RAY A. 

A letter to the editor that got unexpected 
results, il por 46-48 N 
BIRDS 

Plan a party — just for birds, il tsf 57 Ja 
BIRTH CONTROL 

See Planned Parenthood 
BISHOPS 

Council reaffirms support of Methodist Social 

Creed, ns 67 Ja 
'Don't limit terms.' ns 67 D 
Elect Bishop Marvin A. Franklin president 

of Council of Bishops, ns 11 Je 
Ike, bishops and history, ns 68-69 Je 
New bishops to be elected in 1960. ns 70 Jl 
New Episcopal assignments, ns 114 N 
Proclamation, por 86 N 

Message from the Council of Bishops. 31 Mr 
Urge draft study, ns 9 F 
BLACK, LEE 

All Men Are Murderers, rev 56 F 
BLANTON, SMILEY and Gordon, Arthur 
What to do with aging parents, il 14-16 Jl 
BLIND 

Blind need more teachers, ns 69 Je 

I give my eyes to the blind. J. Samuel il ha 

60-62 Mr 
The red wagon. L. Ware il re 21-22 Ap 
BLIVEN, BRUCE, JR. 

The American Revolution, rev 51 F 
BLOSSOM, VIRGIL T. 

It Has Happened Here, rev 54 S 
BLUM, JOHN MORTON 

Yesterday's Children, rev 52 D 
BOLIVIA 

Bolivia — a land of decision, pctl 35-42 F 



More Bolivian members in Sunday-school, 
ns 72 Mr 
BOMBINGS 

See Terrorism 
BONHAM, EUGENE H. 
Meditation, por 50 Ag 
BOOK LISTS 

Better for young eyes than TV. 51 F 

Books for your crater, alligator ; for sheer 

enjoyment. 51 Mr 
For people with roving soles . . . (travel) 

53 My 

Let's make the Bible come alive ! 53 D 
Sightseeing in United States, il 53 Je 
Successors to the circuit riders ; books about 
ministers. 50 Ja 
BOOK REVIEWS 

Abandon Ship ! 50 Mr 

Adventures in Parenthood. 55 Ag 

Adventurers for God. 58 D 

All about Tropical Fish. 56 O 

All in One Lifetime. 62 F 

All Men Are Murderers. 56 F 

The Amazing Results of Positive Thinking. 

54 D 

American Heritage Book of Great Historic 

Places. 53 Je 
American Heritage Book of The Revolution. 

50 Mr 

The American High School Today. 53 My 

The American Reader. 52 Ap 

The American Revolution. 51 F 

And Four to Grow on. 56 S 

Angkor. 52 O 

The Angry Scar. 56 My 

Animals in India, il 50 F 

Antarctic Assault. 52 Jl 

Antarctic Scout. 56 S 

Anthropologist at Work. 53 Je 

The Apron Pocket Book of Meditation and 

Prayer, rev 53 Mr / 

The Atlantic Book of British and \ imerican 

Poetry. 53 Mr 
Around the World in 1000 Pictures. 53 My 
The Audubon Book of True Nature Stories. 

51 Ap 

Ben-Gurion, The Biography of an Extraor- 
dinary Man. 66 My 

Better Homes & Gardens Garden Ideas. 63 Jl 

Beyond a Big Mountain. 53 O 

Billy Graham. 50 Ja 

A Book of Family Worship. 54 D 

The Book of Negro Folklore. 54 Ap 

Brainwashing in the High Schools. 52 My 

Breakdown. 55 Ag 

Brotherhood of Evil : The Mafia. 52 Je 

Bumper Crop. 56 My 

Business and Religion. 56 D 

The Caesars. 56 Jl 

The Career of an Improbable Rascal. 62 Jl 

A Case History of Hope. 53-54 Je 

Christ and the Fine Arts. 53 Ag 

The Christian and Military Service. 55 Ap 

Christian Family Living. 54 My 

Christian Ethics. 51 Ap 

Chronicle of a Generation. 52 Je 

The Church and Medical Missions. 56 D 

Codfish, Cats and Civilization. 52 O 

Coin Collectors Guide, rev ed 54-55 Ap 

Coinometry. rev ed 54-55 Ap 

Collected Essays of Aldous Huxley. 54 D 

Collision Course. 53 Ag 

The Communist World and Ours. 54 My 

The Complete Guide to Indoor Plants. 63 Jl 

The Comprehensive Word Guide. 54 Ja 

The Confederate Invasion of New Mexico and 
Arizona 1861-1862. 51 Ap 

Confessions of Mrs. Smith. 51 F 

The Creative Years. 54 Je 

Cricket Smith. 57 Jl 

The Crossing of Antarctica. 52 Jl 

The Crown and the Cross. 57 Jl 

D-Day, the Sixth of June, 1944. 52 D 

Daughter of the Gold Rush. 52 F 

Day before Yesterday: the Reminiscences of 
Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. por 54 O 

The Day I Was Proudest to be an American. 

52 Ja 

Decade in Europe. 66 D 

Depart This Life. 56 F 

Dining Out in Any Language. 53 My 

Discovering Nature. 61 F 

Doctor Zhivago. 59 F 

Don't Get Perconel With a Chicken, rev 66 Jl 

The Dragon's Seed. 66 S 

The Dress Doctor. 56 Jl 

East to West. 53 My 

Egypt in Transition. 53 O 

Elm St. Politics. 56 S 

The End of the Road. 55 Ja 

Endurance. 52 Ag 

The Enemy Camp. 55 Ja 

Enjoying America's Gardens. 53 Je 

Exodus. 56 Ap 

Exploring the Himalaya. 52-53 Mr 

The Family Legal Adviser. 63 Jl 

The Family Quarrel. 55 S 

Fidel Castro. 54 Ag 

Fire at Sea : the Story of the Morro Castle. 

53 Ag 

First Easter il 54 Je 

First Folio. 52 D 

First Lady of the Revolution. 55 Mr 

Five Ideas That Change the World. 53 O 

The Flame Trees of Thika. 53 D 

The Flight of the Dancing Bear. 59 D 

For the Life of Me. 49 Ap 

For 24 Plain. 52 O 

The Fossil Book. 56 Jl 



Four Tragedies. 55 S 

Freest Man on Earth. 67 Mr 

The Freudian Ethic. 58 D 

Friend to Friend. 51-52 Mr 

Friends and Enemies. 55 Ag 

G. O. Fizzickle Pogo. 54 F 

Germany and the East- West Crisis : The De- 
cisive Challenge to American Policy. 53 O 

Give Me a Ship to Sail. 53 Ag 

God and the Soviets. 54 Mr 

God in My Life, il 54 Jl 

God, Sex and Youth. 54 Ag 

Gold in California. 51 F 

Gold in Your Attic. 54 Je 

The Golden Coast, il 52 Je 

The Gospel in Dispute. 51 Ap 

Grand Canyon ; Today and All Its Yesterdays. 
53 Je 

The Great Chicago Fire. 56 My 

The Great Decision. 64 Je 

The Great Sioux Uprising. 52 Jl 

Great Stories from the World of Sport. 
50-51 Mr 

The Great West. 50, 52 Ja 

The Greatest Gamblers. 56 S 

Greece. 53 My 

Green Grows Ivy. 54 Mr 

Green Pastures. 56 Ag 

Growing Up. 56 Ag 

The Growth of Physical Science. 55 S 

A Guide to Early American Homes I Soul hi 
53 Je 

The Heart Is the Teacher. 54-55 Mr 

Heaven in the Home. 54 O 

History of the Modern World. 4v 50 F 

The Holy Barbarians. 63 O 

An Honest Preface. 55 Ag 

How the Church Can Help Where Delin- 
quency Begins. 52 F 

How to Housebreak and Train Your Dog. 

53 Jl 

How to Remove the Cotton from a Bottle 

of Aspirin, il 59 S 
The Huckster's Revenge. 54 Je 
I Believe in Man. 56 D 
I Believe in the Church. 56 D 
The Idea of a College. 53 D 
If the Churches Want World Peace. 51 Ap 
Illustrations from Biblical Archaeology, por 

54 S 

I'm All Right, Jack. 58 S 

In Every War But One. 53 Je 

In Holy Matrimony. 54 My 

The Ineas of Pedro de Cieza de Leon. 64 O 

Indians and Other Americans. 66 Ag 

Invitation to Commune. 56 Je 

I Remember. 54 D 

Islam — the Straight Path. 55 Ag 

It Has Happened Here. 54 S 

It's God, Help Me Understand. 54 Jl 

It Takes Heart. 52 Ag 

Jedediah Smith, Trail Blazer of the West. 

53 O 
John D. Rockefeller. 56 
John Paul Jones, a Sailor's Biography. 53 D 
Jonathan Prentiss Dolliver. 54 My 
The Journal and Letters of Francis Asbury. 

il 52 My 
Journey to Poland and Yugoslavia. 53 O 
Journey to the Beginning. 54 D 
Kent Cooper and the Associated Press. 54 A g 
Labor, U.S.A. 54 D 
Lady L. 57 Jl 

The Language of Dissent. 56 O 
The Last Nine Days of the Bismarck. 53 Ag 
The Layman's Bible Commentary. 54 D 
Let No Man Write My Epitaph. 57 Mr 
Lewis and Clark, Explorers to the West. 56 D 
The Life and Death of the Duchess. 53 Ag 
The Life of Sir Alexander Fleming. 54 D 
Light in the Jungle. 55 S 

The Lincoln Library of Essential Informa- 
tion. 54 O 
The Little World of Laos. 56 Ag 
Living Birds of the World. 54 Ag 
Living in State. 54 Jl 
The Living of These Days, rev 50 Ja 
Lolita. 56 F 

The Long Arm of Lee. 54 D 
The Long Dream. 58 My 
The Long Road to Humanity. 58 D 
Look Back in Love. 59 S 
Looking up. 52 Ag 
Madame de Lafayette. 54 D 
Mahatma Gandhi, il 52 Jl 
Mainstreams of Modern Art. 58 D 
Making Your Living Is Fun. 56 Ag 
The Man Who Was Don Quixote, il 52 Ap 
Man's First Love. 54 Ja 
The Marauders. 52 D 
The March of Conquest. 52 F 
The Marks of Christian Education. 52 Ap 
The Marquis de Lafayette: Bright Sword for 

Freedom. 51 F 
Marx Meets Christ. 51 Ap 
The Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls. 55 S 
The Memoirs of Colonel John S. Mosby. 

52-53 Jl 
The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Montgomery. 

49 Ja 
The Merger. 56 Ap 
The Middle Age of Mrs. Eliot. 58 
The Mind and Faith of A. Powell Davies. 

53 Ag 
Miss Alcott of Concord. 52 My 
Mr. Otis, il 52 F 
Mrs. 'Arris Goes to Paris. 56 Ap 
Moonlight at Midday. 53 Je 
More Stories to Remember. 58 O 



The Movement of World Revolution. 53 Ag 
N.A. 1 Looking South. 53 My 
Nashville as a World Religious Center. 52 Ap 
The New Golden Bough. 53 D 
The New Testament. (The Verona Testa- 
ment) 49 Ap 
The New Testament in Modern English. 50 F 
No Bars Between. 49-50 Ja 
No More War. 53 O 
Norman Vincent Peale, Minister to Millions. 

51 Mr 

Of Lasting Interest. 66 Jl 

Omnibus of Speed. 54 Mr 

The Once and Future King. 57-58 My 

Operation Sea Lion. 49 Ja 

Our Fathers and Us : The Heritage of the 

Methodists. 55 Ap 
Our Land, Our People. 53 Je 
The Pageant of Elizabethan England. 54 Ag 
Paint It Yourself. 53 Jl 
Paradise in Trust. 54 Ag 
Parents' Guide to the Emotional Needs of 

Children. 53-4 O 
Paris. 53 My 

Passionella and Other Stories. 56 Jl 
Pay, Pack, and Follow. 55 S 
Peace or Atomic War ? il 54 F 
The Peninsula. 53 Je 
The People's Plato. 54 Jl 
Peter Stuyvesant and His New York : a 

Biography of a Man and a City. 54 O 
Pictorial Profile of the Holy Land. 53 Ag 
Plowshare in Heaven. 50 Mr 
The Pocket Book of Old Masters. 55 S 
The Pocket History of the United States. 55 S 
Points of View. 54 A g 
Poltergeists, rev 55 S 
Population Bomb. 54 Ap 
Prairie Schooner Lady. 54 D 
Preacher's Kids, il 49 Ja 
The Prerequisites for Peace. 53 O 
Prison Is My Parish. 50 Ja 
A Protestant Thought : From Rousseau to 

Ritschl. 53 D 
The Proud Possessors. 51 Ap 
Puns, Puns, Puns. 55 Ap 
A Quite Remarkable Father. 56 O 
Reader's Digest Treasury of Wit & Humor. 

56 Jl 
The Rebel Emperor. 52 Ag 
Religion as Creative Insecurity. 51 Ap 
The Religions of the World Made Simple. 

50 Mr 
Remember the Alamo ! 61 F 
The Restoration of Meaning to Contemporary 

Life. 49 Ap 
Revised Standard Version Reference Bible. 

52 O 

Revive Your Rooms and Furniture. 53 Jl 

Rice Roots : an American in Asia. 53 O 

Richard Nixon : a Political and Personal 
Portrait. 52 O 

The Riddle of Roman Catholicism. 62 D 

River World. 53 Je 

Roaming Britain. 53 My 

A Rockefeller Family Portrait : From John 
D. to Nelson. 56 O 

The Rome I Love. 63 My 

A Room in Moscow. 55 Ag 

Sailing the Seven Seas. 51 F 

Sarajevo. 54 D 

Satallites, Rockets and Outer Space. 55 S 

The Saturday Evening Post Cartoon Festival, 
il 50 Mr 

Say It with Words. 56 O 

Sea Devil of the Confederacy. 53 Ag 

Second-Rate Brains. 64 Ja 

A Second Reader's Notebook. 64 Jl 

Secret Missions of the Civil War. 52 Jl 

Seven One-Act Plays. 64 Ja 

Sex, Vice, and Business. 62 O 

Shadow of the Almighty, The Life and Tes- 
tament of Jim Elliot. 50 Ja 

She Had a Magic. 52 Je 

The Sleepwalkers, por 56 S 

Snoopy. 52 Ja 

Soldiers of the Word. 56 D 

Some Things Worth Knowing. 55 Ag 

South Town. 57 Mr 

A Southern Moderate Speaks. 54, 56 Je 

The Southern Temper. 56 O 

The Soviet Union and the Middle East. 53 O 

The Space Child's Mother Goose. 56 O 

Spartacus. 56 Je 

The Spirit of American Christianity. 51 Ap 

The Spirit of 'Seventy-Six. 54 My 

Star Maker. 54 Ag 

The Status Seekers. 62 Ag 

Stories to Remember. 58 O 

Story of the Bible World. 52 Ag 

The Story of the Texas Rangers. 61 F 

Stride Toward Freedom. 52, 54 Ja 

Successful Surf. 54 Jl 

The Surge of Piety in America. 51 Ap 

Tahiti Nui. 53 Ag 

Tenderloin. 66 Ap 

A Testament of Faith. 50 Ja 

30 Days to a More Powerful Vocabulary. 
55 S 

This Is the South, il 62 O 

Through the Frozen Frontier. 52 Jl 

Time and Its Measurement. 53 Mr 

To All Nations. 56 D 

To Appomattox, Nine April Days. 63 Jl 

A Treasury of Masonic Thought. 54 Ap 

Trigger Marshall. 50 Ja 

Tropical Fish in Your Home. 53 Jl 

Trumbull Park. 109, 110 N 

20 Centuries of Christianity. 52 Jl 



20 Centuries of Great European Painting. 
52-53 Je 

'Twixt Twelve and Twenty. 54, 56 My 

The Ugly American. 56 Mr 

Understanding and Preventing Juvenile De- 
linquency. 51-52 F 

Understanding the City Child. 54 My 

The Van Cliburn Legend. 54 Jl 

The Velvet Knife. 110 N 

Venture of Faith. 56 D 

The War for the Union : The Improvised 
War. 52 D 

War Memoirs of Charles de Gaulle. 54 S 

Washington Holiday. 53 Je 

West of the Indus. 52 Mr 

The West That Was, From Texas to Montana. 
52 Ap 

What Dr. Spock Didn't Tell Us: a Survival 
Kit for Parents, il 54 Ag 

What We Must Know About Communism. 
53-54 Mr 

What's Right with Race Relations. 54 Ag 

Who Live in Shadow. 54 S 

Why We Act That Way. 54 Ap ; 55 S 

Wife dressing. 56 Ag 

The Wine of Life. 55 Ja 

Work and Contemplation. 51 Ap 

The Years with Ross. 54 S 

Yesterday's Children. 52 D 

Young Thomas Edison. 51 F 

Your Public Relations Are Showing. 51 Mr 

Your Vocational Adventure. 56 Je 
BOONE, PAT 

'Twixt Twelve and Twenty, rev. por 54, 56 My 
BOSLEY, HAROLD A. 

Maybe you should preach. 32-34 Ap 
BOSTRAM, ETHEL and Sloane, Louise 

Revive Your Rooms and Furniture, rev 53 Jl 
BOTTICELLI, SANDRO 

Nativity scene, pctl 39 D 
BOYKIN, EDWARD 

Sea Devil of the Confederacy, rev 53 Ag 
BOYD, MALCOLM 

Christ on the screen, pctl 20-22 O 
BRADLEY, VAN ALLEN 

Gold in Your Attic, rev 54 Je 
BRANDT, CATHARINE 

A way out for shut-ins. il 19 F 
BREWSTER, DOROTHY D. and Harold N. 

The Church and Medical Missions. 56 D 
BRISCOE, ROBERT 

For the Life of Me; with Alden Hatch, 
rev 49 Ap 
BROOKINS, ELWOOD G. 

Participant in Can girls reform boys after 
marriage? por pw 47-48 My 
BROOKS, HARRY E. 

Meditation, por 50-51 O 
BROOKS, PHILLIPS 

Good news, great joy: Oh Little Town of 
Bethlehem. D. Antrim il 62 D 
BROWN, DELLA 

Participant in Shall we tell our children 
we're ex-convicts, por pw 31 Je 
BROWN, FRANK LONDON 

Trumbull Park, rev 109, 110 N 
BROWN, NORMA DORIS (Ferrars, E. X., 
pseud.) 

Depart This Life, rev 56 F 
BROWSING IN FICTION 

Fiction review each issue by G. Kennedy 
BUCHANAN, ANNABEL MORRIS 

Ten minutes with death, il 12-14 F 
BUCK, PEARL S. and Romulo, Carlos P. 

Friend to Friend, rev 51-52 Mr 
BUCKNER, MRS. WALTER C. 

Participant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
BULLIS, HARRY A. 

How I listen to God. por pt 11 F 
BURRIS, BECKY 

A better world begins with me. il re 45-46 Jl 
BURSK. EDWARD C. 

(ed) Business and Religion, rev 56 D 
BURT, JESSE C. 

Your Vocational Adventure, rev 56 Je 
BURTCH, MARIE 

A child prays, il 29 D 
BURTON, ELIZABETH 

(comp) The Pageant of Elizabethan Eng- 
land, rev 54 Ag 
BUSONI, RAFELLO 

The Man Who Was Don Quixote, rev il 52 Ap 
BYRD, ELIZABETH 

The gracious heart, il 47-49 D 
BYRNES, JAMES F. 

All in One Lifetime, rev 52 F 



CALAMITY JANE 

Badger Clark, "Poet Lariat" of the West. 
P. Carlin por 45-56 Ag 
CALKINS, WILLIAM S., JR. 

'Daddy, I want an ice cream cone !' il th 
35-36 My 
CALVIN, JOHN 

Geneva honors John Calvin, il ns 66 Jl 
CAMERON, FRANK 

The McDonald boys, il 34-36 Ag 
CAMPS AND CAMPING 

In Hiawatha land : a cabin in 10 days, pctl 

62-64 Ap 
Lazy F Ranch, pctl 76-78 Ag 
Methodism by-the-sea. (Ocean Grove, New 
Jersey) pctl 76-78 Jl 
CANDLER, ASA G. 

Thirst quencher, um por 56 N 
CANNADAY, JOHN 

Mainstreams of Modern Art. rev 58 D 



CARAVANS 

Caravans visit 140 churches, ns 73 Ag 
CARLIN, PAIGE 

Badger Clark, "Poet Lariat" of the West, 
por 45-46 Ag 
CARPENTER, JOHN L. 

Meditation, por 49 F 
CARPER, MARJORIE ANN 

Neat bargain — for sale or trade, (hamsters) 
il ha 58-59 Jl 
CARRIGHER, SALLY 

Moonlight at Midday, rev 53 Je 
CARTER, HODDING 

The Angry Scar, rev 56 My 

The Marquis de Lafayette : Rright Sword for 
Freedom, rev 51 F 
CARTER, WILLIAM 

It was God's way. pctl 38 D 
CARTWRIGHT, MRS. PETER 

Waiting for the chariot. C. Sandburg il 51 N 
CARTY, JAMES W., JR. 

How to report a conference. 49 My 

Nashville as a World Religious Center, rev 

52 Ap 
Religion on the beam, por 22-24 S 
What I Saw in Cuba. R. H. Short as told to 
J. W. Cartv. Jr. il 21-23 My 
CASKEY, PAUL E. 

Meditation, por 50-51 Jl 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 

See Roman Catholic Church 
CATTON, BRUCE 

(ed.) American Heritage Book of Great His- 
toric Places, rev 53 Je 
To survive man must s»rve. por 16-17 Mr 
CAVANAUGH. ALBERT B. 

Meditation, por 48-49 Mr 
CAVE. ANITA 

Mr. Turtle's house, poem tsf 63 My 
CERF. BENNETT 

Bumper Crop, rev 56 My 
CEYLON 

City mission — oldest Methodist church in 
Asia, ns 66 Ag 
CHADWICK. HAL 

Time of life, poem 50 Ja 
CHAPLAINS 

History of chaplaincy, ns 74 My 
Praises chaplains' work, ns 70 S 
CHAPPELL, RICHARD LEE 

Antarctic Scout, rev 56 S 
CHASE, MARY ELLEN 

Sailing the Seven Seas, rev 51 F 
CHASE, STUART 

Some Things Worth Knowing, rev 55 Ag 
CHASINS, ABRAM and Stiles, Villa 

The Van Cliburn Legend, rev 54 Jl 
CHENEY, ROWENA 

A mother's new vear prayer, poem 54 Ja 
CHIANG, MEI-LING (Mme. Chiang Kai-Shek) 
What resurrection means to me. por pt 11 Mr 
CHILDREN 

Battalions of babies. M. Mack il 17-19 Je 
Better for young eyes than TV (book list) 

51 F 
Children and puppies, cover My 
Explaining d»ath to children. H. H. and 

L. J. Sherrill il re 23-25 O 
For all children : faith in God. L. B. Hazzard 

pctl 1 F 
Happy hours for Franz und Gretchen (Kin- 
dergarten at Linz, Austria) pctl 74-77 Ja 
Help your children make friends, il th 32-33 

Ag 
Hospital sojourn — jr. style. C. L. Schulz il 

th 23-24 Ja 
'Just lean on me, grandpa.' D. Van Ark il 

th 43-44 F 
Let's not rush the youngsters. S. B. Win- 
chester il th 29-30 Ap 
Little boy meets God. A. McBirney il re 

43-44 Ja 
Little girl dressed as bride, cover Je 
The red wagon. L. Ware il re 21-22 Ap 
Teach a child to pray. E. P. Turner il th 

47-48 S 
Understanding the City Child, rev 54 My 

See also 
To "ether in the Home 
Together with the Small Fry 
Youth 

Parent-child relationship 
CHILDREN'S ALLOWANCES 

"Daddy, I want an ice cream cone!" W. S. 
Calkins, Jr. il th 35-36 My 
CHINA (people's republic) 

Admit Red China to UN? Churchmen differ. 

CHINESE AMERICANS 

Hin Wo. pctl 37-44 S 
CHOIRS 

Melody and mileage (Wesley Foundation 

choir) pctl 61-64 Ja 
Singing for the Lord, pctl 1 Mr 
CHOY, WILBUR 

Unusual congregation at St. Mark's Church, 
Stockton, Calif, pctl 63-65 F 
CHRIST 

See Jesus Christ 
CHRISTIANITY AND OTHER RELIGIONS 
Christian-Moslem partnership, ns 71 My 
CHRISTMAS 

An old story in a new setting, pctl 2-3 D 

It was God's way. W. Carter. (Nativity 

pctl) 37-44 D 
Let's make the Bible come alive. (Book list) 

53 D 
Letter to an innkeeper. M. Daves 36 D 
Special Christmas stars, tsf 60 D 



What shall I give? R. A. Murray tsf il 61 D 
When the Wise Man appeared. W. A. Ander- 
son re 30-31 D 
CHURCH 

Our church: built on a rock. D. L. Marsh il 

19 O 
CHURCH ADMINISTRATION 

Church ushers, il 20-21 S 
CHURCH AND STATE 

Issues getting hotter, ns 67 My 

See also 
Education 

Public schools and religion 
CHURCH ARCHITECTURE 

A chancel in the American tradition, pctl 

97 N 
CHURCH EXTENSION 

New church, no debt, ns 69 My 

Unemployed work at church, ns 73 Ag 

Will resume work on Washington Cathedral. 

ns 67-68 D 
CHURCH SCHOOLS 

Let us remember, let us rejoice 1 J. O. Gross 

por il 87-90 N 
Score Sunday schools, ns 69 My 
CHURCH UNITY 

Can't do it alone, ns 70 D 

Protestantism : co-operation or union, pw 

por 69-72 N 
CHURCH WORLD SERVICE 
Cubans' need desperate, ns 67 Ag 
New truck for CWS center, ns 72 D 

See also 
World Council of Churches 
CHURCHES 

A bit of old Japan in Spokane. (Highland 

Park Church) pctl 74-77 Ap 
Church builds on sand at Hialeah, Fla. ns 

70 Ap 
Davis Church decorated Western style. n» 

111 N 
New church in Panama, ns 71 D 
Nine churches burned today. P. W. Kearney 

il 16-18 D 
Paint-up week for churches, ns 71 Mr 
Rev. Wilbur Choy and his unusual congrega- 
tion. (St. Mark's Church, Stockton, Calif.) 

pctl 63-65 F 
St. Paul Methodist Church first in mush- 
rooming town, ns 68 D 
Should church doors be kept unlocked? il 

pw 33-35 Jl 
Should churches sell things? il pw 23-25 Ap 
Solve parking problem, ns 72 Ap 
Time out for table tennis. (Asbury Methodist 

Church, Prairie Village, Kansas) pctl 63- 

65 Mr 
You can hitchhike on church history, ha pctl 

76-79 D 
Your local church has history, too. W. C. 

Martin il 91-94 N 
CITIES AND TOWNS 

How Methodism grew up. H. Spence il 49- 

53 N 
1984 only 25 years away, por il 79-83 N 
'Think urban or die' Methodists warned. 

ns 73 Je 
CIVIL DEFENSE 

Cooperation by churches needed, ns 67-68 Ja 
CIVILIZATION 

To survive man must serve. B. Catton il 

16-17 Mr 
CLARK, BADGER 

A cowboy's prayer, pctl 2-3 Ag 

"Poet Lariat" of the West. P. Carlin por 

45-46 Ag 
CLARK, BLAKE 

Here comes the library ! il 18-20 Ap 
CLARK, ELMER T. 

(ed) The Journal and Letters of Francis 

Asbury. il rev 52 My 
The three roots of American Methodism, por 

25-27 N 
CLARK. WILLIAM E. 

Some college wants you. il 27 Ag 
CLARY, GEORGE E. 

Meditation, por 50 Ag 
CLAYPOOL, JAMES V. 

Meditation, por 48 F 
CLAXTON, HARRY 

God's mysterious way (Jesse Head) il 27 F 
CLERGY 

Mavbe you should preach. H. A. Bosley 32- 

34 Ap 
Our preachers, a parody on Annual Confer- 

ferences. pctl 25-27 Mr 
Pastors watch UN work, pctl 64-66 My 
Successors to the circuit riders (list of books 

about ministers) 50 Ja 
CLINEBELL, HOWARD J., JR. 

Star gazing : an easy lesson, il 65-67 O 
COLE, ELBERT C. 

Meditation, por 49 Mr 
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 
Aid for ministers-to-be. ns 72 Ag 
Alaska University library started, ns 72 Ag 
Don't be afraid of art. R. C. Underwood 

pctl ha 76-79 S 
Hails church colleges, ns 70 My 
The Meharry story. G. Daniels pctl 26-28 Ap 
$1 million for Negro colleges, ns 70 F 
Miracle millions for the mustangs. N. Bigbee 

por 17-19 Ag 
Religion gains on campuses, ns 70 Ja 
Should church-related colleges have wide-open 

doors ? pw por 32-34 S 
Some college wants you. W. E. Clark il 

27 Ag 
Students need the church, ns 69 My 



Students work at McKendree Chapel, pctl 
3 N 

See also 
Individual schools 
Methodist student movement 
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES— GIFTS 
AND GRANTS 
Receive grants from the National Science 
Foundation, ns 72 Je 
COMMAGER, HENRY STEEL and Nevins, 
Allan 
The Pocket History of the United States. 

rev 55 S 
The Spirit of 'Seventy-Six. rev 54 My 
COMMITMENT DAY 

'How free are you?' ns 73 D 
COMMUNION, HOLY 

In the American tradition, pctl 97 N 
COMMUNISM 

Bishop Raines urges a "quarantine against 

Communism." ns 9 Mr 
If we were Communists. R. L. Smith, il lse 
50 S 
COMMUNISM AND RELIGION 

Church activity irritating reds, ns 11 My 
Film to show Red tyranny, ns 11 Ag 
Methodism in Iron Curtain countries, ns 69 

F 
New pressure on Poles, ns 66 Ap 
What's ahead for religion in Russia ? il pw 
22-24 Mr 
CONANT. JAMES B. 

The American High School Today, rev 53 
My 
CONDUCT OF LIFE 

A better world begins with me. B. Burris il 

re 45-46 Jl 
Close your eyes and see better. M. B. Mc- 
Coy il 47-48 O 
The gracious heart. E. Byrd il 47-49 D 
I didn't ask to be born. L. Woodrum. il 

25 D 
If failure could be spelled success. H. I*. 

Satterfield il 19 Ag 
The layman who inspired me most. J. R. 

Geyer por 45-46 S 
Ripples of charity. H. Rockey il 30 Ag 
Shift gears. R. L. Smith lse il 82 N 
Shining armor. C. Pollock re il 29-30 Ag 
Ten lamps to light my son's path. H. E. 

Richards 72 Jl 
Use your hand brake. C. Foster il 25-26 S 
Where real charity begins. M. B. Johnstone 

il 43-44 F '57 
Who says you can't serve? R. L. Smith il 

58 D 
The wisdom of tears. M. M. Hunt re il 

35-36 S 
You can bypass wit's end. G. S. Nichols il 
43-44 Ap 
See also 
Human relations 

Little lessons in spiritual efficiency 
Faith 

Personal testimony 
CONFERENCES 

How to report a conference. J. W. Carty, Jr. 
49 My 
See also 
Annual Conferences 
General Conferences 
CONGO, BELGIAN 

Congo girls' lot improving, ns 67 Ag 
CONTRIBUTIONS 

See Stewardship and Finance 
COOPER, KENT 

Kent Cooper and the Associated Press, rev 
54 Ag 
COPES, V. EARLE 

Methodists love to sing, pctl 124-125 N 
CORSON, JOHN E. 

My "silent generation." por pt 13 Ag 
COSTAIN, THOMAS B. and Beecroft, John 

(ed) More Stories to Remember. 58 O 
COUCOUZES, JAMES A. 

Protestantism : Co-operation or union, pw 
por 69-72 N 
COUNTRY LIFE 

See Town and country 
COURT, FRANK A. 

Meditation, por 50-51 Jl 
COURTESY 

'Just lean on me, grandpa.' D. Van Ark il 
th 43-44 F 
COVELLO, LEONARD 

The Heart Is the Teacher; with Guido 
D'Agostino. rev 54-55 Mr 
COWAN, HARRISON J. 

Time and Its Measurement, rev 53 Mr 
COX, EDWARD 

And so, the Methodist Church starts. J. S. 
Payton pctl 28-37 N 
CRAFTS 

See Handicrafts 
CRANE, GEORGE W. 

Can girls reform boys after marriage? por 
pw 45-48 My 
CREATION 

Who made it? R. L. Smith il lse 57 O 
CROMIE, ROBERT 

The Great Chicago Fire, rev 56 My 
CROWELL, GRACE NOLL 

Morning walk, poem il tsf 65 Jl 
CROSS AND CROSSES 

Cross at Camp Jumonville. cover Mr 
CROY, HOMER 

Our wonderful Sunday dinners, il 14-16 My 
Star Maker, rev 54 Ag 
Trigger Marshall, rev 50 Ja 



CRUSADE SCHOLARS 

110 crusade scholars, ns 67 D 
CUBA 

Bishop Short to serve Cuba, ns 70 Ap 
What I saw in Cuba. R. H. Short as told 
to J. W. Carty, Jr. il 21-23 My 

D 
DAHL, ROBERT 

Breakdown, rev 55 Ag 
DAHLBERG, EDWIN T. 

Protestantism: co-operation or union, pw 
por 69-72 N 
DALTON, JOHN 

Participant in powwow Flowers and fu- 
nerals, pw 22-24 Ag 
DANIELS, GEORGE 

The Meharry story, pctl 26-28 Ap 
DAVALL, GRACE 

Pets, people & problems, por um 16 Ap 
DAVES, MICHAEL 

Letter to an innkeeper, il 36 D 

What I told Ted and Mary, il 61 Je 
DAVIS. BURKE 

To Appomattox, Nine April Days, rev 53 Jl 
DAWSON, CHRISTOPHER 

The Movement of World Revolution, rev 53 
Ag 
DEACONESSES 

Deaconesses needed, ns 69 D 
DEAD SEA SCROLLS 

And he unrolled the scroll, pctl 2-3 S 

John the Baptist — today. W. F. Albright il 
21-22 Je 

Scholars and scientists piece out the scrolls. 
pctl 23-24 Je 
DEAF 

Ministry to the deaf, ns 69 D 
DEATH 

Explaining death to children. H. H. and L. J. 
Sherrill il re 23-25 O 

Ten minutes with death. A. M. Buchanan 
il 12-14 F 
DE BISSCHOP, ERIC 

Tahiti Nui. rev 53 Ag 
DECKER, PETER 

Beyond a Big Mountain, rev 53 O 
DE GAULLE, CHARLES 

War Memoirs of Charles de Gaulle, rev 
54 S 
DELAPP. MARY H. 

Help your children make friends, il th 32-33 
Ag 
DENMAN, HARRY 

What prayer means to me. por pt 11 Ap 
DE ONIS, HARRIET 

(trans) The Incas of Pedro de Cieza de Leon 
54 O 
DEPP, MARK 

Predicts religion in future, ns 68-9 O 
DESEGREGATION 

See Race Relations 
DETWEILER, DOROTHY 

Participant in Are we too soft with delin- 
quents? pw por 32-34 O 
DEXTER, HARRIET HARMON 

What's Right with Race Relations, rev 54 Ag 
DICKENSON COLLEGE 

Robert Frost gives arts award, ns 74 Jl 
DISARMAMENT 

U.N. faces critical issues, il 16 O 
DOGS 

Children and puppies, cover My 
DOTY, JAMES EDWARD 

Mediation, por 50-51 O 
DOUGH, WHITNEY J. 

Faith by storm, il 13-16 Mr 
DOUGLAS, MARY 

Hillside hiker, por um 27 Je 
DOUGLAS, WILLIAM O. 

Exploring the Himalaya, rev 52-53 Mr 

(ed) The Mind and Faith of A. Powell Da vies, 
rev 53 Ag 

West of the Indus, rev por 52 Mr 
DOUGLASS, FREDERICK 

A boy and his hymnbook. A. Armour il 51 S 
DOWDY, DALTON A. 

Fliffo remembers, il tsf 58-59 F 
DRAFT LAW 

See Military service 
DRAKE, H. L. 

The People's Plato, rev 54 Jl 
DRAMA, RELIGIOUS 

Church drama "improving." ns 70 Ag 
DRYDEN, HUGH L. 

Plowshares to peace, pt por 13 D 
DUBOIS, JULES 

Fidel Castro, rev 54 Ag 
DUFEK, GEORGE J. 

Through the Frozen Frontier, rev 52 Jl 
DUFRESNE, MRS. FRANK (Klondy Nelson) 

Daughter of the Gold Rush ; with Corey 
Ford, rev 52 F 
DURKEE, ROBERT M. 

Meditation, por 50-51 My 
DUTTON, JOAN P. 

Enjoying America's Gardens, rev 53 Je 



EARLY, ELEANOR 

Washington Holiday, rev 53 Je 
EARLY, JACK J. 

Dakota College head at 33. ns 71 Je 
EASTER 

Christ's last days on earth, pctl 35-42 Mr 

Good Friday proposed as legal holiday? ns 
74 Jl 
ECKHARDT, A. ROY 

The Surge of Piety in America, rev 51 Ap 



ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE 

Christian Rural Overseas Program food for 
overseas, ns 71 D 
ECONOMIC PLANNING 

Europe is pulling together. P-H Spaak por 
map 15-17 Ja 
EDUCATION 

Board of Education gives Schisler awards. 

ns 68 Ag 
Christian education challenged, ns 9 Ap 
Education, action for peace, ns 69 Ag 
Favor taxes on schools, ns 65 Ja 
Hip Wo. pctl 37-44 S 

Should church-related colleges have wide- 
open doors ? pw por 32-34 S 
Some college wants you. W. E. Clark il 
27 Ag 
See also 
Church and state 
Colleges and universities 
Public schools and religion 
Theological schools 
EDWARDS, CHARLOTTE 
Heaven in the Home. 54 O 
EIFERT, VIRGINIA S. 
River World, rev 53 Je 
EISENHOWER, DWIGHT DAVID 

Congratulates Methodist Edna Donley, por 

ns 70 Ag 
1789-1959 history repeats, pctl 14-15 N 
ELEGANT, ROBERT S. 

The Dragon's Seed, rev 56 S 
ELIZABETH II, QUEEN OF ENGLAND 

Bishop praises queen, ns 72 S 
ELLIOT, ELIZABETH 

Shadow of the Almighty, The Life and 
Testament of Jim Elliot, rev 50 Ja 
ELLISON, JAMES WHITFIELD 
Freest Man on Earth, rev 57 Mr 
ELMEN, PAUL 

The Restoration of Meaning to Contemporary 
Life, rev 49 Ap 
EMBURY, PHILIP 

Preaching in his home. J. B. Whittaker il 
39 Je 
EMORY UNIVERSITY 
Ancient treasure, ns 72 Ap 
Promote nursing scholarships, ns 71 Ap 
EMPLOYMENT 

No work after 40? ns 70-71 Mr 
ENSLEY, F. GERALD, BISHOP 

The Marks of Christian Education, rev 52 Ap 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

See Protestant Episcopal Church 
ERIKSSON, PAMELA 
The Life and Death of the Duchess, rev 
53 Ag 
EUROPE 

Europe is pulling together. P-H Spaak por 
map 15-17 Ja 
See also 
Individual countries 
EVANGELISM (AND MEMBERSHIP) 

The chief business of the church. R. L. 

Smith il lse 46 F 
Church needs faster growth says Dr. Den- 
man, ns 67 Jl 
Dr. Denman urges weekly home visits, ns 

68 Mi- 
ll million Methodists by 1970. ns 68 Ja 
Good land=good churchgoers, ns 71 Ag 
Invite unchurched to explore, ns 11 Ag 
Kitchens- -or children? ns 72 My 
Membership in U.S. religious bodies soars. 

ns 11 Ag 
Membership up 1.31 per cent, ns 9 Ja 
Methodists on the march around the world. 

68 Je '57 
1960's crucial for the church, ns 70 Jl 
Radio pairs church, baseball, ns 70 Ag 
Revive churches, chapels, ns 67 S 
$10,000 nest egg. ns 72 Ap 

They rang 1,000 doorbells. (Christian Wit- 
ness Campaign) pctl 20-23 F 
2,537 miles of Methodists, ns 69 Jl 
Year-long attendance push, ns 72 Ag 

See also 
Upper Room 
EVARTS, HAL G. 

Jedediah Smith, Trail Blazer of the West. 
53 O 
EVERETT, C. ROY 

Peace on earth starts in the heart, pw por 
26-28 D 
EYLES, ARTHUR H. 
Pod birds, il tsf 61 Ag 

F 
FAITH 

Faith by storm. W. J. Dough il 13-16 Mr 
A faith to live by. G. Kennedy il 30-32 Mr 
The layman who inspired me most. J. R. 

Geyer por 45-46 S 
Little boy meets God. A. McBirney il re 

43-44 Ja 
A new team ; medicine and faith. H. N. 

Ferguson il 43-44 Mr 
Twenty minutes of reality. M. P. Montague 

il re 32-34 Mr 

See also 
Personal Testimony 
Your Faith and Your Church 
FAMILY LIFE 

God, give me strength. M. Griffiths il pt 

13 My 
The McDonald boys. F. Cameron il 34-36 Ag 
Mothers, go home! C. K. Jackson il 17-19 S 
Not all split in Hollywood, ns 67 Ag 



Our wonderful Sunday dinners. H. Croy il 

14-16 My 
Shall we tell our children we're ex-convicts? 
G. Shelby as told to G. Barker il pw 28-31 
Je 
Technology at fault, ns 67 D 

See also 
Parent-child relationship 
Together in the Home 
FARMERS 

Land is a loan from the Lord, pctl pcm 
19-23 Jl 
See also 
Town and country 
FARMS AND FARMING 

Contour farming. Cover Jl 
FAST, HOWARD 

Spartacus. rev 56 Je 
FATHERS DAY 

Father has a day, too. I. M. Mohler il 25 Je 
FEIFFER, JULES 

Passionella and Other Stories, rev 56 Jl 
FENTON, CARROLL LANE and Adams, 
Mildred 
The Fossil Book rev 56 Jl 
FENNIMORE, ARTHUR, JR. 

Versatile virtuoso, por um 29 F 
FERGUSON, CHARLES W. 

Say It with Words, rev 56 O 
FERGUSON, H. N. 

A new team: medicine and faith il 43-44 Mr 
FERRARS, E. X., pseud. 

See Brown, N. D. 
FEY, HAROLD E. and McNickle, D'Arcy 
Indians and Other Americans, rev 56 Ag 
FIESOLE. GIOVANNI DA 

Nativity scene, pctl 39 D 
FINLAND 

Mark 100 years of Methodism in Finland. 
ns 71 Mv 
FIRES 

Church smoking areas? ns 69 My 

Nine churches burned today. P. W. Kearney 

il 16-18 D 
School fire jolts churches, ns 69 F 
Ten minutes with death. A. M. Buchanan il 
12-14 F 
FIRST AID IN ILLNESS AND INJURY 

Biblical first aid. ns 70 O 
FISHER, AILEEN 

Valentine's day. poem tsf 59 F 
FISHER, ED 

First Folio, rev 52 D 
FISHING 

Salt water runs in their blood, pctl pcm 
18-21 Mr 
FLEMING, ROBERT and Bethel 

Nepal on top of the world, pctl 35-44 O 
FLEMMING, ARTHUR 

Secretary, um por 57 N 
FLETCHER, GRACE NIES 

Preacher's Kids, rev il 49 Ja 
FLETCHER, INGLIS 

Pay, Pack, and Follow, rev 55 S 
FLOWERS 

Flowers and funerals, pw 22-23 Ag 
Grandmother's legacy, (hollyhocks) R. Berry 

pctl 76-78 My 
The mission rose, pctl 2-3 Jl 
FOGARTY, ANNE 

Wife Dressing, rev 56 Ag 
FOOTBALL 

All-American Methodist university and col- 
lege elevens. F. Russell il 25-27 Ja 
FORECASTS 

A sharp look ahead 25 years. W. M. Kip- 
linger il 12-14 Ja 
FOREIGN AID 

See Economic assistance 
FOREIGN RELATIONS 

See United States — Foreign relations 
FORESTER, C. S. 
The Last Nine Days of the Bismarck, rev 
53 Ag 
FOSDICK, HARRY EMERSON 

The Living of These Days, rev 50 Ja 
FOSDICK. RAYMOND B. 

Chronicle of a Generation, rev 52 Je 
FOSTER, CONSTANCE 

Use your hand brake, il 25-26 S 
FOSTER PARENTS 

The McDonald boys. F. Cameron il 34-36 Ag 
FRA ANGELICO 

See Fiescole, Giovanni da 
FRANCE 

Alcoholism is becoming another headache for 
France, il 33-34 F 
FRANKLIN, MARVIN A., BISHOP 

Congratulated by Vice-President Nixon on 
succession to Council of Bishops presidency, 
il 67 Jl 
Elected president of Council of Bishops, ns 

11 Je 
A praver for the Methodist Church, pt por 
13 N 
FRAZIER, SIR JAMES GEORGE 

(abrt The New Golden Bough, rev 53 D 
FRAZER. PAUL W. 

Antarctic Assault, rev 52 Jl 
FRY, MONROE 

Sex, Vice, and Business. 52 O 
FUCHS, VIVIAN and Hillary, Sir Edmund 

The Crossing of Antarctica, rev 52 Jl 
FUNERALS 

Flowers and funerals, pw 22-23 Ag 
FUNK, WILFRED and Lewis, Norman 

30 Days to a More Powerful Vocabulary, 
rev 55 S 



FURNAS, F. C. 

And sudden death, re 14-16 Je 



GALLICO, PAUL 

Mrs. 'Arris Goes to Paris, rev 56 Ap 
GALLAGHER, THOMAS 

Fire at Sea : the Story of the Mono Castle, 
rev 53 Ag 
GAMBLING 

Opposes legalizing pari-mutuel betting and 
bingo, ns 71 Ag 
GAMES 

Silly story for tired travelers, il tsf 67 Je 
GANTZ, CHARLOTTE ORR 

Discovering Nature, rev 51 F 
GARDENS 

A bit of old Japan in Spokane. (Highland 
Park Church) pctl 74-77 Ap 
GARRETTSON, FREEBORN 

And so, The Methodist Church starts. J. S. 
Payton pctl 31 N 
GARRISON, WEBB B. 

Methodist words, il 53 N 
GARY, ROMAIN 

Lady L. rev 57 Jl 
GAULT, DOROTHY 

How to live dangerously, il th 17-18 O 
GENERAL CONFERENCE 

Days of decision at Denver. R. L. Smith 
il 73-75 N 

Methodism in magnification, il 74 N 

New shrines recommended to General Con- 
ference, ns 67 D 
GERARD, GEOFFREY and Mclnerny, Derek 

All about tropical fish. 56 O 
GERMANY 

Admit women pastors, ns 69 Ag 

Bishop Wunderlich praises German Prot- 
tants. ns 66 F 

Red zone sets Bible record, ns 72 S 

Repentance for suffering caused by Nazis, ns 
68 D 
GETTING ALONG TOGETHER 

44 Ja ; 29 Mr ; 20 Ap ; 26 S ; 49 D 
GEYER, J. ROGER 

The layman who inspired me most, por 
45-46-S 
GIBSON, JOHN M. 

Soldiers of the Word. 56 D 
GILES, W. GLOVER 

Named to Hall of Fame in Philanthropy, 
ns 9 Ap 
GILLIARD, E. THOMAS 

Living Birds of the World, rev 54 Ag 
GLASS PAINTING AND STAINING 

Methodist history in one window, pctl 126 N 
GLICK, CARL 

(compl A Treasury of Masonic Thought, 
rev 54 Ap 
GOEWEY, HOBART F. 

Meditation, por 48-49 Mr 
GOFF, CHARLES RAY 

Invitation to Commune, rev 56 Je 
GOLDBERG, REUBEN L. 

How to Remove the Cotton from a Bottle 
of Aspirin, il rev 59 S 
GOLDEN, HARRY 

For 2c Plain, rev 52 O 
GOOD FRIDAY 

GOODFRIEND, ARTHUR 

Rice Roots : an American in Asia, rev 53 O 
GOODMAN, DAVID 

Parents' Guide to the Emotional Needs of 
Children rev 53-4 O 
GORDON, ARTHUR 

Norman Vincent Peale, Minister to Millions, 
rev 51 Mr 
GORDON, ARTHUR and Blanton, Smiley 

What to do with aging parents, il 14-16 Jl 
GORDON, GORDON and Mildred 

Shades of Sherlock, por um 29 F 
GORHAM, CHARLES 

The Wine of Life, rev 55 Ja 
GOVERNORS 

12 Methodist governors, ns 73 My 
GRADY, HENRY W. 

Editor with a mission, um por 54 N 
GRAHAM, LORENZ 

South Town, rev 57 Mr 
GRANDPARENTS 

Grandmother's legacy, (hollyhocks) R. Berry 
pctl 76-78 My 

'Just lean on me, grandpa.' D. Van Ark il 
th 43-44 F 

Walking with grandma. M. R. Grenier poem 
il tsf 61 Ap 
See also 

Age and Aging 
GRANT, ULYSSES S. 

Final battle, um por 55 N 
GREAT BRITAIN 

British Methodism is different. H. Spence 
il 24-27 Jl 

Britons discuss race, ns 73 S 

Fewer British Methodists, ns 73 My 
GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH 
See Orthodox Eastern church 
GREENLEAF, WILLIAM 

John D. Rockefeller, rev 56 O 
GRENIER, MILDRED R. 

Walking with grandma, poem il tsf 61 Ap 
GRIFFITH, LESTER E. 

My 40 days and nights with the Algerian 
rebels, il 12-14 Ap 
GRIFFITHS, MARTHA 

God, give me strength, por pt 13 My 



GROSE, WILBUR D. 

Meditation, por 50-51 My 
GROSS, JOHN O. 

Let us remember, let us rejoice ! por il 
87-90 N 
GROVER, WAYNE C. 

It was news in 1784. il por 22-24 N 
GUERNICA 

P. Picasso, pctl 14 D 
GUICE, JOHN A. 

Meditation, por 53 S 



HACKNEY, ALAN 

I'm All Right, Jack, rev 58 S 
HAINES, MADGE and Morrill, Leslie 

Lewis and Clark, Explorers to the West, 
rev 56 D 
HAINSEY, VIRGIL M. 

Meditation, por 50-51 D 
HALE, BEREN G. 

Parents have growing pains, too. il th 
45-46 Je 
HALL, CLARENCE W. 

Adventurers for God. rev 58 D 
HALL, DALE S. 

West Point coach, um por 31 O 
HALLIWELL, LEO and Jessie 

Light in the Jungle, rev 55 S 
HALLOWEEN 

On Halloween : the trick is to treat, pctl 
61-64 O 
HAMM, BETTY B. 

Terry Turtle tries again, il tsf 62 My 
HAMMOND, P. MALCOLM 

Meditation, por 51 O 
HAMSTERS 

Neat bargain — for sale or trade, il ha 58-59 Jl 
HANDICAPPED 

A way out for shut-ins. C. Brandt il 19 F 
HANDICRAFT 

Make friends with nature, il 60-61 Ag 

Tricks with turtles, il tsf 63 My 
HANNA. EARL K. 

Meditation, por 48 Ap 
HARADA, MRS. MATSUKO 

Beachhead in Hawaii, pctl 37-44 Ag 
HARKNESS, GEORGIA 

Christian Ethics, rev 51 Ap 
HARLEY, GEORGE WAY 

Dr. George Harley of Liberia, pctl 21-24 D 
HARRIS, SARA and Murtagh, John M. 

Who Live in Shadow, rev 54 S 
HARWOOD, MARY 

Nativity scene, pctl 42 D 
HASEGAWA, GEORGE 

Beachhead in Hawaii, pctl 37-44 Ag 
HATA, TOMOKO 

From bombs to music, por um 20 Ag 
HAWAII 

Beachhead in Hawaii, pctl 37-44 Ag 

Invite unchurched to explore, ns 11 Ag 

Methodism in 50th state, ns 11 My 

Methodists build Hawaii's first home for 
retired persons, ns 71 Ap 

A stronger brotherhood witness, ns 68 Je 
HAWKER, BEATRICE 

Look Back in Love, rev 59 S 
HAYS, BROOKS 

A Southern Moderate Speaks, rev 54, 56 Je 
HAZZARD. LOWELL B. 

For all children : faith in God. pctl 1 F 
HEAD. EDITH and Ardmore, Jane Kesner 

The Dress Doctor, rev 56 Jl 
HEAD, JESSE 

God's mysterious way. H. Claxton il 27 F 
HECK, BARBARA 

The three roots of American Methodism. 
E. T. Clark por 25-27 N 
HEIDERSTADT, DOROTHY 

To All Nations, rev 56 D 
HERRMAN, RUTH 

'Miss Student Nurse,' 1959. por ns 70 F 
HEWITT, ARTHUR W. 

Rural church told to face up to the times, 
ns por 68 O 
HICKMAN. LEON E. 

1984 only 25 years away, por il 79-83 N 
HIGH, STANLEY 

Billy Graham, rev 50 Ja 
HILL, DOROTHY LaCROIX 

It's God, Help Me Understand, rev 54 Jl 
HILL, NORMAN and Lund, Doniver 

If the Churches Want World Peace, rev 
51 Ap 
HINTON, ELMER 

Uncle Gabe. il 15 F 
HIP WO 

Chinese Americans, pctl 37-44 S 
HOBBY ALLEY 

Don't be afraid of art. R. Underwood il 
76-79 S 

Ever drive a horseless carriage ? (automo- 
biles) il 57-59 Ag 

Hobbies, unlimited ; dolls, earth, trains. R. 
Underwood il 58-60 Ja 

I give my eyes to the blind. J. Samuel il 
60-62 Mr 

Neat bargain — for sale or trade. ( hamsters I 
il 58-59 Jl 

She plays it pianissimo, (miniature pianos i 
N. B. Thompson por 60-61 F 

Star gazing: an easy lesson. H. J. Clinebell, 
Jr. il 65-67 O 

3-D doodles. W. M. Holaday il 58-59 Ap 

Tricky talk in Texas. S. Walker il 59-60 My 

Up from the nickelodeon ; amateur movie 
making. R. Underwood il 58-60 Je 

'What's that word again ?' 60 My 



Your local church has history, too. W. C. 
Martin il 91-94 N 
HOBBY DIRECTORY 

See each issue 
HOGAN, BEN 

Golfing, por 52 Ag 
HOKE, HELEN and Randolph, Boris 

Puns, Puns, Puns, rev 65 Ap 
HOLADAY, WILLIAM H. 

3-D doodles, il ha 58-59 Ap 
HOLBROOK, STEWART 

Mr. Otis, rev il 52 F 
HOLLEY, CAROLYN F. and J. E. 

Pictorial profile of the Holy Land, rev 
53 Ag 
HOLTER, DON W. 

To head National Methodist Theological 
Seminary, Kansas City, Mo. por ns 68 Ja 
HOME 

See Family Life 
HOMES 

See Hospitals and homes 
HOMRIGHAUSEN, ELMER G. 

I Believe in the Church, rev 56 D 
HOOVER, DAN 

Amateur radio, um por 30 O 
HOSMAN, EVERETT 

Church ushers, il 20-21 S 
HOSPITALS AND HOMES 
Bequest to aid Negroes, ns 71 S 
Center for aged built at Des Moines, Iowa. 

ns 76 Je 
Church hospitals busy, ns 72-73 Je 
Dedication of cottage at Methodist Chil- 
dren's Home, ns 66 S 
Hospital sojourn — jr. style. C. L. Schulz 

il th 23-24 Ja 
Make medical history in Boston, ns 66 Mr 
Medical mission report, ns 70 Ag 
Methodists to run AEC Hospital at Oak 

Ridge, Tenn. ns 9 Ja 
Named to Hall of Fame in Philanthropy. 

ns 9 Ap 
Nebraska Methodist Hospital receives govern- 
ment loan, ns 69 O 
Oldsters want activities, ns 65 Ja 
Rally to fight flu. il ns 71 Je 
Ruth Herrman, 'Miss Student Nurse,' 1959. 
por ns 70 F 
HOUCK, HERBERT 

Lincoln at prayer, il ns 65 Ap 
HOWARD, CHARLES W. 

Year-round Santa, um por 32 D 
HOWARD, LESLIE RUTH 

A Quite Remarkable Father, rev 56 O 
HOWARTH, DAVID 

D-Day, the Sixth of June, 1944. rev 52 D 
HOWE, REUEL L. 

The Creative Years, rev 54 Je 
HUGHES, LANGSTON and Bontemps, Arna 
(ed) The Book of Negro Folklore, rev 54 Ap 
HULME, WILLIAM E. 

God, Sex and Youth, rev 54 Ag 
HUMAN RELATIONS 

'A precious heritage.' ns 113 N 
Sticker campaign, ns 70 D 
HUMOR 

Methodist chuckles. 52 N 
Wicked Flea — see each issue. 
HUMPHREY, HUBERT 

Interview with Khrushchev on religion. D. 
Lawrence por pw 22-23 Mr 
HUNT, EVELYN TOOLEY 

Needlework, pctl 79 D 
HUNT, MORTON M. 

The wisdom of tears, re il 35-36 S 
HUNTSINGER, JERALD 

Lesson for the living. E. Beck as told to J. 
Huntsinger por pt 11 Ja 
HUTCHINSON, PAUL and Garrison, Win- 
fred E. 
20 Centuries of Christianity, rev 52 Jl 
HUXLEY, ALDOUS 

Collected Essays of Aldous Huxley, rev 54 D 
HUXLEY, ELSPETH 

The Flame Trees of Thika. rev 53 D 
HYMNS 

A boy and his hymnbook. A. Armour il 51 

A hymn for such a time. (Anniversary hymn) 

por il 122-123 N 
Dedicate 'Old Rugged Cross.' ns 74 Je 
Hymns to live by. D. K. Antrim il 46 O, 

62 D 
Methodists love to sing, pctl 124-125 N 
New hymnal for servicemen, ns 71 Ag 
Song for the ages ; "The old rugged cross." 

il 52 Ja 
Want Methodist Hymnal revised, ns 71-72 Ja 
HYMNS TO LIVE BY 

Courage: 'A Mighty Fortress Is Our God." 

D. Antrim, il 46 O 
O Little Town of Bethlehem. D. Antrim, 
il 62 D 



IAKOVOS, ARCHBISHOP 

Protestantism : Co-operation or union, pw 
por 69-72 N 
I-CHING KU 

Nativity scene, pctl 42-43 D 
IMMORAL LITERATURE AND PICTURES 

Asks tighter smut law. ns 72 Jl 

"Smut hurts missionaries." ns 68 Ag 
INDIA 

Key nation say two bishops, ns 11 Je 

New school at Lodhipur. ns 72 My 

Of 'prime importance.' ns 67 D 



INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA 

A Letter to the editor that got unexpected 

results. R. A. Billington il por 46-48 N 
Navaho teaches Navaho. pctl pem 24-27 My 
They are 'The People.' (Navaho) 4 My 
INDUSTRY 

Business and labor spotlighted at Conference 
on Industrial Relations, ns 69-70 Ja 
See also 
Labor 
INFANTILE PARALYSIS 

Teen-agers are good risks. T. Robertson as 
told to H. B. Teeter il 32-34 Je 
INFANTS 

See Children 
INOUYE, DANIEL K. 

Hawaii's first, um por 33 D 
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Kansas village wins fame. (Burns, Kans.) 

ns il 67-68 My 
Lauds youth exchange, ns 71 My 
Methodist students to study abroad, ns 71 Jl 
Year abroad for teens, ns 66 Ag 
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

New Protestant emphasis thru National 
Council of Churches, ns 66 F 
INTERNATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL 
LESSONS 
See Light Unto My Path 



JACKSON, CHARLES A. 

Our preachers, a parody on Annual Confer- 
ences, pctl 25-27 Mr 
JACKSON, CRYSTAL KATHLEEN 

Mothers, go home ! il 17-19 S 
JAMES, JEANS 

The Growth of Physical Science, rev 55 S 
JANSEN, JERRY 

Successful Surf, rev 54 Jl 
JAPAN 

Battalions of babies. M. Mack il 17-19 Je 

A bit of old Japan in Spokane. (Highland 

Park Church) pctl 74-77 Ap 
Plans Protestant Week, ns 69 O 
Protestant centennial to be observed, ns 70 

Mr 
Youth, a lost generation, ns 65 Ja 
JAZZ MUSIC 

Jazz Mass 'sacrilegious' ? ns 72 Je 
JESUS CHRIST 

Christ by Sallman : Two more views, pctl 

2-3 O 
Christ's last days on earth, pctl 35-42 Mr 
Come to me. (Brick Christ, Methodist 

Church, Albert Lea, Minn.) il 4 Je 
New sayings of Christ? ns 11 My 
Our church: built on a rock. D. L. Marsh il 
19 O 
JESUS CHRIST— BIOGRAPHY 

Christ on the screen. M. Boyd pctl 20-22 O 
JESUS CHRIST— NATIVITY 
Letter to an innkeeper, il 36 D 
Nativity scenes, pctl 38-44 D 
An old story in a new setting, pctl 2-3 D 
JESUS CHRIST— PARABLES 

Parable of the talents. K. N. Merritt por pt 
13 Jl 
JESUS CHRIST— RESURRECTION 

What resurrection means to me. Mme. Chiang 
Kai-Shek il pt 11 Mr 
JOHNSON, FLOYD A. 

And so, the Methodist Church starts, pctl 

28-37 N 
Old St. George's circa 1800. il 43 Je 
JOHN STREET CHURCH 

Historic Methodist church in New York, pctl 

2 39-41 Je 
Three roots of American Methodism. E. T. 

Clark por 25-27 N 
Together in the first parsonage home. H. 
Johnson th por 42-43 N 
JOHN THE BAPTIST 

John the Baptist— today. W. F. Albright il 

21-22 Je 
Portrait. A. R. Richards 20-21 Je 
JOHNSON, ALBIN E. 

There are no short cuts to peace. B. M. 
Baruch as told to A. E. Johnson 14-16 por 
il S 
JOHNSON, HELEN 

Together in the first parsonage home, por 
il 42-43 N 
JOHNSTON, CLEMENT D. 

Participant in What of the 'right to work' 
laws, por pw 28-30 Ja 
JOHNSTONE, MARGARET BLAIR 

Where real charity begins, por 43-44 F '57 
JOLLEY, DELBERT E. 

Meditation, por 47-48 Ja 
JOLLY, J. RALPH 

Meditation, por 48-49 F 
JONES, AMOS 

Participant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
JONES, E. STANLEY 

Are foreign missions through? 32-34 Ja 
'Grace, grass and gumption.' biog por 33 Ja 
Social revolution in world, ns 71-72 Ap 
JORDAN, I. DEAN 

Cherry pickers on the move, pctl 77-79 Je 
JULINE, RUTH BISHOP 

The sunshine cake, il tsf 56-57 Ja 
The youngest cousin, il tsf 60-61 Ap 
JUMONVILLE METHODIST TRAINING 
CENTER 
Cross at Camp Jumonville. cover Mr 



Where Washington first made history. R. C. 

Underwood pctl 74-77 F 
JURISDICTIONS 

Abolition of Central Jurisdiction, ns 71 Ag 
Debate plan to add bishop, ns 73 S 
Jurisdictional study nears completion, ns 72 

D 
Major report on jurisdictional system due 

1959. ns 66-67 Mr 
More members of Central Jurisdiction, ns 

74 Jl 
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 

Are we too soft with delinquents? G. E. 

Sokolsky pw por 32-34 O 
'Cure' for delinquency, ns 71 Je 
Kitchens — or children? ns 72 My 

K 
KANE, HARNETT T. 

The Golden Coast, rev. il 52 Je 
KEARNEY, PAUL W. 

Nine churches burned today, il 16-18 D 
KEENE, W. D. 

Sends magazines to sailors, por um 31 O 
KELLER, HILTGART and Cichy, Bodo 

20 Centuries of Great European Painting, 
rev 52-53 Je 
KELLEY, DONALD F. 

Participant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
KELLY, WALT 

G. O. Fizzickle Pogo. rev 54 F 
KENNEDY, GERALD, BISHOP 

African report. 56-57 Je 

Browsing in Fiction, see each issue 

A faith to live by. il 30-32 Mr 

(comp) A Second Reader's Notebook, rev 
54 Jl 

Says Schweitzer is man of century, ns 72-73 
My 
KERBY, ROBERT LEE 

The Confederate Invasion of New Mexico 
and Arizona 1861-1862. rev 51 Ap 
KERR, ALEX 

No Bars Between, rev. 49-50 Ja 
KERR, WALTER K. 

Meditation, por 50-51 Jl 
KESSLER, HENRY H. and Rachlis, Eugene 

Peter Sturyvcsant and His New York : a 
Biography of a Man and a City, rev 54 O 
KETCHAM, HOWARD 

Paint It Yourself, rev 53 Jl 
KEYES, NELSON BEECHER 

Story of the Bible World, rev 52 Ag 
KIAER, EIGIL 

The Complete Guide to Indoor Plants, rev 
53 Jl 
KI-CHANG KIM 

Nativity scene, pctl 44 D 
KILTON, M. H. 

Participant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
KIMBALL, HATTIE BLANCH 

Cloudland. poem il tsf 65 Jl 
KING, MARTIN LUTHER, JR. 

Stride Toward Freedom, rev 52, 54 Ja 
KINKEAD, EUGENE 

In Every War But One. rev 53 Je 
KIPLINGER, WILLARD M. 

A sharp look ahead 25 years, il 12-14 Ja 
KNOWLES. RUTH SHELDON 

The Greatest Gamblers, rev 56 S 
KOENIG, MRS. SADEY F. 

Participant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
KOESTLER, ARTHUR 

The Sleepwalkers, por rev. 56 S 
KOFFLER, CAMILLA (Ylla, pseud.) 

Animals in India, rev il 50 F 
KOONCE, DAVID F. 

Consultant for U. S. Civil Rights Commis- 
sion, ns 72 Ap 
KOREA 

Churches built in Seoul and Delhi, ns 70 O 

Korean Methodism grows, ns 72 Mr 

Methodists help build hospital in Korea. nB 
74 My 

Methodists second Christian group in Korea, 
ns 72 Ja 

Plan 250 more churches in four years, ns 11 
My 
KOSEKI, KIMI 

Nativity scene, pctl 42 D 
KREPS, RAYMOND R. 

Meditation, por 50-51 O 
KRESGE, STANLEY S. 

Philanthropist's 'first' por um 16 Ap 
KRUSSELL, ARLIE H. 

Meditation, por 50-51 My 
KRUTCH, JOSEPH WOOD 

Grand Canyon : Today and All Its Yester- 
days, rev 53 Je 
KUPFERMAN, THEODORE R. 

The Family Legal Adviser, rev 53 Jl 



LABOR 

Defends 'right to work' laws, ns 68-69 Ap 

Reform labor abuses, ns 67-68 Jl 

What of the 'right to work' laws ? il pw 
28-30 Ja 
LACOUTURE, JEAN and Simmone 

Egypt in Transition, rev 53 O 
LANSING, ALFRED 

Endurance, rev 52 Ag 
LANSNER, KERMIT 

(ed) Second-Rate Brains, rev 54 Ja 
LAPIERE, RICHARD 

The Freudian Ethic, rev 58 D 



LAQUEUR, WALTER Z. 

The Soviet Union and the Middle East, rev 
53 O 
LATIN AMERICA 

South American challenge big. ns 67 Ag 
LAWRENCE, DAVID 

Report on religion in Russia. (Humphrey in- 
terview with Khrushchev! il pw 22-23 Mr 
LAYMEN 

Every layman a minister, ns 73 D 

The layman who inspired me most. J. R. 

Geyer por 45-46 S 
Let us remember, let us rejoice ! J. O. Gross 

por il 87-90 N 
Prepare Laymen's Day aids, ns 68 S 
Put laymen to work, ns 70 Ag 
We laymen have a charge to keep. C. P. Taft 

por pt 13 O 
Where laymen come in. R. C. Raines il 17 F 
Clubs total 12,500. ns. 70-71 Je 
LEAKEY, JOHN 
The West That Was, From Texas to Mon- 
tana : as told to Nellie Snyder Yost, rev 
52 Ap 
LEDERER, WILLIAM J. and Burdick, Eugene 

The Ugly American, rev 56 Mr 
LEE, ANNA MARIA PITTMAN 

The mission rose, por 2-3 Jl 
LEE, JASON 
Why Oregon remembers Jason Lee. W. L. 
Worden por 30-32 Jl 
LEE, UMPHREY 
Our Fathers and Us: The Heritage of the 
Methodists, rev 55 Ap 
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

See each issue 
LEWIS, FLORA 

A Case History of Hope, rev 53-54 Je 
LEWIS, JOHN 
The Relicions of the World Made Simple. 
rev 50 Mr 
LEWIS, NORMAN 

The Comprehensive Word Guide, rev 54 Ja 
LEWIS, NORMAN and Funk, Wilfred 

30 Days to a More Powerful Vocabulary, 
rev 55 S 
LEY, WILLY 

Satellites, Rockets and Outer Space, rev 55 S 
LIBERIA 

Dr. George Harley of Liberia. Pctl 21-24 D 
LIBRARIES 

Alaska University library started, ns 73 Ag 
Here comes the library ! B. Clark il 18-20 Ap 
National Library Week, il 49 Ap 
LIEBERS, ARTHUR 
How to Housebreak and Train Your Dog. 
rev 53 Jl 
LIGHT UNTO MY PATH 

See each issue 
LILIES 

Bermuda, land of lilies, pctl 74-76 Mr 
LINCOLN, ABRAHAM 
The American dream. J. T. Adams re por 

20-21 N 
God's mysterious way (Jesse Head). H. Clax- 

ton il 27 F 
'He loved me truly.' (Sarah Bush Lincoln) 

B. Bailey and D. Walworth, il re 24-27 F 
Lincoln at prayer, il ns 65 Ap 
THE LINCOLN LIBRARY OF ESSENTIAL 
INFORMATION 
54 O 
LINCOLN, SARAH BUSH JOHNSTON 

'He loved me truly.' il re 24-27 F 
LIND, ROBERT W. 

Participant in Should churches sell things? 
il pw 23-25 Ap 
LINKLETTER. MONTE 

Cricket Smith, rev 57 Jl 
LIPPI, FILIPPO 

Nativity scene, pctl 39 D 
LIPPMANN, WALTER 

The Communist World and Ours, rev 54 
LIPTON, LAWRENCE 

Th° Holy Barbarians, rev 53 O 
LIQUOR 

Alcoholism is becoming another headache for 

France, il 33-34 F 
Cocktails banned, ns 68 D 
Hit easier drink law. ns 72 Ap 
Hits critics of temperance, ns 67-68 Ap 
Methodist Board of Temperance meets in Ja. 

ns. 66 Ja 
Showdown on liquor advertising, ns 9 Mr 
LIQUOR 

See Alcoholism 
LISSNER, IV AR 

The Caesars, rev 56 Jl 
LITT' E LESSONS IN SPIRITUAL EFFI- 
CIENCY 
See each issue 
LONG, KERMIT 

Meditation, por 47-48 Ja 
LOOK (periodical) 
Our Land, Our People : People in Pictures 
from Look Magazine, rev 53 Je 
LOOKS AT MOVIES 

See Movies, Looks at 
LOOKS AT NEW BOOKS (BARNABAS) 

See Book reviews 
LORD'S SUPPER 

See Communion, Holy 
LORING, KATHRYN 

Cheers for the new woman, il 14-16 Ag 
LOVE 

Where real charity begins. M. B. Johnstone 
il 43-44 F '57 



LOVELY LANE CHAPEL 

The three roots of American Methodism. 
E. T. Clark por 25-27 N 
LOVELY LANE CHURCH 

Historic Methodist church, pctl 37-38 Je 
LOWDER, NORMA 

These bells ring out. R. C. Underwood pctl 
63-65 D 
LUTHER, MARTIN 

Apple tree quote. 35 Ap 

Hymns to live by. D. K. Antrim il 46 O 
LUTHY, S. RAYMOND 

Meditation, por 47-48 Ja 

M 

McBIRNEY, ALLEGRA 

Little boy meets god. il re 43-44 Ja 
McCAULEY, ELFRIEDA and Leon 

A Book of Family Worship, rev 54 D 
MacLEAN, ALISTAIR 

The Secret Ways, rev 56 Ag 
McCOY, MARIE 

Close your eyes and see better, il 47-48 O 
MacDONALD, MALCOLM 

Angkor. 52 O 
McELVANEY, GENE 

Miracle millions for the mustangs. N. Bigbee 
por 17-19 Ag 
McGURN, BARRETT 

Decade in Europe, rev 56 D 
McINERNY, DEREK, and Gerard, Geoffrey 

All About Tropical Fish, rev 56 O 
MACK, MERIWETHER 

Battalions of babies, il 17-19 Je 
McKENDREE COLLEGE 

Students work at McKendree Chapel, pctl 3 
N 
McKENDREE, WILLIAM 

First native American bishop, pctl 2 N 
MacLEOD, EARLE H. 

Memories, poem il 79 Ag 
McLEOD, J. M. 

Meditations, por 52 S 
MACK, S. FRANKLIN 

Participant in Is religion on TV a flop? 
por pw 31-32 F 
MAKHULE, ALMERIA 

Portrait of an African artist. B. Simonsson 
pctl 2-3 My 
MAN 

To survive man must serve. B. Catton il 
16-17 Mr 
MANCHEE, FRED 

The Huckster's Revenge, rev 54 Je 
MANCHESTER, WILLIAM 

A Rockefeller Family Portrait : from John D. 
to Nelson, rev 56 O 
MAPS 

A guide for tourists, pctl 61-68 N 

Islands of Hawaii. 38-39 Ag 
MARRIAGE 

Can girls reform boys after marriage? il 
pw 45-48 My 

How to plan a wedding, pctl 62-65 Je 

Little girl dressed as bride. Cover Je 

More hymns at weddings, ns 70 Je 

New marriage manuals, ns 72 Ja 

What I told Ted and Mary. M. Daves il 61 Je 

When Protestant and Catholic marry, pctl 
76-78 O 
MARSH, DANIEL L. 

Our church : built on a rock, il 19 O 
MARSHALL, PETER 

First Easter; ed. and int. by Catherine Mar- 
shall, il 54 Je 
MARTIN. B. JOSEPH 

Meditation, por 47 Je 
MARTIN, LeROY A. 

Meditation, por 47-48 Je 
MARTIN, S. WALTER 

Meditation, por 47-48 Je 
MARTIN, STANLEY H. 

Meditation, por 47-48 Je 
M A RTIN, WILLIAM C. 

Your local church has history, too. ha il 
91-94 N 
MARY, VIRGIN 

The blue madonna, pctl 37 D 

What we know and believe about Mary. H. B. 
Teeter, pctl 35 D 
MASON, LOWELL B. 

The Language of Dissent, rev 56 O 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Salt water runs in their blood, pctl pem 
18-21 Mr 
MASTERS, ROBERT V. and Reinfeld. Fred 

Coinometry. rev. ed. rev 54-55 Ap 
MATHIAS, MRS. C. M. 

New honor: California 1959 "Mother of tin- 
Year." il ns 74 Je 
MAUGHAM, W. SOMERSET 

Points of View, rev 54 Ag 
MAUROIS. ANDRE 

The Lifo of Sir Alexander Fleming, rev 54 D 
MAUS, CYNTHIA PEARL 

Christ and the Fine Arts, rev 53 Ag 
MAY, MARTIN B. 

Dr. George Harley of Liberia, pctl 21-24 D 
MAZO, EARL 

Richard Nixon ; a Political and Personal Por- 
trait. 52 O 
MEAD, ELLA A. 

Medic of the year, um por 30 O 
MEAD, MARGARET 

Anthropologist at Work, rev 53 Je 
MEDICINE 

The Meharry story. G. Daniels pctl 26-28 Ap 



A new team: medicine and faith. H. N. Fer- 
guson il 43-44 Mr 
MEDITATIONS 

See Light Unto My Path 
MEEKER, ODEN 

The Little World of Laos, rev 56 Ag 
MEHARRY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

The Meharry story. G. Daniels pctl 26-28 Ap 
MEMBERSHIP 

See Evangelism and membership 
MENTAL HEALTH 

I helped mend broken minds. O. Y. Palmer 
il 49 Ag 
MERCER, ARTHUR B. 

Meditation, por 49 F 
MERCHANT, JANE 

Always in summer, poem il 79 Jl 
In Green Pastures, rev 56 Ag 
On Easter Morning, poem pctl 1-2 Mr 
MERRITT, KINSEY N. 

Parable of the talents, por pt 13 Jl 
METHODISM 

British Methodism is different. H. Spence 

il 24-27 Jl 
Encyclopedia planned, ns 68-69 Mr 
A faith to live by. G. Kennedy il 30-32 Mr 
Important months ahead, ns 11 Ag 
Methodism spans the Mississippi, pctl 2-3 D 
On stage : early Methodism, il ns 72 My 
Three historic Methodist churches, pctl 37-42 

Je 
U. S. Methodists plan for 175th anniversary. 

ns 66 Ag 
What do Methodists believe? R. W. Sockman 

il 58-60 N 
Why Oregon remembers Jason Lee. W. L. 
Worden il 30-32 Jl 
See also 
175 Anniversary Issue N 
METHODIST ALMANACK 

See Almanack, Methodist 
METHODIST AMERICANA 

A guide for tourists, pctl 61-68 N 
New shrines recommended to General Con- 
ference, ns 67 D 
You can hitchhike on church history, ha 
pctl 76-79 D 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Approve "dedication" project, ns 69 S 

Board of Temperance opposes merger, ns 69 

O 
Boards' merger likely, ns 72 S 
Celebrate 150th anniversary of Methodism's 

Constitution, ns 71 F 
For 3 boards: a merger? ns 70-71 F 
How should Methodists organize? F. B. Zepp 

il map 17-20 My 
Revive churches, chapels, ns 67 S 
METHODIST CHURCH 
See also 
Evangelism (and membership) 
175 Anniversary Issue N 
Specific areas of church work 
METHODIST ISLAND, U. S. A. 

Smith Island, pctl 62-65 Ag 
METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE 

And so, the Methodist Church starts. J. S. 

Payton pctl 28-37 N 
Looks ahead to 1975. ns 70 Je 
MPH expanding facilities, ns 114 N 
Report shows growth, ns 67 Ja 
METHODIST STUDENT MOVEMENT 

Methodist students delay merger with other 
youth groups. 8 O '57 
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 
Cross at Camp Jumonville. Cover Mr 
How to plan a wedding, pctl 62-65 Je 
In Hiawatha land: a cabin in 10 days, pctl 

62-64 Ap 
Let us remember, let us rejoice! J. O. Gross 

por il 87-90 N 
MYF boosts missions, ns 72 Ag 
MYFers see Skid Row. pctl 61-63 Jl 
They rang 1,000 doorbells. (Christian Wit- 
ness Campaign) pctl 20-23 F 
MEZOFF, ROBERT C. 

Theologue's day : long, hard, busy, il 32 Ap 
MIDDLEBROOKS, CHARLES L., JR. 

Meditation, por 47 Ap 
MIGRANTS 

Cherry pickers on the move, pctl 77-79 Je 
MILITARY SERVICE 

Draft renewal moves ahead, ns 9 Ap 
Urge draft study, ns 9 F 
MILLER. EDGAR and Elizabeth 

Nepal on top of the world, pctl 37-44 O 
MILLER, GEORGE AMOS 

Growing Up. rev 55 Ag 
MILLER, HASKELL M. 

Understanding and Preventing Juvenile De- 
linquency, rev 51-52 F 
MILLER, JOHN HOMER 

Why We Act That Way. rev 54 Ap ; 55 S 
MINIATURE OBJECTS 

She plays it pianissimo, (miniature pianos I 
N. B. Thompson por ha 60-61 F 
MINISTERS 

Admit women pastors, ns 69 Ag 

Aid for ministers-to-be. ns 72 Ag 

Boys hear about ministry from Bishop 

Raines, ns 71 Je 
40-hour week ? Not for pastor, ns 69 Ag 
Transatlantic pulpit swap, ns 71-72 Jl 
MINNESOTA 

In Hiawatha land: a cabin in 10 days, pctl 
62-64 Ap 
MISSIONS 

African report. G. Kennedy 56-57 Je 



Algeria : where crescent meets cross, il 15 Ap 
Are foreign missions through? E. S. Jones 

32-34 Ja 
Assign home missionaries, ns 66 D 
Board of Missions learns of conditions in 

Communist China, ns 68-69 Ja 
Bolivia — a land of decision, pctl 35-42 F 
Cuban Methodists hopeful, ns 66-67 Ap 
Dr. George Harley of Liberia, pctl 21-24 D 
For missions : new record, ns 65-66 Ap 
Griffith assigned to Belgium, ns 67 Ag 
Happy hours for Franz and Gretchen (kin- 
dergarten at Linz, Austria), pctl 74-77 Ja 
Increase in number of missionaries, ns 9 F 
Latin America needs more missionaries, ns 

68 Ja 
A letter to the editor that got unexpected re- 
sults. R. A. Billington il por 46-48 N 
Medical mission report, ns. 70 Ag 
Methodism's stake in the newest state. 

(Alaska) pctl map, cover 35-42 Ja 
Missionary Fellowship Candle, pctl 1 Ja 
Missionaries needed, ns 68-69 F 
Missions : a clearer look ? ns 66 Ja 
More U. S. missionaries, ns 69 Ag 
My 40 days and nights with the Algerian 

rebels, il 12-14 Ap 
Nepal on top of the world, pctl 35-44 O 
"Smut hurts missionaries." ns 68 Ag 
South American challenge big. ns 67 Ag 
$21 million for missions, ns 69-70 Ap 
Two doctors needed for Africa, ns 9 Ap 
United Church Women aid South Sea Island- 
ers, ns 71 Ja 
Virgin Island mission for Puerto Ricans. ns 

71 Ja 
Witnesses to the end of the earth. Mrs. J. F. 
Tillman, por 13 S 
See also 
Specific countries 

Woman's Society of Christian Service 
MISSOURI 

Methodist history in one window, pctl 126 N 
MITCHELL, STEPHEN A. 
Elm St. Politics, rev 56 S 
MOBILES 

3-D doodles. W. M. Holaday il 58-59 Ap 
MOBLEY, MARY ANN 

Mississippi miss. I Miss America, 1959 1 por 
urn 26 Je 
MOHLER. IRA M. 

Father has a day, too. il 25 Je 
MOLLOY, PAUL 

Participant in Is religion on TV a flop? por 
pw 30 F 
MONTAGUE, MARGARET PRECOTT 

Twenty minutes of reality, il re 32-34 Mr 
MONTGOMERY, BERNARD L. 

The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Montgomery, 
rev. 49 Ja 
MOORE, ARTHUR J., BISHOP 

Succeeds Bishop Ward in Orient, ns 9 F 
MORGAN, KENNETH W. 

(ed) Islam — the Straight Path, rev 55 Ag 
MORISON, SAMUEL ELIOT 

John Paul Jones, a Sailor's Biography, rev 
53, 54 D 
MORRILL, LESLIE and Haines, Madge 

Lewis and Clark, Explorers to the West. 56 D 
MORTON, J. STERLING 

Arbor Day. por 39 Ap 
MOSBY, JOHN SINGLETON 

The Memoirs of Colonel John S. Mosby. rev 
52-53 Jl 
MOSCOW, ALVIN 

Collision Course, rev 53 Ag 
MOSLEMS 

Christian-Moslem partnership, ns 71 My 
MOTHERS 

Every day is mother's day. H. J. Taylor il 

re 28-29 My 
If failure could be spelled success. H. P. 

Satterfield "Moms" in 10 states, ns 69 Ag 
Methodist "Moms" in 10 states, ns 69 Ag 
They are 'The People." (Navaho) pctl 4 My 
Mothers, go home! C. K. Jackson il 17-19 S 
MOTLEY, WILLARD 

Let No Man Write My Epitaph, rev. 57 Mr 
MOTT, JOHN R. 

Why pray for colleges? 46 Je 
World thinker, um por 57 N 
MOVIES, LOOKS AT 

H. C. Spencer Ja 46 : Mr 46 ; Ap 46 ; My 69 ; 
J 46 : Jl 48 ; Ag 48 
MOVING PICTURES 

Bishop Kennedy urges Protestants to back 

good movies, ns 67-68 Mr 
Christ on the screen. M. Boyd pctl 20-22 O 
Up from the nickelodeon : amateur movie 
making, il ha 58-60 Je 
MUMMA, HOWARD E. 

Meditation, por 48-49 Mr 
MURRAY, RUTH ADAMS 

Hand-me-down news, poem il tsf 61 S 

Summer is smiling, poem il tsf 67 Je 

MURTAGH, JOHN M. and Harris, Sara 

Who Live in Shadow, rev 54 S 
MUSIC 

African quartet tours U. S. ns 66 Ag 

Jazz Mass 'sacrilegious'? ns 72 Je 

These bells ring out. R. C. Underwood pctl 

63-65 D 
Want more rhythmic music, ns 71 Ag 



N 



NABOKOV, VLADIMIR 

Lolitn. rev 56 F 



NALL, T. OTTO 

Participant in What's ahead for religion in 

Russia? por pw 22-24 Mr 
Your Faith and Your Church, see each issue 
NANDA, B. R. 

Mahatma Gandhi, il rev 52 Jl 
NASSER, GAMAL ABDEL 

Peace on earth starts in the heart, pw por 
26-28 D 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF METHODIST 
YOUTH 
Ask searching questions, ns 116 N 
Youths and students ask separate organiza- 
tions, ns 111 N 
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES 

C. Wright Mills hits super 'power elites' at 

missions meeting, ns 67 Mr 
Defends right of conference delegates to take 

stand, ns 72 My 
Education, action for peace, ns 69 Ag 
International relations : new Protestant em- 
phasis, ns 66 F 
Teach belief in God, schools urged, ns 66 Mr 
Unity in our diversity, il 72 N 

See also 
Church World Service 
NATIONAL PARKS 

Action favorable to St. George's Meth. 

Church as a shrine, ns 71 My 
Ask inclusion of St. George's in Independence 

National Historical Park, ns 69-70 Mi- 
National Council of Churches expands parks 

ministry, ns 69 Mr 
Worship in our national parks, pctl 37-44 My 
NATIVITY 

See Jesus Christ —Nativity 
NATURE 

Make friends with nature, il 60-61 Ag 
NEBRASKA 

I helped mend broken minds. O. Y. Palmer 

il 49 Ag 
They rang 1,000 doorbells. (Christian Wit- 
ness Campaign ) pctl 20-23 F 
NEEDHAM, JANE BOYLE 

Looking Up. rev 52 Ag 
NEIDER, CHARLES 

(ed) The Great West, rev 50, 52 Ja 
NEILSON, PEARL 

My praver. il tsf 61 S 
NELSON, KLONDY (Mrs. Frank Dafresne) 
Daughter of the Gold Rush : with Corev Ford, 
rev 52 F 
NEPAL 

Nepal on top of the world, pctl 37-44 O 
NEVINS, ALLAN 

The War for the Union : The Improvised 
War. rev 52 D 
NEVINS. ALLAN and Commager, Henry Steele 
The Pocket History of the United States, rev 
55 S 
NEVINS, ALLAN and Ehrmann, Howard 

(ed) History of the Modern World, rev I v 
50 F 
NEW YEAR 

A mother's new year prayer. R. Cheney 
poem 54 Ja 
NEW YORK (CITY) 

John Street Church, pctl 39-41 Je 
New York at night. Cover O 
NEWCOMB, RICHARD F. 
Abandon Ship ! rev 50 Mr 
NICHOLS. G. S. 

You can bypass wit's end. il 43-44 Ap 
NICHOLS. MRS. J. B. 

Participant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
NICKERSON, WILLARD, JR. FAMILY 

Salt water runs in their blood, pctl pem 
18-21 Mr 
NICKLES, MARIONE R. 

(compi The Saturday Evening Post Cartoon 
Festival, rev il 50 Mr 
NORTH, STERLING 

Young Thomas Edison, rev 51 F 
NORWAY 

New churches are going up. ns 71-72 Je 
NORWOOD, FREDERICK A. 

Asbury in anecdotes, il por 38-41 N 

O 
O'BRIEN, BRIAN 

She Had a Magic, rev 52 Je 
OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY 

Methodism by-the-sea. pctl 76-78 Jl 
OEHLER, C. M. 

The Great Sioux Uprising, rev 52 Jl 
OGBURN, CHARLTON, JR. 

The Marauders, rev 52 D 
OLD-AGE 
See 

Age and aging 
OMAN, JOHN B. 

Participant in Should we tell our children 
we're ex-convicts? por pw 31 Je 
OREGON 

The mission rose, pctl 2-3 Jl 

Why Oregon remembers Jason Lee. W. L. 
Worden il 30-32 Jl 
ORGAN 

Uncle Gabe. E. Hinton il 15 F 
ORTHODOX EASTERN CHURCH 

Orthodoxy cool to Pope's plea, ns 69 Jl 
OSBORN. RONALD E. 

The Spirit of American Christianity, rev 51 
Ap 
OURSLER, WILL 

(edl Light in the Jungle. 55 S 
OVERSTREET, HARRY and Bonaro 



What We Must Know About Communism, 
rev. 53-54 Mr 



PACKARD, VANCE 

The Status Seekers, rev 52 Ag 
PAINTINGS 

Arbor Day. G. Wood pctl 38-39 Ap 

Braddock's Retreat, pctl A. Chappel 75 F 

John Wesley, por 2 Je 

John Wesley at 13. por 2 Je 

Old John Street, 1768. J. Smith pctl 40-41 Je 

Old St. George's circa 1800. F. A. Johnson 

pctl 43 Je 
Philip Embury preaching in his home. J. B. 
Whittaker pctl 39 Je 
PALMER, EVERETT W. 

Help for the alcoholic, il 35-36 O 
PALMER, FRANCES 

And Four to Grow on. rev 56 S 
PALMER, OPAL Y. 

I helped mend broken minds, il 49 Ag 
PARDUE, IDA M. 

Happy Jack, il tsf O 
PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP 

How to live dangerously. D. Gault il th 17-18 
O 

See also 
Family Life 
Together in the Home 
PARKINSON. GEORGE H. 

Meditation, por 50-51 D 
PARLIN, CHARLES C. 

Participant in What's ahead for religion in 

Russia ? por pw 22-24 Mr 
Wall Street lawyer, pctl 27-31 S 
PARRETT, RUTH 

Rose Festival Queen, 1958. (Mission rose 
pctl) por 2 Jl 
PARSONAGES 

Together in the first parsonage home. H. 
Johnson th por 42-43 N 
PASSION PLAYS 

Christ's last days on earth, pctl 35-42 Mr 
PARSONS, GEORGE A., JR. 

Meditation, por 50 Ag 
PASTERNAK, BORIS 
Doctor Zhivago. rev 55 F 
I Remember, rev 54 D 
PATTERSON, D. STEWART 

The Christian and Military Service, rev 55 
Ap 
PAULING, LINUS 

No More War. rev 53 O 
PAYTON, JACOB S. 

And so, the Methodist Church starts, pctl 
28 N 
PEACE 

Education, action for peace, ns 69 Ag 

Peace on earth starts in the heart, pw por 

26-28 D 
Plowshares to peace. H. L. Dryden pt por 

13 D 
There are no short cuts to peace. B. M. 
Baruch as told to A. E. Johnson por 14-16 
S 
PEAK, BART N. 

Participant in Are we too soft with delin- 
quents ? G. E. Sokolsky pw por 32-34 O 
PEALE, NORMAN VINCENT 

The Amazing Results of Positive Thinking, 
rev 54 D 
PEASE, DOROTHY WELLS 

Prayer, il 2 Ja 
PECKHAM, ROBERT H. 

Proof of faith ; a scientist's viewpoint, por 
pt 13 Je 
PELIKAN, JAROSLAV 

The Riddle of Roman Catholicism, rev 52 D 
PENNSYLVANIA 

Where Washington first made history. R. C. 
Underwood pctl 74-77 F 
PEOPLE CALLED METHODISTS 

Land is a loan from the Lord. (Clinton 

Richards family) pctl 19-23 Jl 
Meet the Quails of Athens, Tenn. pctl 18-22 
Navaho teaches Navaho. (Stokely family) 

pctl 24-27 My 
Salt water runs in their blood. (Nickerson 

family) 18-21 Mr 
Wall Street lawyer. (Charles C. Parlin) pctl 
27-31 S 
PERRY, EDMUND 

The Gospel in Dispute, rev 51 Ap 
PERSONAL TESTIMONY 

God, give me strength. M. Griffiths por 13 My 
How I listen to God. H. A. Bullis por 11 F 
Lesson for the living. E. Beck as told to J. 

Huntsinger por 11 Ja 
My "silent generation." J. E. Corson por 13 

Ag 
Parable of the talents. K. N. Merritt por 13 

Jl 
Plowshares to peace. H. L. Dryden por 13 D 
A prayer for the Methodist Church. M. A. 

Franklin por 13 N 
Proof of faith, a scientist's viewpoint. R. H. 

Peckham por 13 Je 
We laymen have a charge to keep. C. P. Taft 

por 13 O 
What resurrection means to me. Mme. Chiang 

Kai-Shek por 11 Mr 
What prayer means to me. H. Denman por 

11 Ap 
Witnesses to the end of the earth. Mrs. J. F. 
Tillman por 13 S 
PETERS, WILLIAM 

The Southern Temper. 56 O 



PETERSON. VIRGIL W. 

Participant in Can girls reform boys after 
marriage ? por pw 47-48 My 
PHILADELPHIA 

St. George's Church, pctl 42-44 Je 
PHILLIPS, JOHN BERTRAM 

(tri The New Testament in Modern English, 
rev 50 F 
PHOTO-INVITATIONALS 

'My country 'tis of thee.' (American pctl) 
36-44 Jl 
PICASSO, PABLO RUIZY 

Guernica, pctl 14-15 D 
PIGUERON, GEORGE H., JR. 

Meditation, por 50-51 D 
PLANNED PARENTHOOD 

Birth-control information aid to foreign 

countries ns 72 O 
Group o.k.'s birth control, ns 70 D 
POEMS 

All things bright and beautiful. C. F. Alex- 
ander il tsf 61 Ag 
Always in summer. J. Merchant il 79 Jl 
Cloudland. H. B. Kimball il tsf 65 Jl 
A cowboy's prayer. B. Clark pctl 2-3 Ag 
Hand-me-down news. R. A. Murray il tsf 61 

S 
Happy Jack. I. M. Pardue il tsf 60 O 
Memories. E. H. MacLeod il 79 Ag 
Morning walk. G. N. Crowell il tsf 65 Jl 
A mother's new year prayer. R. Cheney 54 Ja 
Mr. Turtle's house. A. Cave tsf 63 My 
My prayer. P. Neilson il tsf 61 S 
Needlework. E. T. Hunt pctl 79 D 
On Easter Morning. J. Merchant pctl 1-2 Mr 
The prayer. S. S. Sanders 18 Jl 
School's end. B. F. Smith il 79 My 
The seeker. J. Merchant 56 D 
Slim picking- R. Armour 55 Mr 
Springtime. C. M. Alexander il tsf 61 Ap 
Summer is smiling. R. A. Murray il tsf 67 Je 
Time of life. H. Chadwick 50 Ja 
Valentine's day. A. Fisher tsf 59 F 
Waiting for the chariot. C. Sandburg il 51 N 
Walking with grandma. M. R. Grenier il 

tsf 61 Ap 
What shall I give? R. A. Murray tsf il 61 D 
POLAND 

Church conducts English courses, ns 72 Je 
New pressure on Poles, ns 66 Ap 
Poland — 'Brightest spot' for Methodism, ns 
69 F 
POLLOCK, CHANNING 

Shining armor, re il 29-30 Ag 
POPULATION 

1984 only 25 years away, il 79-83 N 
World birth control: indifference ending? 
ns 67 Jl 
POTTER, TRUMAN W. 
Meditation, por 48 Ap 
POWWOW, MIDMONTH 

Are we too soft with delinquents? G. E. 

Sokolsky por 32-34 O 
Can girls reform boys after marriage ? 45-48 

My 
Flowers and funerals. 22-23 Ag 
Is religion on TV a flop? il 30-32 F 
Peace on earth starts in the heart, il 26-28 D 
Protestantism : Co-operation or union ? il 

69-72 N 
Shall we tell our children we're ex-convicts? 

il 28-31 Je 
Should church doors be kept unlocked? il 

33-35 Jl 
Should church-related colleges have wide-open 

doors? il 32-34 S 
Should churches sell things? 23-25 Ap 
What of the 'Right to Work' laws? il 28-30 

Ja 
What's ahead for religion in Russia? 22-24 
Mr 
PRATT, DOROTHY and Richard 

A Guide to Early American Homes I South). 
rev 53 Je 
PRAYER 

A child prays, il 29 D 

Churches hold prayer vigils for peace, ns 

9 Mr 
How I listen to God. H. A. Bullis por pt 11 F 
Prayer first choice for sermon topic, ns 71 Mr 
Teach a child to pray. E. P. Turner il th 

47-48 S 
Use your hand brake. C. Foster il 25-26 S 
What prayer means to me. H. Denman il pt 
11 Ap 
PRAYERS 

A child's prayer in 1959. tsf il 45 N 

Child's thank you. tsf 59 Mr 

A cowboy's prayer. B. Clark poem il 2-3 Ag 

Father in Heaven, we thank Thee. 6 S 

A mother's new year prayer. R. Cheney poem 

54 Ja 
My prayer. P. Neilson il tsf 61 S 
Prayer. D. W. Pease il 2 Ja 
A prayer about practice, tsf 60 O 
A prayer for the Methodist Church. M. A. 

Franklin pt por 13 N 
The prayer. S. S. Sanders 18 Jl 
PRICE, FRANK WILSON 

Marx Meets Christ, rev 51 Ap 
PRICE, WILLARD 

Roaming Britain, rev 53 My 
PRIEST, IVY BAKER 

Green Grows Ivy. rev 54 Mr 
PRISONERS, DISCHARGED 

Shall we tell our children we're ex-convicts? 
G. Shelby as told to G. Barker il pw 28-31 
Je 
PRISONS AND PRISONERS 



Asks help of clergy, ns 71 D 

An old story in a new setting, pctl 2-3 D 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Episcopalian predicts union of Methodists and 
Episcopalians, ns 70 S 

Keeps annulment in divorce restrictions, ns 
72 Ja 
PROTESTANTISM 

Protestantism : co-operation or union, pw 
por 69-72 N 

Protestant Week planned. 69 O 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND RELIGION 

NCC studies report on schools, ns 114-115 N 

Religion in schools, ns 66 Ap 

Study religion, schools, ns 70 O 

Teach belief in God, schools urged, ns 66 Mr 
PUPPETS 

Fun with clothespin puppets, il tsf 66 Je 
PUSHING, CAROLE 

Lady of the links, por um 28 F 

Q 

QUALLS, HERMAN, FAMILY 

Meet the Quails of Athens, Tenn. pctl pem 
18-22 Ja 
QUINLAN, STERLING 

The Merger, rev 56 Ap 



RACE RELATIONS 

Britons discuss race, ns 73 S 

Integration in churches urged by National 

Council of Churches, ns 71 Mr 
Promotion of racial understanding through 

education, ns 71 Ag 
To discuss race at Dallas, ns 69 Je 
What's Right with Race Relations. H. B. 
Dexter, rev 54 Ag 
RACHLIS, EUGENE and Kessler, Henry H. 
Peter Stuyvesant and His New York : a Biog- 
raphy of a Man and a City, rev 54 O 
RADIO 

See Television and radio 
RAHTJEN, BRUCE D. 

Patricipant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
RAINES, RICHARD C, BISHOP 

Defends 'right to work' laws, ns 68-69 Ap 
Urga a 'quarantine against Communism.' 

ns 9 Mr 
Where laymen come in. il 18 F 
RANCHES 

Lazy F Ranch, pctl 76-78 Ag 
RANK, J. ARTHUR 

Movie man's mission, por um 17 Ap 
RAPKING, AARON A. 

Rural church told to face up to times, por ns 
68 O 
RASCOVICH, MARK 

The Flight of the Dancing Bear. 59 D 
RATLIFF, HENRY 

Meditation, por 53 S 
READER'S CHOICE 

The American dream. J. T. Adams por 20-21 

N 
A better world begins with me. B. Burris il 

45-46 Jl 
And sudden death. F. C. Furnas 14-16 Je 
Every day is mother's day. H. J. Taylor il 

28-29 My 
Explaining death to children. H. H. and L. J. 

Sherrill il 23-25 O 
'He loved me truly.' (Sarah Bush Lincoln) 

B. Bailey and D. Walworth il 24-27 F 
Little boy meets God. A. McBirney il 43-44 

Ja 
The red wagon. L. Ware il 21-22 Ap 
Shining armor. C. Pollock il 28-30 Ag 
Twenty minutes of reality. M. P. Montague 

il 32-34 Mr 
When the wise man appeared. W. A. Ander- 
son il 30-31 D 
The wisdom of tears. M. M. Hunt il 35-36 S 
READER'S DIGEST (periodical) 

Treasury of Wit & Humor, rev 56 Jl 
THE RED WAGON 

Story, L. Ware il re 21-22 Ap 
REDFIELD, MARGARET 

Albert and the bad news, tsf il 60-61 S 
REESOR, ALLEN R. 

Participant in powwow Flowers and funerals, 
pw 22-24 Ag 
REFORMATION 

Geneva's Reformation Monument, il 66 Jl 
REFUGEES 

Help to Brazil, ns 72 Ja 

Refugees look up to United States, ns 69 Je 
Refugees U. S. bound, ns 66 Ap 
U. N. faces critical issues, il 16 O 
RELIEF WORK 

CROP gets $920,400. ns 72 Ap 
Grain bargain, ns 11 Ag 

See also 
Church World Service 
RELIGION 

The day my religion meant the most to me. 

E. Rhinesmith il pt 11-12 N '57 
Religion in future, ns 68-9 O 
Religion with depth. R. W. Sockman il 16-18 

F 
Russians view U. S. religion, ns 69 O 
Dr. Sockman sees spiritual recession, ns 72 
Space age needs vital religion, ns 69 Ja 
Other religions on the march, ns 66-67 F 
RELIGION AND SCIENCE 

Warns on science, ns 67 Ag 
REMAK. JOACHIM 
Sarajevo, rev 54 D 



RESURRECTION 

See Jesus Christ— Resurrection 
RETREATS 

They're called retreats. D. E. Trueblood il 
30-32 My 
RICH, LOUISE DICKINSON 

The Peninsula, rev 53 Je 
RICHARDS, ALBERTA RAE (SUNE) 

John the Baptist, il 20-21 Je 
RICHARDS, CLINTON, FAMILY 

Land is a loan from the Lord, pctl pem 19-23 
Jl 
RICHARDS, HERBERT E. 

Ten lamps to light my son's path. 72 Jl 
RICHARDS, SUNE 

See Richards, Alberta Rae (Sune) 
'RIGHT TO WORK" LAWS 

See Labor 
REUTHER, VICTOR G. 

Participant in What of the 'Right to Work' 
laws? por pw 28-30 Ja 
ROBERTS, GUY L. 

How the Church Can Help Where Delin- 
quency Begins, rev 52 F 
ROBERTSON, TOMMY 

Teen-agers are good risks. T. Robertson as 
told to H. B. Teeter il 32-34 Je 
ROBINSON, DONALD 

(ed) The Day I Was Proudest to be an 
American, rev 52 Ja 
ROCKEY, HELEN 

Ripples of charity, il 30 Ag 
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 
My daughter takes the veil, il 29 O 
Orthodoxy cool to Pope's plea, ns 69 Jl 
Religion no issue, ns 11 Ag 
What price ecumenicity? ns 68 Ap 
When Protestant and Catholic marry, pctl 
76-78 O 
ROMULO, CARLOS P. and Buck, Pearl S. 

Friend to Friend, rev 51-52 Mr 
ROOSEVELT, THEODORE 

The American dream. J. T. Adams re por 
20-21 N 
ROOT, E. MERRILL 

Brainwashing in the High Schools, rev 52 
My 
ROSEBERRY, GEORGE G. 

Meditation, por 50-51 D 
ROSS. THOMAS RICHARD 

Jonathan Prentice Dolliver. rev 54 My 
ROTT, WILHELM 

Master's plan, por tim 21 Ag 
ROWE, GUY 

God is our refuge, pctl 125 N 
RUBENS, PETER PAUL 

Nativity scene, pctl 40-41 D 
RUNYON. MILTON A. and Bergane, Vilma F. 
(ed) Around the World in 1,000 Pictures, rev 
53 My 
RURAL LIFE 

See Town and country 
RUSSELL, FRED 

All-American Methodist university and col- 
lege elevens, il 25-27 Ja 
RUSSELL, BEATRICE 

Living in State, rev 54 Jl 
RUSSELL, ELIZABETH HENRY 

Madam Russell, por 31 Ag 
RUSSIA 

Not fooling Russians, ns 65 Ap 
Russians view U. S. religion, ns 69 O 
What's ahead for religion in Russia? il pw 
22-24 Mr 



SAARINEN, ALINE B. 

The Proud Possessors, rev 51 Ap 
SAFETY 

And sudden death. F. C. Furnas re 14-16 Je 
ST. GEORGE'S METHODIST CHURCH 

Ask inclusion of Philadelphia church in 
Independence National Historical Park, 
ns 69-70 Mr 

Historic church to edge park, ns 71 S 

Historic Methodist church in Philadelphia, 
pctl 42-44 Je 

A national shrine, ns 71 My 

The three roots of American Methodism. 
E. T. Clark por 25-27 N 
ST. JOHN, ROBERT 

Ben-Gurion, The Biography of an Extra- 
ordinary Man. rev 56 My 
SALLMAN, WARNER 

Christ by Sallman : Two more view3. pctl 
2-3 O 
SAM THE SEXTON 

Sweeping Statements. 76 Je 
SAMUEL, JAN 

I give my eyes to the blind, il ha 60-62 Mr 
SANDBURG, CARL 

Waiting for the chariot, il 51 N 
SANDERS, HELEN BARRETT 

Just for ducks, il tsf 64-65 Jl 
SANDERS, SUE S. 

The prayer. 18 Jl 
SAN FRANCISCO— CHINATOWN 

Hip Wo. pctl 37-44 S 
SARGENT, RICHARD 

Cover creator, por um 26 Je 
SATTERFIELD, HELEN P. 

If failure could be spelled success, il 19 Ag 
SCHELL, EDWIN 

Meditation, por 50 Ag 
SCHLAMM, WILLIAM S. 

Germany and the East-West Crisis: The 
Decisive Challenge to American Policy, 
rev 53 O 



SCHULZ, CECILIA L. 

Hospital sojourn — jr. style, il th 23-24 Ja 
SCHULZ. CHARLES M. 

Snoopy, rev 52 Ja 
SCHWED, PETER and Wind, Herbert W. 

(ed) Great Stories From the World of Sport. 
rev 60-51 Mr 
SCHWEITZER, ALBERT 

Peace or Atomic War? rev il 54 F 

Schweitzer : man of century, ns 72-73 My 
SEARS, DEANNE and Rywell, Martin 

Coin Collectors' Guide, rev ed 54-55 Ap 
SEASONS 

See Individual seasons 
SERVICE MEN 

See Military service 
SETH, RAJENDRA K. 

Chaplain-chef, por urn 21 Ag 
SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM 

Four Tragedies, rev 55 S 
SHAW, GEORGE BERNARD 

Seven One-Act Plays, rev 54 Ja 
SHELBY, GLORIA 

Shall we tell our children we're ex-convicts ? 
G. Shelby as told to G. Barker il pw 28-30 
Je 
SHEPPARD, LILA 

The front porch, il 25-26 Ag 
RFSRRILL, HELEN H. and Lewis J. 

Explaining death to children, il re 23-25 O 
SHIPWRECKS 

Faith by storm. W. J. Dough il 13-16 Mr 
SHORT, ROY H., BISHOP 

1789-1959 history repeats, pctl 14-15 N 

What I saw in Cuba. R. H. Short as told to 
J. W. Carty. Jr. por 21-23 My 
SHOUP, DAVID M. 

Four-star marine, por um 33 D 
SHULMAN, IRVING 

The Velvet Knife, rev 110 N 
SICK, THE 

Who says you can't serve? R. L. Smith 
il 58 D 
SIMONSSON, BENGT 

Portrait of an African artist. (Almeria 
Makhule) pctl 2-3 My 
SINGAPORE 

Illustration. 17 F 

Singapore fights Communism with com- 
pulsory religious training, ns 69 Mr 
SINGLETON, MARGARET E. 

Mr. Baker's cap. il tsf 59-60 O 
SITWELL, DAME EDITH 

(ed) The Atlantic Book of British and 
American Poetry, rev 53 Mr 
SITWELL, SACHEVERELL 

Poltergeists, rev 55 S 
SKID ROW 

See Slums 
SLAUGHTER, FRANK G. 

The Crown and the Cross, rev 57 Jl 
SLUMS 

MYFers s-c Skid Row. pctl 61-63 Jl 
SMALL FRY 

See Together with the Small Fry 
SMITH, BEULAH FENDERSON 

School's end. poem il 79 My 
SMITH, ELINOR GOULDING 

Confessions of Mrs. Smith, rev 51 F 
SMITH, H. ALLEN 

Don't Get Perconel with a Chicken, rev 56 Jl 
SMITH ISLAND 

Methodist Island, U.S.A. pctl 62-65 Ag 
SMITH. JEDEDIAH S. 

Frontier explorer, por um 54 N 
SMITH, ROY L. 

The chief business of the church, il lse 46 F 

Cost of face, il lse 44 Ap 

Days of decision at Denver, il 73-75 N 

Did we go expecting? il lse 24 Mr 

Do you really read ? il lse 50 Je 

How to fail as a soul, il lse 49 Jl 

If we were Communists, il lse 50 S 

Let's live enthusiastically, il lse 17 Ja 

Play against the top. il lse 20 My 

Shift gears, il lse 82 N 

We are the endowment, il lse 24 Ag 

Who made it? il lse 57 O 

Who says you can't serve? il lse 58 D 
SMOKING 

Church smoking areas ? ns 69 Mv 
SNAVELY, FRANK R. 

Meditation, por 48 Ap 
SNOW, EDGAR 

Journey to the Beginning, rev 54 D 
SOCKMAN, RALPH W. 

Man's First Love, rev 54 Ja 

Religion with depth, por 16-18 F 

Sees spiritual recession, ns 72 My 

What do Methodists believe? por 58-60 N 
SOKOLSKY, GEORGE E. 

Are we too soft with delinquents? pw por 
32-34 O 
SONDERN, FREDERIC, JR. 

Brotherhood of Evil : The Mafia, rev 52 Je 
SOONG, CHARLES JONES 

Father of the Soongs. por 12 Mr 
SOUTH AMERICA 

See Latin America 
SPAAK, PAUL-HENRI 

Europe is pulling together, por map 15-17 Ja 
SPACE, OUTER 

Missiles and civilization. W. Von Braun por 
14-16 O 

Plowshares to pence. H. L. Dryden pt por 
13 D 

U.N. faces critical issues, il 16 O 



SPAIN 

Guernica, pctl 14-15 D 
SPEAR, LAREN 

Bread from heaven, il 17-18 Jl 
SPENCE, HARTZELL 

British Methodism is different, il 24-27 Jl 
How Methodism grew up. il 49-53 N 
SPIRITUAL EFFICIENCY, LITTLE LES- 
SONS IN 

See Little Lessons in Spiritual Efficiency 
SPIRITUAL LIFE 

Bread from heaven. L. Spear il 17-18 Jl 
SPRAGUE, CARROLL H. 

Meditation, por 48-49 F 
SPRING 

Springtime. C. M. Alexander poem il tsf 
61 Ap 
STAFFORD, J. P. 

Participant in Are we too soft with de- 
linquents? G. E. Sokolsky pw por 32-34 O 
STAINED GLASS 

See Glass Painting and Staining. 
STAMM, FREDERICK KELLER 

I Believe in Man. rev 56 D 
STANLEY, ED 

Participant in Is religion on TV a flop ? 
por pw 31 F 
STANTON, COBLENTZ 

The Long Road to Humanity, rev 58 D 
STATE GOVERNMENT 

Legislation of interest to church people, 
ns 68 My 

See also Governors 
STEERE, DOUGLAS 

Work and Contemplation, rev 51 Ap 
STERN, PHILIP VAN DOREN 

Secret Missions of the Civil War. rev 52 Jl 
STEVENSON, ADLAI E. 

Friends and Enemies, rev 55 Ag 
STEWARDSHIP AND FINANCE 

Larger offering sought for World-Wide 

Communion Sunday, ns 11 My 
Methodist funds gain, ns 70 My 
Miracle millions for the mustangs. N. Bigbee 

por 17-19 Ag 
Poor better givers, ns 70 O 

The thermometer in my uncle's church. R. 
Wolfe il 26-28 O 
See also 
Tithing 
STEWART, GEORGE 

N.A. 1 Looking South, rev 53 My 
STOKELY, PETER. FAMILY 

Navaho teaches Navaho. pctl prm 24-27 My 
STOUT. GILBERT G. 
Meditation, por 52 S 
STOWE. J. JOEL, JR. 
Meditation, por 49 Mr 
STUART, JESSE 

Plowshare in Heaven, rev 50 Mr 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Give Schisler awards, ns 68 Ag 
Hi"h-school meditations, ns 69 D 

See also 
Wesley Foundations 
STUDENT LOAN FUND 

$730 worth of gratitude, ns 73 Ag 
SUMMER 

Always in summer. J. Merchant, poem il 
79 Jl 
SUNDAY 

"Blue laws" constitutional, ns 67-68 F 

Broadcast Sundays, ns 72 Ap 

Our wonderful Sunday dinners. H. Croy il 

14-16 My 
Strengthen blue laws, ns 68 D 
Youth group frowns on Sunday sports, ns 
9 Ja 
SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

See Church schools 
SURVIVAL 

To survive man must serve, il 16-17 Mr 
SWANBERG, W. A. 

The Career of An Improbable Rascal, rev 
52 Jl 
SWEDEN 

New churches being built, ns 71 Je 
SWEEPING STATEMENTS 
By Sam the Sexton. 76 Je 



TAFT, CHARLES P. 

We laymen have a charge to keep, por pt 
13 O 
TAYLOR, HENRY J. 

Every day is mother's day. il re 28-29 My 
TAYLOR, TELEFORD 

The March of Conquest, rev 52 F 
TEEN-AGERS 
See Youth 
TEENS TOGETHER 

See each issue 
TEETER, HERMAN B. 

As fiction writers see us. il 101-106 N 
Teen-agers are good risks. T. Robertson as 

told to H. B. Teeter il 32-34 Je 
What we know and believe about Mary, il 
35-36 D 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Bible study by television, pctl 62-65 S 
Christ on the screen. M. Boyd, pctl 20-22 O 
'Ham,' 15, puts CE on air. ns por 71 O 
Is religion on TV a flop? il pw 30-32 F 
New TV series for children, ns 66 Ap 
Radio pairs church, baseball, ns 70 Ag 
Record radio appeal, ns 69 Ap 
Relieion on the beam. J. W. Carty por 
22-24 S 



Religious films in Kansas must be approved 

by state censors, ns 74 Jl 
Religious TV course popular, il ns 69 Ja 
Want better religious TV. ns 70-71 My 
Watch TV— or teach ? ns 74 My 
TELEVISION, RADIO AND FILM COM- 
MISSION 
Deaconesses act in film, ns 72 My 
Films for churches, ns 68 D 
Film tells right from wrong, ns 68 S 
TERRES, JOHN K. 

(comp) The Audubon Book of True Nature 
Stories, rev 51 Ap 
TERRORISM 

Death penalty for terror bombing, ns 11 Jl 
Wanted : way to end hate bombings, ns 65 Ja 
THANE, ELSWYTH 

The Family Quarrel, rev 55 S 
THANKSGIVING 

Thanksgiving prayer, il 1 N '57 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

Dr. Don Holter to head National Methodist 
Theological Seminary, Kansas City, Mo. 
il ns 68 Ja 
Dr. G. O. McCulloh announces record enroll- 
ment, ns 9 F 
Dr. J. W. Dickhaut heads new theological 

school in Ohio, ns 11 My 
50 students at National, ns 70 D 
For Southern California School of Theology: 

$1 million, ns 69 Je 
Hail expansion of seminaries, ns 67 Ap 
More theologues. ns 68 D 

Theologue's day : long, hard, busy, il 32-33 Ap 
Trial year of study under Rockefeller Broth- 
ers Theological Fellowships, ns 69 O 
THOBURN, ISABELLA 

She went to India, por um 55 N 
THOMAS, NORMAN 

The Prerequisites for Peace, rev 53 O 
THOMPSON, NONA BROWN 

She plays it pianissimo, (miniature pianos) 
por ha 60-61 F 
THOMPSON, W. TALIAFERRO 

Adventures in Parenthood, rev 55 Ag 
THURBER, JAMES 

The Years with Ross, rev 54 S 
TIDMARSH, RALPH E. 

Meditation, por 47-48 Ap 
TILLMAN, MRS. J. FOUNT 

Witnesses to the end of the earth, por pt 
13 S 
TITHING 

Miracle Millions for the Mustangs. N. Bigbee 
por 17-19 Ag 
TOGETHER 

14% circulation increase, ns 67 Ja 
Receives award, ns 69 S 
Together: two steps forward, ns 70 Ap 
TOGETHER IN THE HOME 

Cake is to eat. (Working at home) M. Ander- 
son il 28-29 Mr 
'Daddy. I want an ice cream cone!' W. S. 

Calkins, Jr. il 35-36 My 
Family worship works for us. D. L. Yates il 

19-20 D 
Help your children make friends. M. H. De- 
Lapp il 32-33 Ag 
Hospital sojourn — Jr. style. C. L. Schulz il 

23-24 Ja 
How to live dangerously. D. Gault il 17-18 O 
'Just lean on me, grandpa.' D. Van Ark il 

43-44 F 
Let's not rush the youngsters. S. B. Win- 
chester il 29-30 Ap 
Minutes for mischief. H. B. Walters il 28-29 

Jl 
Parents have growing pains, too. B. G. Hale 

il 45-46 Je 
Teach a child to pray. E. P. Turner il 47-48 S 
Together in the first parsonage home. H. 
Johnson il 42-43 N 
TOGETHER WITH THE SMALL FRY 

Albert and the bad news. M. Redfield il 60-61 

S 
The blue-nosed cat. G. M. Bell il 58-59 Mr 
Fun with clothespin puppets, il 66 Je 
Fun with 'squirds' and 'cowbits.' il 59 F 
Just for ducks. H. B. Sanders il 64-65 Jl 
Long ago. il 44-45 N 
Make friends with nature, il 60-61 Ag 
Plan a party — just for birds ! il 57 Ja 
Mr. Baker's cap. M. E. Singleton il 59-60 O 
Pussy willow 'fuzzies.' il 59 Mr 
Fliffo remembers. D. A. Dowdy il 58-59 F 
Special Christmas stars, il 60 D 
The sunshine cake. R. B. Juline il 56-57 Ja 
Terry Turtle tries again. B. Hamm il 62 My 
The youngest cousin. R. B. Juline il 60-61 Ap 
TOWN AND COUNTRY 

Bread from heaven. L. Spear il 17-18 Jl 
Good land=good churchgoers, ns 71 Ag 
Rural Methodist churches under scrutiny, ns 

65 Ap 
"School's end" (at country crossroads) poem 

il 79 My 
Study rural situation for Conference, ns 68 

Ja 
Wants new rural commission, ns 11 Jl 
TOYNBEE, ARNOLD J. 

East to West, rev 53 My 
TRAFCO 

See Television, Radio and Film Commission 
TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

See Safety 
TRALLE, MILLICENT 

Participant in Should churches sell things? 
il pw 23-25 Ap 



TRAVEL 

For people with roving soles . . . (Book list) 
53 My 

Sightseeing in United States. (Book list) il 
53 Je 
TREES 

Pictorial. 35-42 Ap 
TREVER, JOHN C. 

Scholars and scientists piece out the scrolls, 
por 23-24 Je 
TRICE, WILLIAM E. 

Meditation, por 47-48 Ja 
TRUEBLOOD, ELTON 

The Idea of a College, rev 53 D 

They're called retreats, il 30-32 My 
TRUMBULL, ROBERT 

Paradise in Trust, rev 54 Ag 
TUCKER, PARK 

Prison is My Parish, as told to George Burn- 
ham, rev 50 Ja 
TUNLEY, ROUL 

Alcoholism is becoming another headache for 
France, il 33-34 F 
TURNER. ELIZABETH P. 

Teach a child to pray, th il 47-48 S 
TUTTLE. ROBERT G. 

Meditation, por 50-51 Jl 
TURTLES 

Together With the Small Fry. 62-63 My 

U 
UNDERWOOD. RICHARD C. 

Don't be afraid or art. pctl ha 76-79 S 

Hobbies unlimited ! il ha 58-60 Ja 

These bells ring out. pctl 63-65 D 

Up from the nickelodeon ; amateur movie 

making, il ha 58-60 Je 
Where Washington first made history, pctl 
74-77 F 
UNICEF 

See United Nations Children's Fund 
UNITED CHURCH WOMEN 

Aid South Seas women, ns 71 Ja 
UNITED NATIONS 

Admit Red China to UN'.' Churchmen differ. 

ns 9 Ja 
Faces critical issues, il 16 O 
Pastors watch UN work, pctl 64-66 My 
10 Methodists elected to National Council of 

the Atlantic Union Committee, ns 68 Ag 
UN stamps honor London's Central Hall, 
headquarters of British Methodism, il 27 Jl 
UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND 
On Halloween : The Trick is to treat, pctl 
61-64 O 
UNITED STATES 

'My country, 'tis of thee.' (America pctl) 

36-44 Jl 
A sharp look ahead 25 years. W. M. Kip- 
linger il 12-14 Ja 
UNITED STATES— CONGRESS 

Legislation of interest to church people, ns 
68 My 
UNITED STATES— FOREIGN RELATIONS 
Churchmen may tip scale, ns 73 Je 
Faced with problems, ns 113 N 
UNITED STATES— HISTORY 

It was news in 1784. W. C. Grover il por 
22-24 
UPPER ROOM 

Bishop Oxnam receives citation, ns por 73 D 
Bishop Oxnam receives Upper Room award. 

ns 69 Jl 
New Pentecost window, ns 69 Jl 
URBAN 
See 
Cities and Towns 
URIS, LEON 

Exodus, rev 56 Ap 
USHERS 

Church ushers. E. Hosman il 20-21 S 



VALENTINE'S DAY 

Valentine's day. A. Fisher poem tsf 59 F 
VAN ARK, DOROTHY 

'Just lean on me, grandpa.' il th 43-44 F 
VELIE, LESTER 

Labor, U. S. A. rev 54 D 
VILLIERS, ALAN 

Give Me a Ship to Sail, rev 53 Ag 
VIRGIN ISLANDS 

Mission for Puerto Ricans. ns 71 Ja 
VOCATIONS 

Emphasis on church vocations, ns 71 Ja 

Help teens choose careers, ns 68 Ag 
VOLKMAN, HARRY 

Forecast faith, por um 17 Ap 
VON BRAUN, WERNHER 

Missiles and civilization, por 14-16 O 
VON HAGEN, VICTOR WOLFGANG 

(ed) The Incas of Pedro de Cieza de Leon, 
rev 54 O 

W 
WAGNER, ROBERT 

Mayor of New York, por 25 Jl '57 
WAKATAMA, MATHEW 

Pioneer with a purpose, por um 27 Je 
WALDO, MYRA 

Dining Out in Any Language, rev 53 My 



WALKER, MARY ALICE and Harold B. 

Venture of Faith, rev 54 D 
WALKER, STANLEY 

Tricky talk in Texas, il ha 59-60 My 
WALTERS, H. B. 

Minutes for mischief, il th 28-29 Jl 
WALTON, A. J. 

Rural church told to face up to the times, 
por ns 68 O 
WALWORTH, DOROTHY and Bailey, Berna- 
dine 

'He loved me truly.' (Sarah Bush Lincoln) 
il re 24-27 F 
WARD, BARBARA 

Five Ideas That Change the World, rev 63 O 
WARD, HARRIET SHERRILL 

Prairie Schooner Lady, rev 54 D 
WARE, LEON 

The red wagon, il re 21-22 Ap 
WARNES, W. E. 

Pastoral patriarch, por um 29 F 
WARREN, ROBERT PENN 

Remember the Alamo I rev 51 F 
WARRICK, LAMAR S. 

Participant in powwow Can girls reform boys 
after marriage ? por pw 46-47 My 
WASHINGTON, GEORGE 

And so, the Methodist Church starts. J. S. 
Payton pctl 28-37 N 

1789-1959 history repeats, pctl 14-15 N 

Where Washington first made history. R. C. 
Underwood pctl 74-77 F 
WASHINGTON 

A bit of old Japan in Spokane. (Highland 
Park Church) pctl 74-77 Ap 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Religious capital, ns 69 Jl 
WEBB, THOMAS 

And so, the Methodist Church starts. J. S. 
Payton pctl 28-37 N 
WEBB, WALTER PRESCOTT 

An Honest Preface, rev 55 Ag 

The Story of the Texas Rangers, rev 51 F 
WEBSTER, GARY 

Codfish, cats and civilization, rev 52 O 
WECHSLER, HERMAN J. 

(ed) The Pocket Book of Old Masters, rev 
55 S 
WEIDMAN, JEROME 

The Enemy Camp, rev 55 Ja 
WELCH, HERBERT, BISHOP 

At 96 is own beneficiary, il ns 72-73 Jl 

Cokesbury bell salvaged, pctl 94 N 
WELLMAN, PAUL I. 

Gold in California, rev 51 F 
WERNER, HAZEN G., BISHOP 

Christian Family Living, rev 54 My 
WESLEY, JOHN 

And so, the Methodist Church starts. J. S. 
Payton pctl 28-37 N 

Aristocratic Wesley, por pctl 2 Je 

A faith to live by. G. Kennedy il 30-32 Mr 

Help save Epworth Rectory, ns 71 Ap 

His mother called him 'Jackie.' pctl 16-19 N 

Solves a vexing problem, il 50 N 

Wesley at 13. por 2 Je 
WESLEY FOUNDATIONS 

Melody and mileage, pctl 61-64 Ja 
WESLEY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Carve statue of Christ, ns 67 D 

Cokesbury bell salvaged. 94 N 
WEST, HOWARD ROBERT 

(ed) This is the South, rev il 52 O 
WHEATLEY, RONALD 

Operation Sea Lion, rev 49 Ja 
WHITE, T. H. 

The Once and Future King, rev 57-58 My 
WHITEFIELD, GEORGE 

Bust of George Whitefield. pctl 79 D 

Portrait. (Bermuda, land of lilies) 76 Mr 

The three roots of American Methodism. E. 
T. Clark por 25-27 N 
WHITTAKER, JANET 

Participant in Should we tell our children 
we're ex-convicts? por pw 31 Je 
WICKE, LLOYD C, BISHOP 

God in My Life, por rev 54 Jl 
WICKE, MYRON F. 

Participant in Should church-related colleges 
have wide-open doors ? por pw 32-34 S 
WICKED FLEA 

15 Ma ; 34 Ap ; 17 Je ; 36 O ; 18 D 
WIDOWS 

So you're a widow now. E. O. Xan il 34-36 Je 
WILLARD, FRANCES E. 

'First' lady, por um 56 N 
WILLIAMS, DONALD 

A hymn for such a time, il 122-123 N 
WILLIAMS, JAY 

Solomon and Sheba. rev 56 Ag 
WILLS 

Wants churches in wills, ns 67 Ag 
WILSON, ANGUS 

The Middle Age of Mrs. Eliot, rev 58 S 
WILSON, ROBERT 

Christ on the screen. M. Boyd pctl 20-22 O 
WINTER 

Prayer. D. W. Pease il 2 Ja 
WISE, JENNINGS C. 

The Long Arm of Lee. rev. 54 D 
WINCHESTER, SALLY BURKE 

Let's not rush the youngsters, il th 29-30 Ap 



WISEMAN, D. J. 

Illustrations from Biblical Archaeology, por 
rev 54 S. 
WOLFE, REESE 
The thermometer in my uncle's church, il 
26-28 O 
WOMAN'S SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN 
SERVICE 
Heads educational work por ns 68 D 
Let us remember, let us rejoice ! J. O. Gross 

il 87-90 N 
Social relations : new ideas, ns 74 Jl 
States views on national affairs, ns 9 Mr 

See also 
Deaconesses 
WOMEN 

Cheers for the new woman. K. Loring il 

14-16 Ag 
Church and the employed woman, ns 72 My 
Help native women, ns 69 D 
So you're a widow now. E. O. Xan il 34-36 Je 
WOMEN— OCCUPATIONS 

Cake is to eat. (Working at home) M. An- 
derson il th 28-29 Mr 
WOOD, GRANT 

Arbor Day. il 38-39 Ap 
WOOD, JAMES P. 

Of Lasting Interest, rev 56 Jl 
WOODRUFF, HOWARD W. 

Molder of Missionary Fellowship Candle, por 
1 Ja 
WOODRUM, LON 

I didn't ask to be born, il 25 D 
WORDEN, WILLIAM L. 

Why Oregon remembers Jason Lee. il 30-32 
Jl 
WORDS 

Tricky talk in Texas. S. Walker il ha 59-60 

My 
'What's that word again?' ha 60 My 
WORLD COUNCIL OF CHURCHES 
New WCC president, ns 113 N 
To meet in Ceylon, December 1961 
Unity in our diversity, il 72 N 
WORLD METHODIST COUNCIL 
Celebrate 150th anniversary of Methodism's 

Constitution, ns 71 F 
'New life in Spirit.' ns 69-70 D 
Transatlantic pulpit swap, ns 71-72 Jl 
Unity in our diversity, il 72 N 
WORLD SERVICE 
Giving down for first six months, 1958-59. 

ns 68 F 
Methodist funds gain, ns 70 Ag 
WORSHIP 

Church ushers, il 20-21 S 

Commission on Worship wants to revise hym- 
nal, ns 71-72 Ja 
Did we go expecting? R. L. Smith il lse 24 Mr 
Family worship works for us. il th 19-20 D 
The Sunday I forgot my glasses. F. F. Allen 

il 31 Ap 
Worship in our national parks, pctl 37-44 My 
WORTHINGTON, MARJORIE 

Miss Alcott of Concord, rev 52 My 
WRIGHT, CONSTANCE 

Madame de Lafayette, rev 54 D 
WRIGHT, RICHARD 

The Long Dream, rev 58 My 



XAN, ERNA OLESON 

So you're a widow now. il 34-36 Je 



YATES, DOROTHY L. 

Family worship works for us. il th 19-20 D 
YLLA, pseud. 

See Koffler, C. 
YOUR FAITH AND YOUR CHURCH 

Column by T. O. Nail, see each issue 
YOUTH 

Can girls reform boys after marriage? il 

pw 45-48 My 
Caravans visit 140 churches, ns 73 Ag 
The front porch. L. Sheppard il 25-26 Ag 
Let us remember, let us rejoice! J. O. Gross 

il 87-90 N 
Minutes for mischief. H. B. Walters il th 

28-29 Jl 
My 'silent generation.' J. E. Corson por pt 

13 Ag 
Teen-agers are good risks. T. Robertson as 

told to H. B. Teeter il 32-34 Je 
Ten lamps to light my son's path. H. E, 

Richards 72 Jl 
'Twixt Twelve and Twenty, rev 54, 56 My 
Year abroad for teens, ns 66 Ag 
Youth quiz celebrities, ns 67 S 

See also 
Methodist Youth Fellowship 
Methodist Student Movement 
National Conference of Methodist Youth 
Together in the Home 



ZELLEY, EDWARD S., JR. 

Meditation, por 50-51 My 
ZEPP, FRED B. 

How should Methodists organize? il map 17- 
20 My 



TOGETHER regularly runs 80 pages — 16 of them in full color by the offset 
method. Launched in 1956, it now has upwards of one million circulation. 
Individual subscriptions are $4 per year. Orders should be sent to the Business 
Department. TOGETHER Magazine, 740 No. Rush St., Chicago 11, Illinois. 



Together/ 



NOVEMBER. 1959 



NEW YORK Area NEWS Section 



New Y>rk Methodism Rich in History 



New York Area Methodists owe their 
rich historical heritage to the fact that 
transportation facilities 175 years ago 
limited travel to boat and horseback. 
Consequently, New York was the starting 
point for most Methodist activity. 

Elsewhere in the magazine you will 
find the story of the blossoming of 
churches along the Eastern coast and you 
will be interested in the map which 
many New York Area historians have 
helped compile. 

There are many Methodist shrines 
which could not be included on the map 
because of lack of space. Following is a 
partial list: 

New York 

Staten Island: Old Woodrow Church 
site of VanPelt house where Asbury 
preached first sermon in NY. Province, 
November 10, 1771. 

Searingtown: Oldest Methodist building 
in continuous use as church in north- 
eastern area. 

Commac\: Second oldest building in 
continuous use as church. 

Yonhers: Asbury Church in Sherwood's 
Vale where Asbury established a class. 

Kingsboro (near Gloversville) : Camp 
meeting visited by Asbury, home of 
William Clancy. 

Coeymans: Marker on Route 9W indi- 
cates site of stone church completed 1792 
where Asbury preached. 

Peter sburgh: Oldest Methodist church 
in Troy Conference in continuous use 
(1820).' 

Smith field: Bronze plaque on oak tree 
stating George Whitefield preached to 
crowd too large for church (1770). 

Piatt sburgh: Route 37 to St. Regis, trek 
of Asbury to Canada. 

Connecticut 

Norwalkj Jesse Lee preached first ser- 
mon in New England under apple tree. 

Redding, Stratfield: Classes founded by 
Jesse Lee. 

Vermont 

Poitltney: Green Mountain College es- 
tablished 1834. Ralph Waldo Emerson 
among lecturers. Methodism introduced 
into state in this vicinity about 1788. 

Verskire: Joshua Hall sent as mission- 
ary (1794). First circuit in state formed 
1795. 

Bane: Heclding Church named for 
Elijah Hedding assigned to Vermont, 
1805. 

New Jersey 

Morristown: Site of first session of 
Newark Annual Conference, 1858. 

Mount Tabor, Denville: First camp 



meetings (1866, 1869) operated under 
state charter. 

Ncwar\: Franklin Memorial Church is 
descendant of Halsey Street Church, 
founded in 1808, later merged with Cen- 
tral Church to become First Methodist 
Church. 

Asbury: First church named for Bishop 
Asbury who dedicated it in 1796. 

Hackettstown: Home of Centenary Col- 
lege. 

Flanders: Chapel where Asbury 
preached still standing. 

Elizabeth: House of Thomas Morrell 
built in 1735 where early Methodists in- 
cluding Asbury were entertained. 

Chatham: Methodist preaching dates 
back to pre-Revolution days. Major 
Thomas Morrell began his ministry here. 

Waldwic\: Originally known as 
Paramus Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Richard Whatcoat was first recorded 
preacher (1791). Six present Newark 
Conference churches developed from this. 

New Faces — New Places 

New Yoi\ East Conference: the Rev. 
George A. Ackerly to supply West Haven, 
Conn.; the Rev. Ronald S. Law to Fair- 
field, Conn. 

Ncwar\: the Rev. Kenneth Fowler to 
supply Diamond Hill; the Rev. Weldon S. 
Crowley to Sandyston and Wallpack; 
the Rev. Kenneth H. Ahl t:i Mount Free- 
dom. 




Royal 



Mr. Keidel 



Keidel Named Chaplain 
at Methodist Hospital 

The Rev. Keith W. Keidel, former 
resident chaplain at Englewood (N.J.) 
Hospital, has been named house chaplain 
at the Methodist Hospital of Brooklyn. 

He will serve as pastor and counselor 
to both patients and staff members. 

Mr. Keidel was educated at Muskingum 
College, in Ohio, and Garrett Biblical 
Institute. He served seven years at chap- 
lain at New Jersey State Hospital. 




Kelly 



Forty-jour New Yor\ Conference Methodists traveled by bus to the National Convoca- 
tion of Youth at Purdue University. Shown here with their counselors, they heard 
addresses and panel discussions on the theme, "Man's Need and God's Action." 



A-l 




&%ecv Ttecte 




Picture courtesy of Ed Schultz, Union Star 

Miss Carol Youmans, queen of the New York State Fair, is congratulated by 
Governor Rockefeller. As Miss Schenectady County, she was one oj 156 contestants 
vying jor the title. She is a member oj Fisher Methodist Church and former MYFcr. 



Vvte Glnaut Wnitesi 



Long-distance visitors last summer in- 
cluded the Rev. Donald T. Keil of Rhine- 
beck, N.Y., who preached in Chugiak and 
Douglas, Alaska; the Rev. and Mrs. 
William Perry of Schenectady who toured 
several countries in Europe; and the Rev. 
Frederick W. Vogell of Troy who visited 
13 European countries. 

Celebrating anniversaries: Fishs Eddv, 
N.Y., 75th, with the Rev. Donald S. 
Stacey of Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, 
as the speaker . . . Brewster, N.Y., 125th 
with Dr. Ralph Sockman and Bishop 
Newell speaking . . . Putnam Vallev, 
N.Y., 125th. 

The Rev. Dr. Lynn Harold Hough 
celebrated his 82nd birthday September 
10 by sailing from England on the Queen 
Mary. He preached last summer at St. 
Columba's Church of Scotland and at 
City Temple in London. 

The Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Sockman of 
New York is one of six ministers cited 
by The Christian Century as "outstand- 
ing representatives of the contemporary 
Protestant pulpit." 

Morning Collects for August services 
at first Church, Rensselaer, N.Y., were 
written by members of the Confirmation 
Class. Those who participated were Bar- 
bara Hedden, John Hall, Sharon Peters, 
LeRov Bruce, Robert and Richard Beza. 



When Pound Ridge, N.Y., parishioners 
received a postal card saying simply 
"Thanks" and bearing the imprint of 
lips revealing a short front tooth, they 
knew they were being thanked for their 
contributions to a gift for their departing 
pastor, the Rev. William Stuclwell. The 
distinctive tooth is the "signature" of the 
committee chairman and lay leader, Carl 
S. Harris. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Hermans of 
Rowe Church, Milan, N.Y., have as their 
guest Miss Ho Cwat Lie, exchange stu- 
dent from Malang, East Java, Indonesia. 

Need a bell? Grace Church, Dover, N.J. 
has a beautifully toned one to sell. The 
main supports of the tower must be re- 
paired and the bell is so large and heavy 
that it must be removed. If you are in- 
terested, communicate with the Rev. Ann 
S. Hayden. 

The Rev. Dr. William L. Lancey of 
Morristown, N.J., is on a six weeks' 
preaching mission in Europe. 

Miss Carol Wright of the Bethel, Conn., 
Church has entered Tennessee Wesleyn 
College to begin training to become a 
deaconess. 

The Wesley Society met October 9-10 
at Camp Morris, near Budd Lake, N.J., 
with Professor Gordon Harland of Drew 
and the Rev. Wesley Sheffield of Mas- 
sapequa Park, N.Y., as the speakers. 



Dr. James F. Ross, an expert on the 
Old Testament, has joined the faculty 
of the Theological School as an assistant 
professor. He came from Dartmouth 
College where he was chairman of the 
religion department and a member of 
the Faculty Research Committee. 

Kinmoth W. Jefferson and David S. 
Steinmetz of the theological school, were 
among the 20 award-winning Methodist 
seminary students who visited the na- 
tional boards and agencies of The Meth- 
odist Church in five cities recently. 

Six thousand students in Warsaw, 
Poland, are enrolled in the Methodist 
English Language College directed by Dr. 
Joseph Szczepkowski, a graduate of the 
Drew Theological School. 

Dr. Edward C. Peterson, who formerly 
taught in the department of religious 
education, has been named editor of 
children's publications of the Editorial 
Division of the Methodist General Board 
of Education, in Nashville, Tenn. 

Dr. Donald F. Ebright, graduate of the 
theological school, is the first president 
of Alaska Methodist University in 
Anchorage. 

Dr. Joy B. Phillips associate professor 
of zoology at the College of Liberal Arts, 
presented a paper on The Synthesis and 
Storage oj Thyrotoplun in the F.mbryo 
of the Chicl{ a!! <l ^ l,! before the Amer- 
ican Society of Zoologists at the Amer- 
ican Institute of Biological Sciences, 
Pennsylvania State University. 

Thirty Nurses Capped 

Thirty nurses were in the precessional 
September 13 at the Hanson Place Cen- 
tral Methodist Church for the 70th 
graduation service of the Methodist 
Hospital of Brooklyn. 

Joseph R. Ferry, president of the hos- 
pital, presided and Dr. Robert Allan 
Moore, president and dean of the Down- 
state Medical Center, College of Medicine 
in Brooklyn, State University of New 
York, was the principal speaker at the 
service. 



NOVEMBER. 1959 Vol. 3. No. II 

TOGETHER is an official organ of The Methodist 

Church, issued monthly by the Methodist Publishing 

House, 740 N. Rush St., Chicago II. III. Publisher: 

Lovick Pierce. 

New York Area — Bishop Frederick B. Newell. 

Area Edition Editor — Mrs. Margaret F. Oonaldson, 

150 Fifth Avenue, New York II, N.Y. 



Subscriptions: Order through your local Methodist 
church. Basic rate under All-Family Plan is 65tf a 
quarter ($2.60 a year) billed to the church. Individual 
subscriptions are $4 a year in advance. Single copy 
price. 50c\ 

Second-class postage has been paid at Chicago. III., 
and at additional mailing offices. 



A-2 



Together/ November 1959 



Bethany Hospital Plans 
Many Events 

Plans for ground-breaking ceremonies 
and for the second phase of a $750,000 
fund-raising campaign for a new six- 
story wing have been mapped by the 
directors of Bethany Deaconess Hospital, 
237 St. Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

The Rev. Norman O. Edwards, hos- 
pital administrator, announced that the 
first goal in the hospital's drive for funds 
to erect the new building, has been 
reached. New plans will be made to 
appeal to the community and to the 269 
churches in the New York East Confer- 
ence of The Methodist Church for as- 
sistance. 

* * 

Representatives of 269 Methodist 
churches are expected to take part in the 
annual Donation Day of the hospital 
November 8 at the Community Methodist 
Church of Ozone Park. Directors will 
be elected, the president and administra- 
tor will give their annual reports and 
donations will be received from churches 
and friends. 

Bethany played host to lay leaders 
representing 269 Methodist churches at 
a luncheon of the Board of Lay Activities 
of the New York East Conference. The 
Rev. Dr. Edwards welcomed the guests 
and Louis Hauser, a member of the hos- 
pital's Board of Directors, and the Con- 
ference lay leader, was in charge of the 

meeting. 

* # * 

More than 400 women attended a 
luncheon and card party sponsored by 
the Women's Auxiliary of the hospital 
at the Victorian House. Glendale. Funds 
from the fete will be used in the ex- 
pansion of the hospital's charitable efforts. 

* # * 

Members of the New York East Con- 
ference should learn all they can about 
the work done by Bethany. 




THE BISHOP WRITES 




c4 Call to J\emember 



The Council of Bishops has summoned The Methodist 
Church to commemorate the 175th anniversary of its 
founding in the United States during the week beginning 
December 27, 1959. 

Our Church was formally organized at Lovely Lane 
Chapel in Baltimore, Maryland, in the Christmas season 
of 1784, at which time Francis Asbury and Thomas Coke 
were chosen as our first bishops. At that Conference, 
plans were made for the founding of our first college, 
for the establishment of the Methodist Book Concern, 
and the basic structure of our ecclesiastical system was carefully and prayerfully 
laid out. 

It is fitting that in harmony with this call from the Council of Bishops. 1 
should send this reminder to all of the ministers and to the laity of the New 
York Area. May I urge that during the month of December, in addition to 
celebrating the birth of our Lord, we rededicate ourselves to the revitalizing 
of our Church, particularly in this New York Area. Let us remind ourselves 
that the world and the nation are passing through difficult times even as they 
were when the Church was founded just after the American Revolution, and 
let us be duly conscious of the spiritual contribution which our forefathers 
in the faith made to the establishment of this new nation. 

Methodism was born in America through the inspired leadership of Barbara 
Heck and Philip Embury, Captain Thomas Webb, Jesse Lee, Freeborn Garrett- 
son, Bishop Francis Asbury, and many other great leaders who brought to this 
country the spiritual vision of its founder, John Wesley. They made sacrifice 
after sacrifice for the establishment of our interpretation of the faith. They lived 
lives of holiness. They preached a vital religious experience. They held before 
the people of this nation the virtues of spiritual experience and moral behavior. 
I earnestly suggest that as we come to the 175th anniversary of our founding in 
the month of December, we remind ourselves constantly of the unique signifi- 
cance of our Church, its glorious heritage and its power to meet the needs 
of an age like this. 




The Rev. .V. O. Edwards, hospital admin- 
istrator of Bethany Deaconess Hospital. 

November 1959\Together 



Seven Scouts received God and Country 
in aids in Centerport, N.Y., after two 
years' wor\ with the Rev. Joseph P. 
Geary, shown with advisor Max Fields. 
left, and Donald Harned. Scout repre- 



sentative. Scouts are: front row, from 
left, Eric Fields. Gerry Anderson, Alan 
Budde; second rote. Bruce Elfast, Richard 
Gutting and Eric Luces. Robert Grouse 
teas absent when the picture teas taken. 

A-3 




Mr. Esdon 






Miss Holcombc 




Dr. Durum 



Miss Willi u 



Mr. Dewey 



Five Go to Mission Fields 

Five area residents are among 31 young 
adults beginning three years' service as 
missionaries overseas. They received six 
weeks' training at Scarritt College. 
Robert Esdon of East Hardwick, Vt., 
will go to Pakistan, Miss Fern Holcombe 
of Milton, Vt., and Miss Lois E. Williams 
of Mount Vernon, N.Y., will go to 
Japan, Glenn H. Dewey of Wardsboro, 
Vt., will go to Cuba, and Dr. Mary E. 
Dumm of New York City will go to 
India. 

Student Ministry Cited 

A student missionary provided by the 
Micldleburgh Church for a neighboring 
parish has proved successful as "in-servicc- 
training," the Rev. Joel W. Shippey, 
Middleburgh pastor reports. 

It has also resulted in progress for two 
churches, the Huntersland Methodist 
and the Congregational Christian 
churches as the Rev. Richard D. Camp- 
bell, a Drew University theological stu- 
dent, organized a church school, youth 




\ 



The one that didn't get away I The Rev. 
Lowell M. Atkinson of Englewood, N.J., 
is shown with a il x /i pound striped bass 
he caught trolling out of Highlands, N.f. 

A-4 



fellowship groups and a worship-hour 
nursery. He baptized 32 persons in his 
12-week period of service. 

District Superintendent C. Walter 
Kessler, has suggested that a licensed lay 
preacher continue the work this winter 
and another student minister be obtained 
next summer. ■ 




The Rev. Ira M. Wheatley, new chaplain 
at Green Mountain College, Poultncy, Vt. 

New Horizons 

• The Church of the Tarrytowns is en- 
gaged in a tripple-phasecl program in- 
cluding a $29,000 renovation, $21,000 to 
pay the parsonage mortgage, and the 
purchase of an adjacent apartment house 
to provide additional land. 

• The foundation walls for the new par- 
ish building at Flanders, N.J., are being 
constructed by volunteer labor. They 
hope to have the building enclosed and 
heating installed before cold weather. 

• For the first time in more than 100 
years of service, Johnsonburg, N.J., Meth- 
odists expect to have a resident pastor. 
The congregation is buying the property 
of the Christian Church — including a 
parsonage. 

Construction Under Way 

• A new sanctuary with a seating capa- 
city of 320 is under construction in 
McKownville, N.Y., and is expected to 
be ready for occupancy January 1. Cost 
will be $170,000. A lounge-overflow area 
which will seat 100, choir rooms, offices, 



and 16 classrooms will be included. The 
completion of the project will coincide 
with the 100th anniversary of the church 
school. 

• Major improvements are being made in 
Lyndhurst, N.J., in preparation for the 
70th anniversary in 1960. The sanctuary 
and parsonage have been redecorated 
inside and out. The pulpit and choir 
loft have been restored. New lights, 
carpet, and organ have been installed. 
The church was founded in 1891 as the 
Kingsland Methodist Episcopal Church. 

• Ground has been broken for a new 
education building at St. Paul's Church, 
Hartford, Conn. 

• A $136,000 education wing is being 
constructed at Slingerlands, NY. 

• The Denville, N.J., church has con- 
ducted a successful campaign far $83,000 
toward the erection of the first unit of 
a new church. 

• Bayville, NY., has completed plans 
for a new $110,000 church. An unusual 
feature of the building is a "cry-room" 
where parents with small children may 
view the services through a plate-glass 
window. 




The captain of a Saranac La\e steamer 
is married aboard ship by the Rev. Dr. 
Lionel R. Driscoll. The bride and groom 
are Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Martin. 

Together/November 1959 



"fogether 



A Sharp Look Ahead— 25 Years 

By W. M. KIPLINGER 

Methodism's Stake in Alaska 

Eight pages in full color 



\A* MiXm^vU, Mas^e^Ut* lo* MUU<y<LuU Qa^aUesi jfans+aA^ /959 






Largest candle in 
Methodism \eeps growing 
as Mr. Woodruff adds more 
wax from a far mission. 



A Nigerian student, 

Daniel Ebong, lights the 

candle which burned throughout 

the Fayetteville conference. 



J. HE CANDLE is six feet tall and weighs 125 pounds. 

Into it went wax from 1,554 candles that have burned in Methodist mis- 
sionary outposts all over the world. One piece came from an Austrian 
refugee camp, another from a candle used in the Belgian Congo at Christmas 
time. One glowed in 1923 in the kindergarten of the Hiroshima Girls' 
school. From Malaya, Japan, India, Panama — even from five Methodist con- 
ferences behind the Iron Curtain — missionaries have sent drippings, slivers 
and pieces. With the wax left over, a two-foot replica was made. 

The composite Missionary Fellowship Candle was molded by the Rev. 
Howard W. Woodruff, pastor of Watson Memorial Methodist Church, 
Independence, Mo., to symbolize the church's missionary outreach. It was 
first lighted last August at a missionary conference on Mt. Sequoyah near 
Fayetteville, Ark. Since then it has burned at other conferences. These pic- 
tures were taken at the church in Independence, Mo. The candle also will 
be lighted at Buck Hill Falls, Pa., when the Joint Section of Education and 
Cultivation of the Board of Missions meets there January 9-24. 

"Our large candle was dyed red to symbolize the blood and fire of 
Christian zeal" says Mr. Woodruff. "Today our witness lights for Christ are 
burning in more than 42 countries of the world. This great candle brings us 
all together in one great fellowship!' 









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Our rather, as we look out uf>on 
the beauty or the iorest in winter, 
may its stillness enter our hearts. 
Remove the shackles oi uncertainty, 
oi irenzied living, oi pettiness, 
that laith, hof>e, and love may abide. 

Dorothy Wells Pease 

From Meditations Under the Sky, © 1957, Abingdon 



^7 



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Is thy heart right, as my heart is 
with thine? Dost thou love and 
serve God? It is enough. I give thee 
the right hand of fellowship. 

— John Wesley (1703-1791) 



T. 



HERE are three things everybody thinks he can do 
better than the other fellow — build a fire, run a hotel, 
and coach a football team." 

In his recent book, Bury Me in an Old Press Box 
(A. S. Barnes, $3.75), sports writer Fred Russell credits 
that remark to Bob Higgins of Penn State. Russell, a 
dedicated Methodist layman who presents his third 
annual All-American Methodist grid teams on pages 
25-27, has a few observations to make on the Game of 
Life. "The Referee explained the rules; the rules got 
broken right off the bat; a penalty was inflicted . . . 
banishment forever from the Garden, and the guilty man 
would henceforth have to wo>\ for a living. You can 
look it up yourself if you don't believe me." 

One day last June an old grad named Willard M. 
Kiplinger went back to deliver the commencement ad- 
dress at Ohio State University. He enjoyed talking to 
the students that day, telling them many of the things 
you'll find in his A Sharp Loo\ Ahead 25 Years [page 
12 j. For Kiplinger has been looking ahead, professionally, 
for almost 40 years. Businessmen learned about his fore- 
casting abilities away back in 1923 when he founded and 
became editor of the Kiplinger Washington Letter. Later, 
the noted reporter-editor found an even wider audience 
in his magazine, Changing Times, where he still looks 
ahead — with amazing accuracy and reliability. 

If a certain state we dearly love must take a back 
seat to Alaska in size, Fort Wayne, Ind., also must make 
room on the platform for Methodists of the Big Gountry. 
A while back, we announced Fort Wayne as the first 
U.S. district to adopt Together's All Family Plan of 
subscribing [Ft. Wayne Shows the Way, October, 1958, 
page 1|. Now the Rev. Fred McGinnis of Anchorage, 
superintendent of the Alaska Methodist Mission, relays 
the great news that Alaska has become the first state to 
adopt the All Family Plan! 

So, appropriately, all Alaska Methodists will receive 
this issue, which devotes eight color pages to Methodism's 
Stake in the Newest State [page 35]. And to introduce 
it, our cover shows salmon fishermen at work plying 
their trade as vigorously as did the disciples of old — so 
vigorously, in fact, that the territory we bought for $7.2 
million has returned $2 billion in salmon alone! 

— Your Editors. 



Manuscripts: Authors should enclose postage for return — and address 
all editorial correspondence to the Editorial DepartmiiNT. 
Advertising: For rates, write to the Advertising Department. 
Subscriptions: Order through your local Methodist church. The basic 
rate under the All Family Plan is 5U<* a quarter (S2 a year) billed to 
„,*'», mc church. Individual subscriptions (and group orders not 

qualifying for the All Family rate) are $3 a year in advance. 

Single-copy price is 35$. 

Change of Address: Five weeks' advance notice is required. 
Send old and new address and mailing label from current issue to the 
fa siM ss Office. 

Second-class postage for Together has been paid at Chicago. 111.. 
and at additional mailing offices. 



January 19590\Together 









13 



In this issue: 

Its Gleam Lights the World 
Attention Camera Fans! 
Lesson for the Living 
A Sharp Look Ahead 25 Years 
Europe Is Pulling Together 



1 

(Announcement) 4 

Ed Beck 11 

W. M. Kiplinger 12 

Paul-Henri Spaak 15 



Meet the Quolls of Athens, Tenn. 

i People Called Methodists) 18 



Hospital Sojourn — Jr. Style 
All-American Elevens 



Cecilia L. Schulz 23 
Fred Russell 25 



What of the 'Right to Work' Laws? 
(Midmonth Powwow) 
Victor C. Reuther, Clement D. Johnston 28 

Are 'Foreign' Missions Through? E Stanley Jones 32 

Methodism's Stake in the Newest State 

(Color Pictorial) 35 
Little Boy Meets God Allegra McBirney 43 



Song for the Ages 
Hobbies Unlimited! 
Melody and Mileage 
News of the World Parish 



52 



Richard C. Underwood 58 

(Pictorial) 61 

9, 65 



Happy Hours for Franz und Gretchen (Color Pictorial) 74 



OTHER FEATURES AND DEPARTMENTS 



Letters 6 

Spiritual Efficiency 17 

Your Faith and Church 31 



Looks at Books 
A Prayer 
Browsing in Fiction 



Getting Along Together 44 Small Fry 

Teens Together 45 Methodist Almanack 

Looks at Movies 46 Amen Corner 

Light Unto My Path 47 Photo Credits 



49 
54 
55 
56 
66 
70 
72 



IbCJQihGr, the Midmonth Magazine 
for Methodist Families, is published at: 

740 N. RUSH ST., CHICAGO 11, ILL. 



JANUARY, 1959 



VOL. 3, NO. 1 



TOGETHER is an official monthly organ of The Methodist 
Church, published on the 15th of the month preceding 
month-of-issue by the Methodist Publishing House. Because 
of freedom of expression given authors, opinions do not 
necessarily reflect concurrence by The Methodist Church. 

Editor: Leland D. Case • Managing Editor: Fred R. Zepp • 
Art Editor: Floyd A. Johnson • Associate Editors: Helen 
Johnson, Charles E. Munson, H. B. Teeter • Editorial As- 
sistants: John Baker (art), Else Bjornstad (research), Judy 
Johnson (production), Frances Zehr (news.) • Contributing 
Editors: Newman S. Cryer, Jr., T. Otto Nail, Roy L. Smith, 
Myrtle R. Walgreen • Business Manager: Warren P. Clark 
• Advertising Manager: John H. Fisher 

Copyright 1959 by Lovick Pierce, Publisher. 



Attention 
Camera Fans! 



Together V readers helped us earn 

this bronze medal, showing George Washington 

kneeling in prayer. It was awarded by the 

Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge in honor of 

America the Beautiful, another photo feature 

made up of color transparencies from readers. 





*J%7?, 



i£Sist-GtZ*r 



YOUNG New Englander Samuel F. Smith 
became a Baptist preacher the same year he 
wrote America for a children's Fourth of 
July celebration at a Boston church — 1832. 
He didn't have a new tune for his verses; 
he merely set them to an 18th-century air 
that happens also to be Britain's national 
anthem. And though he already had written 
several of the many popular hymns he was 
to write during his lifetime, he could hardly have dared dream 
that in years to come his America would become one of the first 
songs American children learn to pipe in public or Sunday school 
— that it would be warbled by women's clubs, boomed out by men's 
groups, quavered by oldsters, and sung wistfully by homesick 
Americans abroad. But because America has become perhaps the 
favorite patriotic song of the American people, Together has chosen 
it as the theme for a new color pictorial feature on this land of ours. 
And we want you readers to be the editors of this feature by sharing 
the color transparencies you have taken which you feel catch the 
spirit of the old hymn's stirring phrases. This will be Together's 
third great pictorial feature based on readers' photos. Last May 
you helped us show the life of The Christian Family at WorI{, Play, 
Love, and Worship. In August, 1957, your photos pictured America 
the Beautiful so eloquently that it brought Together an honor award 
from the Freedoms Foundation. Now we are counting on you to 
help us develop a third equally inspiring color pictorial feature 
around America. 



Check your files for color transparencies (not prints or the orange-colored 
negatives from which Kodacolor prints are made) that catch the spirit of 
America. Or take new pictures to illustrate its phrases. Send us as many 
slides as you wish, but with return postage please. For any 35-mm slide 
used we'll pay $25, for larger transparencies $35 with all reproduction rights 
becoming the property of Together. We'll take all reasonable care in handling 
and will return those not published. All transparencies must be received by 
February 10, 1959. But don't wait! Send yours today to: 

PHOTO EDITOR, TOGETHER, 740 N. RUSH ST., CHICAGO 11, ILL. 






MS 7 



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TogetheryJanuary 1959 




V 



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My God Is Real, Amazing Grace, I'd Rather 
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January 1959\Together 




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Parents 1 Eyes Opened 

(Name withheld) 

This drawing is entirely the work of 
our seven-year-old — in response to 
your invitation for children's drawings 
[see November color pictorial]. We send 
it because she asked us to — not because 
we expect it to be published! 




MONEY', 



J 



It teaches us one thing— that our 
home emphasis has been too much on 
money and not enough on the spiritual. 
Now we shall endeavor to improve the 
situation. 

Ordinarily we publish letters with 
names of authors, of course. But to 
cause no embarrassment to anyone, 
we make an exception in this case. 
We are sure other parents will read 
with interest and heed with zeal. — Eds. 

More Short Stories? 

MRS. ENOCH B. LARSON 

Leavenworth, Wash. 

The November issue was a disappoint- 
ment. Of 74 pages, 10 were given to 
children's crayon drawings. Granted, 
you are publishing a family magazine 
and the subject was a good one. But 
couldn't we have more reprints of 
short stories, perhaps more on Methodist 
mission work, and more about Methodist 
colleges and Wesley Foundations? 

Together Goes to College 

NINA SUE DUGGER 

Fort Worth, Tex. 

Together has been a rich source of 
supplementary reading for myself and 
other members of a class in "Marriage 



Selected Bits from Your 

Letters 



and Family Living" here at Texas 
Wesleyan College. Many of these articles 
have served as the basis for interesting 
classroom discussions. 

Champagne Unlimited? 

GERTRUDE BECKER 

Indian School 

Flandreau, S.D. 

I was very happy to see the December 
issue, as usual. The lovely pictures, the 
good reading, and the inspiration that 
it always brings. 

Then my eyes hit Drinking on Air- 
lines? [page 26]. I read it and noted 
one paragraph said that only two drinks 
of champagne were allotted on Western 
Airlines. I went off the rocket there. 
Once a man sitting next to me had 
four drinks — each time being served by 
the stewardess without his asking. 
Another time the little old man across 
from me had his glass filled six times. 
So the "two drinks" is out! 

Re: Moslems and Christians 

PERRY O. HANSON 

Iola, Kan. 

Moslem and Christian Can Be Friends 
[November, 1958, page 18] inspires me 
to write a few words. I lived for 40 
years just over the wall from a great 
Moslem community in China. Yes, 
Christians and Moslems all believe in 
God; St. James (2:19) states that even 
devils do also. We are Christians and it 
is the Christ part that puts us in a 
different category from Moslems. 

Of course, Christians and Moslems 
can be friends, but it is quite another 
matter to talk about co-operation. 
Moslems today are in a great missionary 
campaign to win converts. Jesus said, 
"No one cometh unto the Father but 
by me," and so it is for every Christian 
to be increasingly interested in leading 
the followers of Mohammed into a 
knowledge of Jesus, not as a prophet 
but as the Savior of the world. 

Bro. Van' Did Preach in Saloon 

ROBERT W. LIND, Pastor 

Denton, Mont. 

I am writing in response to several 
letters in Together [November, pages 
8-9] on the question of where "Brother 
Van" held his first service in Montana. 

Because I am in the process of writing 
a book on his life and work, I have in 
my possession some authoritative mate- 
rials, including a great many things 
written by Brother Van himself. In 



Together/January 1959 



them I find evidence that Brother Van 
frequently preached in saloons, and was 
the good friend of many of the saloon 
men in Montana Territory. But he did 
not preach in a saloon on his first Sun- 
day in Montana! 

'Balanced Boy' Identified 

MERLE ZANE BAGLEY 

Redlands, Calij. 

You are to be congratulated on the 
presentation of Roy Coble in Unusual 
Methodists [November, 1958, page 28]. 
Who is the "balanced boy" standing on 
his head? I can tell you. He is David 
Umbach, son of Prof. William Umbach, 
who teaches German at the University 
of Redlands. 



Thank you. We wondered — and are 
- many readers did, too. — Eds. 



sure 



More Study, Less Work? 

SAM COLE 

Hartfield, Va. 

The advice given by Dr. Richmond 
Barbour to D. D.'s question about work- 
ing one's way through college [Teens 
Together, October, 1958, page 43] is 
misleading. His reply is true for second- 
rate colleges and universities but in the 
first-class schools required reading has 
been increased so much that one can- 
not work and do his studies as the 
professor requires. Today one must be 
a scholar and not one who is merely 
studying for a position. 

What Protestants Need . . . 

FRANK AND JEAN HANAWALT 

Seattle, Wash. 

Thank you for your excellent article 
on Why Don't Methodists Have Paro- 
chial Schools? [November, 1958, page 
30]. Both as people working in the 
public-school system and as Methodist 
parents, we are grateful for this objec- 
tive, clear statement of the case. 

We feel, as Protestants, that we need 
many more such articles presented in 
this unemotional, factual way that help 
us to understand our beliefs and 
practices. So often, we feel strongly 
about something and know we are right, 
but lack the information to support our 
case. We do not want to quarrel with 



Correction 

The artist of Adoration of the 
Shepherds, on page 1 of Together 
for December, 1958, was incorrect- 
ly identified as Bartolome Murillo, 
a Spanish artist. Instead, the 
caption should have noted that 
this painting is from the school 
and workshop of the Bassanos, an 
Italian family of artists who lived 
in the 16th and 17th centuries. 
— Eds. 




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The Harold Ames family hits plenty 
of high notes— in music and cooking ! 
Of course, Mrs. Ames is the prize- 
winning cook of the family, and here 
she and daughter Beth take time out 
to show off her awards. Mrs. Ames, 
of Clark's Summit, won all ten last 
year at the Pennsylvania Farm 
Show and Fall's Overfield Fair. 

Of course busy Mrs. Ames uses 
Fleischmann's Active Dry Yeast. 
"It's fast and easy," she says, "really 
dependable." 

You cooks who bake at home will 
be making holiday treats with 



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so fast and easy, and keeps for 
months on your shelf. Holiday time 
is a good time to try the new pizza 
recipe, too— it's right on the Fleisch- 
mann package. And so easy . . . just 
add yeast to biscuit mix for real 
Italian pizza crust. Get Fleisch- 
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others' rights to believe and worship 
God as they see fit, but if we are to 
give our children a firm faith, we need 
to understand it with a foundation of 
facts. 

Raiders — and a Hymn 

CHAPLAIN T. J. KLEINHANS 

Sioux City Air Base, Iowa 

Fast Falls the Eventide [November, 
1958, page 33] overlooks a personal 
problem in the life of Henry Lyte. An 
Anglican, his church had just been 
raided for members by the Plymouth 
Brethren, who claimed certain ties with 
the Wesleys. Almost his whole choir left. 
These he memorialized with the phrases, 
"When other helpers fail" and "O Thou, 
who changest not." When the hymn 
was published, he sent copies not only 
to his church members but to those 
who had left him. 

A Tremendous Trifle 

MRS. W. A. McCULLOUGH 
Van Nuys, Calif. 

I have just laid down the November 
Together which I read with interest, as 
always. But in the hymn Fast Falls the 
Eventide, a favorite of mine, there was 
something that did not ring true. As I 
read it again I noted the error in the 
third verse. What power in a single 
letter! 

Sorry. Our proofreaders blinked and 
the office gremlin did his worst! "Fail" 
of course should have been "foil." — Eds. 

Rader . . . Fighting Sky Pilot 

MARI SANDOZ 

Ellsworth, Neb. 

My sister, Mrs. Robert Pifer of Gor- 
don, Neb., sends me your Barnabas re- 
view of my book, The Cattlemen, 
[November, 1958, page 55] and I note 
the request for additional information 
about "Reverend Rader" of Buffalo, 
Wyo., who sided with homesteaders in 
the Johnson County War of 1892. 

Old-timers never called this man any- 
thing but "Reverend Rader" or "The 
Rev" in my interviews with them. But 
the foreword of the 1935 Grabhorn 
Press edition of A. S. Mercer's Banditti 
of the Plains (republished in 1955 by 
University of Oklahoma Press, $2) 
has him as the Rev. M. A. Rader, who 
was "a Methodist divine of Buffalo who 
became popular after he thrashed a 
cattleman in a street brawl!" 

No doubt the Methodists of Buffalo 
could give you an account of this fight- 
ing Methodist. There is a great story in 
these frontier Methodist sky pilots from 
the Rio Grande to Canada! 

I am pleased with Together, particu- 
larly with the material on nature, on 
other peoples, and on the United Na- 
tions. I am convinced that the whole 
man — the whole being — is always aware 



of his kinship with the ground he walks 
on, and with all the world, and the 
peoples that the sun sees in his travels. 
It is this meaning of the title Together 
that I like. 

A thank you — and a sweep of the 
editorial sombrero to the author of Old 
Jules and many another classic of the 
Old West.— Eds. 

Parole Brings the Problems! 

CHAPIN D. FOSTER 
Tacoma, Wash. 

My congratulations on William L. 
Worden's splendid article, They Wear 
the 'Yoke' Behind Walls [August, page 
12]. 

I know something of the work going 
on at McNeil Island Penitentiary and 
feel this Yokefellow program is one of 
the most constructive activities carried 
forward in an institution which is trying 
to make rehabilitation mean some- 
thing. But it calls for more co-operation 
on the outside than is often accorded. 
Very often men participating in such 
programs as Yokefellows need most 
of all a decent chance to make good 
when paroled. 

Thanks, All, for Vol. I. No. I! 

EDWARD M. NOLAS 

Charlotte, N.C. 

Thanks to your announcement last 
June, my Together collection is now 
complete. More gratifying than that is 





J 



Nolas: He's a first-issue collector. 

the fact that we have so many kind 
readers. To date I have received 135 
copies of Vol. I, No. I, and offers of 
80 more. 

It has become impossible for me to 
answer all these letters and to write 
and personally thank each person that 
has sent me a copy. Please relieve me 
of this responsibility by publishing my 
heartfelt appreciation. 

We're delighted that Mr. Nolas' "yelp 
for help" brought such an outpouring. 
He has sent us some of his extra Vol. 
I, No. I's — so we can supply copies to 
other readers seeking them. — Eds. 



Together/January 1959 



Tbgcthcr / NEWSLETTER 



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ADMIT R ED CHIN A TO UN? Churchmen differ on admitting 
Red China to the UN. The World Order Study Conference, 
sponsored by the National Council of Churches, recently 
recommended a UN seat for the Chinese Reds, plu.s U.S. 
recognition of the regime. The recommendation — which, 
its authors said, does not imply approval of Communist 
policy in China — drew immediate fire from some church 
leaders. The Rev. Norman Vincent Peale, Bishop Herbert 
Welch, and Gen. Robert Eichelberger were among those 
who criticized the Conference stand. On the other 
hand, some Methodist groups already have gone on record 
as favoring seating Red China in the UN. [For pro and 
con views see Sho uld the United Nati ons Admi t R ed 
China? March, 1957, page 24.] 

NONPOLITICAL FARM AID. Bishop Gerald H. Kennedy of 
Los Angeles is in Africa this month looking into farm 
machinery needs there. He is one of five incorporators 
of "Agricultural Aids Foundation" organized by 
Methodist layman Keith Smith, Long Beach, Calif., to 
buy and ship new types of simple farm machinery to 
underprivileged countries. 

CHOOSE METHODIS TS TO RUN HOSP ITAL. The Hoist on 

Conference and national Methodist Boards of Hospitals 
and Homes will operate the $3 million hospital now under 
construction at the Atomic Energy Commission community 
of Oak Ridge, Term. People of the community voted 
4,209 to 2,950 to give the 175-bed hospital to the 
Methodists to run. Congress has ordered the government 
to relinquish control over all community installations 
by 1960. 

METHODIS T MEMBERSHIP UP 1.51 PER CENT. The Methodist 
Church in the U.S. and its territories during 1958 had a 
net gain in membership of 1.31 per cent, or 125,287 
members, over 1957. The official count by the church's 
statistician places the total membership now at 
9,691,916 compared with the 1957 figure of 9,566,629. 
The increase was a little better than that shown between 
1956 and 1957 when the net gain was 121,809 members 
or 1.24 per cent. During the next 12 years the church 
membership is expected to reach the 11-million mark. 

FROWNS ON S UNDAY SPORTS. The Youth Fellowship Council 
of the New England Methodist Conference frowns on 
the Sunday-afternoon sports activities of some Boston 
high schools. Describing such games as harmful to 
religious programs, it suggests interscholastic sports 
be held only on the six other weekdays. 
{More church news on page 65) 




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70 



Together/january 1959 



*i* Personal Testimony By ED BECK 



Lesson 
for the 
Living 




, iugust, 1955: Ed Bec{ and Billic Ray arc married. 



Towering six feet seven inches, Methodist minister- 
to-be Ed Becl{ was a basketball natural. At the 
University of Kentucky he captained the varsity 
and played on the 1958 NCAA championship team. 
Now studying at Candler School of Theology, 
Emory University, he shares this moving testi- 
mony as he told it to Jerald Huntsinger.— Eds. 



JILARLY in 1957 I was a junior at the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, playing center on the Wildcat 
basketball team. Hundreds of miles away, in a 
Macon, Ga., hospital, my wife lay dying of an 
incurable disease. I had wanted to stay at her 
side those months, but she insisted I continue 
my education and my basketball. She wouldn't 
have me sitting around, waiting for her to die. 

One Saturday night, flying to Macon after a 
game, questions churned in my mind. Why did 
Billie have to die? Would I find her better this 
time? Worse? Or would I arrive too late? 

Early the next morning I knelt by her bed. 
"Billie," I asked, "is there anything you want to 
tell me?" She looked me full in the eyes. "Yes, 
Ed," she said softly, "one thing. Always remem- 
ber I'm all of God's and he is all of me." 

Scarcely a month later we buried her pain- 
wasted body. Only God knows why Billie had 
to die so young. But I know this: her attitude 
through months of suffering showed me, and 
countless others, how to live. Faith — that was her 
secret strength. Not the vague kind we so glibly 
talk about, but the kind one lives. 

Billie was a nurse and intended to become a 
doctor. Then, after I had finished college, we 
planned to marry and go to the mission field 
together— me as an evangelist, Billie as a doctor. 
But fate had other plans. Billie was bothered 
by a slight pain in her upper chest. Doctors 
diagnosed the trouble as Hodgkin's disease, for 
which no cure is known. Five years they gave 
her; maybe only three. 

Billie accepted this news calmly. I couldn't. 



How could a loving God permit such a thing 
for one who had dedicated her life to healing 
others? But, praying together, we found strength 
to face the future. I wanted to be married right 
away; Billie was strictly against it. Finally, she 
agreed— on one condition. "Ed," she said, "no 
matter what happens to me, you'll finish your 
education and keep on playing basketball." It 
was a hard bargain, but I gave my word. 

Just three weeks after we married in August, 
1955, Billie became ill again. This time doctors 
offered no hope; death might come any time. 
Now I fiercely rebelled. I demanded in prayers 
that she be spared. But Billie gently rebuked: 
"Ed, don't pray for healing. Just pray that God 
will give me complete understanding." 

Though in almost constant pain for over a 
year, Billie rarely talked about death. Instead, 
she did all she could to cheer others. The head 
doctor at the incurable cancer clinic said her 
attitude changed the outlook of nearly every 
other patient there. And letters from all over 
the U.S. testify that she inspired fresh faith for 
thousands who had lost all hope. 

As the end drew near, Billie's spirit never 
faltered. I stayed at her bedside those last five 
days. The final afternoon she reached for 
my hand, smiled faintly, and whispered, "Ed, 
don't ever forget that I love you." Those were 
her last words. 

A few weeks later, I stopped for lunch in a 
small Kentucky town. My waitress stared, then 
asked, "Are you Ed Beck?" When I said yes, 
tears formed in her eyes. "My husband has 
Hodgkin's disease," she said simply. "All he 
does is sit around and feel sorry for himself. 
How can I help him?" 

We sat down and I told her about Billie's 
complete trust in God. I suggested that she and 
her husband read the Scriptures and pray to- 
gether, as Billie and I had done. And as we 
talked, I realized that Billie's death had not been 
in vain. Her demonstration of faith always 
would live as an inspiration to others. 



/; 



Pining for 'the good old days'? You'll stop if you'll take 

A Sharp Look Ahead 



By W. M. KIPLINGER 

Editor, Changing Times and Kiplinger Washington Letter 



Yc 



.OU'RE YOUNG, let's say somewhere between 20 
and 60 — youthful enough, anyway, to be interested in 
1984. I've been picking brains of specialists who must 
know what's ahead. Let me share with you what I've 
learned about the next 25 years. 

First, for a sampling, let's take a five-year chunk, 1959 
to 1964. If normalcy isn't too old-fashioned, let's use 
that word here. Science will continue as usual to amaze 
us with its discoveries and inventions. Prices will go on 
going up. There won't be a world war. The "cold war" 
will continue to shift from the military to the economic 
front. And that's why we should give special thought 
to 1963, for it will start the greatest spurt of material 
growth this country has ever known. 

A boom ? Yes. We can foresee and date it because young 
folks born 20-odd years ago rushed to get married and 
rushed some more to have babies. America never saw a 
baby boom like the one that started during World War 
II and continues even up to now. 

Out of that baby wave, some 25 years later, will come 
a wave of marriages starting in 1963, sure as shooting. 
That means a building boom, demand for millions of 
new houses. Demand for furniture, furnishings, garden 
hose, and lawn mowers. Add new things produced by 
the new technology. More people, wanting more things, 
and more things crowding the markets — that's the com- 
bination which will make the boom! 

But what new things, you ask, will we have by 1984? 
Well, I hesitate to list them, for I wouldn't be surprised 
if you're like the old country woman who had never seen 
a giraffe. When she did, she said, "I don't believe it!" 
But hold your horses, here we go. Here's what you will 
see: 

Man-controlled weather. 

Electric power produced from atoms — but coal, oil, and 
gas still used as fuels. 

Television screens on the walls of your rooms — and TV 
in color, of course. 

Electrostatic wands for the wife to dust her house. 

Automatic dishwashers that can be wheeled to tableside. 

Telephones that reach almost anywhere in the country 
merely by dialing. 

Air conditioning in almost every new home — some of 
which will be heated, lighted, and cooled by rays from the 
sun, with the apparatus in the roof. 

Windows that close automatically when it rains. 

Bed blankets that cool you. 

Luminous ceilings to light your home. 

Paper throw-away clothing. 

Electronic cooking — in just a few minutes. 



Some foods preserved by radiation — not canned, not 
frozen. 

Shopping by television from your home. 

I remember when I regarded radio as a pipe dream, 
television as science fiction, and the airplane as a tricky 
gadget — fun to see at county fairs. My father was a 
carriage maker, so I knew the automobile would never 
replace the horse. An automobile, an enclosed one at 
that, in every garage? But presto! Miracles have been 
performed before my eyes, and more are to come. Let 
me expand the list: 

Intercity mail delivered by rockets. 

Airplanes and trains powered by atoms. (Remember the 
old steam locomotive and the old diesel?) 

Space travel by people, probably even to the moon. 

Television across the oceans, sure. (That means seeing and 
hearing people in other lands, right in your own home.) 

Fresh water from the sea. (Think what that could mean 
to fertile but arid lands, say in the Sahara.) 

The beginnings of food from the sea — new kinds of food, 
not just fish, for millions of people. 

New metals, new combinations of metals, to do all kinds 
of marvelous jobs— not now possible. 

Rearrangement of molecules to make new plastics, tex- 
tiles, metals, medicines, building materials. 

The common cold finally licked. 

Cancer and heart ailments probably controlled. 

Old people living five years longer than they now do, 
and having the wherewithal to live it out. 

So much for miracles of technology and science. Check 
up with me in 25 years. You'll probably find that I under- 
stated. Now let's tick off some trends in other areas. 

Politics. The two-party system will continue in this 
country. First one party will be in, then the other. The 
so-called center will move further to the left over the long 
pull of decades. The middle of the road will eventually 
be lefter, not righter. 

Labor will not form its own party. It will work through 
one already established. Unions will have their ups and 
downs, but over the long pull they will grow. They will 
be cleaned up. They will become more responsible, in 
the general public interest. 

Federal and state governments will do more collab- 
orating as states develop stronger muscles. Federal 
government will do more financing or underwriting of 
big industries such as railroads. People will refer to this 
as a growth of state capitalism, but it won't be doctrinaire 
or theoretical socialism. It will be earthy, practical, and 
generally accepted — step by step. 



12 



TogetheivOanuary 1959 



!■■■■■ 




There's a wonderful age ahead, 
this expert feels: mail by rocket, wall-to-wall TV, 

electrostatic dust wands, throw-away 
clothing — and much morel 



Taxes. They will rise. You youngsters will pay more 
taxes than your parents did, and you will gripe the same 
way. Federal taxes will go down a little, but not much. 
Defense will be with us a long time. Full peace will 
not be in your lifetime, human nature all over the world 
being what it is. State and local taxes will go up a good 
deal, just because people will demand so much more 
and better service from their state and local governments 
— for schools, hospitals, social services, and utilities. 

Prices. They're going up, too! In 25 years most things 
will cost about 50 per cent more than now. Remember 
this today when you get around to talking about how to 
handle your family money and how to plan your affairs 
while you are young. 

Farms and Cities. The number of farmers will 
continue to decline as a movement to towns and cities 
continues, but we'll have bigger farms and more ma- 
chinery. [See What's Ahead for Farmers? by Charles 
B. Shuman, August, 1958, page 29.] 

The cities will continue to grow outward, the suburbs 
extending much farther than now. (That's a good tip 
if you ever scrape together enough money to buy land 
or real estate.) In due course, a number of people will 
move from the suburbs back to the cities — when their 
children are raised and on their own. 



Downtown, the cities will be done over and rehabili- 
tated. Many slums will be going or gone. In their place 
will be new homes, new apartment buildings, new 
shopping centers, new traffic arteries, and a system of 
parking lots. The rebuilding of our cities internally will 
be one of the major enterprises, and it will pay off — in 
money, health, and human welfare. 

Also, people will move from region to region, as their 
changing work requires. The growingest areas, in terms 
of population, will be Florida, California, and the 
Southwest — because of climate and retirement. 

Education. Schools will be better. That's insured by 
the tremendous burst of agitation and dissatisfaction 
about them these days. We'll have better physical facili- 
ties, more teachers, more teaching. We'll have better 
teachers, too, with higher status — an incentive which 
goes far beyond pay. I can not foresee the time when we 
shall have fully licked the teacher problem, however. 

As for colleges and universities, there's both good 
news and bad news. One thing fairly certain is that all 
the colleges and universities put together cannot grow 
fast enough to take care of all the young people ap- 
proaching college age. There must be more screening 
and selection. Entrance requirements must be higher. 

More postgraduate work for a number of selected stu- 



January 1959\Together 



13 



dents? Yes, of course. The times will require it. And not 
just in science and engineering, either. 

State universities will not grow in numbers as fast 
in the future as they have in the past. But they will have 
more branches. Some will be two-year schools, like high- 
er high schools. In the main university will be a smaller 
proportion of undergraduates, a higher of postgrads. 

Private, independent, or church-related colleges will 
have to have public money, whether they like it or not. 
We can't get along without them, and in the long pull 
many of them just cannot finance themselves. [See 
Methodists Still Start Colleges, October, 1958, page 24.] 

Public money for scholarships, both federal and state, 
will be coming along — some of it within five years. 



Wc 



ORLD AFFAIRS. The great issue will be: (1) 
Communism, and (2) the rise of the backward nations. 

Communism will persist, but Communist peoples will 
discover some merits in the private enterprise system, and 
will graft these features onto Communist ideas and 
methods. The Communist zeal will shift from militaris- 
tic aggression to trade or economic competition, and the 
United States is going to have its hands full devising 
new setups for world trade. 

We, too, will be compelled to borrow or adapt some 
features normally catalogued as socialistic, such as gov- 
ernment capital participating with private capital to do 
big jobs that can't be done by either alone. 

There will be no world war between Russia and the 
West because both sides are too much afraid of starting 
it purposely, and both sides will avoid slips that might 
start it accidentally. Partial disarmament, or limitation 
of the A and H-bombs, is coming within 10 years. But 
don't expect too much too fast. A big Defense Depart- 
ment will be with us through your lifetime. 

As for the backward nations — in Africa, in the Mid- 
dle East, and in Asia — they will rise and progress, and 
we in the United States, after considerable faltering and 
fiddling around, will help them to rise and progress. 

Underprivileged peoples are gaining privileges and 
opportunities pretty fast. It's true of Negroes. This prog- 
ress is certain to continue, but social progress will lag 
behind material progress just as it has in the past, be- 
cause human minds, ideas, concepts, and prejudices of 
all kinds are so much less flexible than materials. 

Things of the Spirit. So far I have been speaking 
mainly of materialistic gains. Some people contrast them 
with spiritual qualities. To me, the two seem inter- 
twined and interrelated, one and the same, two sides of a 
coin. The only trouble is that some people fix their 
eyes on one side of the coin and never turn it over. 

As a people, we have made great material progress for 
which, deep down, we know we are thankful even 
though we do not always stop to think and say so. Yet 
we all have moods of looking back to "the good old days." 
In those good old days we had smallpox, and children 
slaved in factories to get the family enough to eat, and 
people died young from overwork and from maladies 
that were taken for granted. 

I see merit in the modern bathroom and kitchen. It is 
good to have radio and TV. It is fine to have roads and 
motor machines that let us visit our next-door neighbors 



50 miles away. It is thrilling to have efficient spectacles 
and hearing aids, nylons, anesthetics, self-liquidating 
mortgages, hi-fi records with music both good and bad, 
nursery schools, frozen orange juice, eight-hour work- 
days, five-day weeks, insecticides, garbage collection. 

It enriches life to have frozen string beans in the 
winter, cheap plastic toys at Christmastime, enough 
clothes, and enough food to make the kids grow taller 
than their parents. The can opener and the can to open 
seem to me to be boons. 

All these things show material progress, and material 
progress can be good for the spirit. Sometimes it isn't, 
but that's because of a lag in the cultivation of the spirit, 
and not a fault of material progress itself. 

Churches are making notable growth both in member- 
ship and in physical plants. They will grow much more 
in the quarter-century ahead. Partly it's because of the 
country's material prosperity, and partly because the big 
crop of young parents, scheduled for the '60s and there- 
after, will want religious education for their children. 
(Already you can see this in the suburbs and in subur- 
ban churches.) But mainly it is because our people are 
religious, deep down. 

Like many Americans, I believe in a spirit, a system, a 
law, an intelligence that permeates everyone and every- 
thing, a great design beyond the limits of comprehension. 
The simple word is God. I believe in God. 

This is a force that unifies the universe. It accounts 
for the veins in a blade of grass, the hiving of bees, the 
slant of the sunlight this afternoon, the chin of the 
grandpa, and the chin of the grandchild. These things 
are miracles, but they are merely details in the law of 
God. To whatever extent I can bring myself to be in 
tune with this universal law, to that extent I am good. 



M 



OST Americans, I believe, are moved by religious 
impulses not only in personal but in domestic and for- 
eign affairs. Sometimes this is concealed because we don't 
talk and brag about our religion. We tend to keep it 
under cover — but it's there, nevertheless. We are, in fact, 
a more religious people than we dare to admit. 

Each of us at times feels beaten down by frustrations, 
overwhelmed by things that seem wrong with the world. 
The Russians are awful. The atom bomb may blow 
us up. Taxes are a burden. Public service is full of 
corruption. Gambling and rackets are widespread. 
There's venality in college sports. Youths are drafted — 
for what? Schools are too crowded. There are traffic 
jams and floods and airplane crashes. Europe does not 
appreciate our aid. People are dying of cancer and heart 
disease. Children still are crippled by polio. Morals are 
not what they used to be. The world is going to pot — so 
we say to ourselves in these moods. 

But take off the blinders. See the world as a whole and 
life as a flowing stream. Each generation has more ad- 
vantages and privileges than the generation behind it. 
These advantages do not always bring character and a 
sense of responsibility, but they do not necessarily under- 
mine them, either. I have faith that the young genera- 
tion 25 years hence will be an improvement over its 
predecessor — notwithstanding the murmurings of 
anxious parents. 



14 



TogetheiyJanuary 1959 




Paul-Henri Spaa\, Secretary General, North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 



Without a shot being fired in anger— 



Europe Is Pulling Together 



By PAUL-HENRI SPAAK 

Burly and dynamic, they have Cfdled him, hut there 
is nothing of the bull-in-the-china-shop attitude about 
this soft-spoken and courteous Belgian who, since 
May, 1957, has headed NATO. Now on the verge of 
60, Paul-Henri Spaak has focused his crowded career 
on a single purpose — bringing together the clashing 
countries of Europe. Once, at 39, Belgium's youngest 
prime minister, he has had high international re- 
sponsibilities and has often been decorated. — Eds. 



M. 



.ARK January 1, 1959, as mo- 
mentous for Europe and the entire 
peace-loving world. That day begins 
the first of three four-year stages that 
will level tariff barriers among six 
European countries. Almost 130 mil- 
lion people live in this area. 

No longer will Belgian lace pause 
at the French border to pay duty, 
nor West German tools halt at the 
Dutch custom house. Among France, 
West Germany, Italy, Belgium, the 
Netherlands and Luxembourg there 
will be no restrictions on imports or 



75 



IRELAND 






exports. There will be a Common 
Market — and we have good reason 
for spelling it in capitals. 

Look ahead a dozen years to the 
end of the transitional period that is 
now beginning! Goods, capital, labor, 
and services will move freely across 
frontiers in the European commu- 
nity. Frontiers once closed in war 
will be neighborly borders. 

The effort to bring Europeans to- 
gether into a peaceful community is 
not new. It reached some strength 
after the First World War, but later 
events estranged our countries in- 
stead of bringing them together. We 
moved slowly toward the second con- 
flict on a world scale. That over, we 
drifted until the Communist thrust 
at Prague in 1948 made us realize 
that we might be entirely submerged 
by Soviet imperialism. 

Then came into being the Brussels 
Treaty in 1948, signed by the United 
Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, 
Belgium, and Luxembourg. The 
following year it was reinforced by 
the Washington Treaty which 
brought together these nations with 
other European countries in view of 
the organization of their collective 
defense with the assistance of the 
United States and Canada. 

It was not until May of 1950 that 
the European Coal and Steel Com- 
munity was born, drawing together 



France, Germany, Italy, and the 
three Benelux countries (Belgium, 
the Netherlands, and Luxembourg) 
in an effort to pool resources of coal, 
steel, iron ore, and scrap. It also was 
known as the "Schuman Plan." 

A voluntary military association 
through the medium of a "European 
army," the European Defense Com- 
munity, was tried, but it failed to 
overcome political obstacles. Then, in 
1955, at Messina, Sicily, the six coun- 
tries that had banded together to 
free restrictions on trading in coal 
and steel proclaimed the startling 
proposal for the Common Market. 

The treaties were ratified at Rome 
on March 25, 1957. That was a great 
day for Europe. The Pan-European 
movement had risen from the ashes. 
This Common Market treaty offers 
a chance for economic co-operation 
and growth. No longer may econo- 
mists speak of "little Europe" or 
"sick Europe." 

Europe is not sick now! Belgium, 
my country, with only 9 million, is 
not little in the sense of trading 
potentiality when viewed as of 1969 
or 1972, when the integration of the 
community is fulfilled. The United 
States has only 20 million more con- 
sumers in the home market than has 
our community. 

Nor is Europe longer to be re- 
garded as incurably sick. True 




NORWAT 



SWEDEN 




BRITAIN 




WEST GERMANY 



BELGIUM 

LUXEMBOURG 



TRANCE 



SWITZERLAND 
ITALY 



AUSTRIA 




The New Europe 



Common Market 

These six nations now 
are uniting to pro- 
mote economic co-operation 
and to level tariff barriers on 
mutual imports and exports. 



-- Euratom 

vu The same nations last 
year began helping 
each other develop atomic 
installations and obtain nu- 
clear fuels for peaceful uses. 



Free-Trade Area 
Eventually, it is 
hoped, all these na- 
tions will be bound together 
in a common market, or in 
closer economic co-operation. 



TURKEY 



GREECE 



enough, Europe has been sick. For 
years, this continent was on the path 
of decline, leading toward decadence. 
The world no longer looked for its 
decisions, its guidance, to the great 
cities of the Atlantic and the Medi- 
terranean which symbolized our 
civilization for 25 centuries — to 
Athens, Rome, Paris, London, 
Madrid, Vienna. In comparison with 
the United States and its record of 
swift economic progress over 75 
years, ours were underdeveloped 
countries. 

This Common Market agreement 
is based on the idea that Europe can 
be, must be saved. The malady is 
grave, with complications economic 
and political and also moral — that is, 
spiritual. I am most anxious about 
the spiritual health. 

That brings me to EURATOM— 
the European Atomic Energy Com- 
munity. In existence since January 1, 
1958, this organization binds the 
same six nations into an agreement 
about nuclear power. It would build 
up the technical know-how, promote 
investment and the development of 
atomic installations, and provide a 
sufficient supply of nuclear fuels in 
the field of peaceful uses of nuclear 
energy. 

All this is closely related, as I see it, 
to the future of Christian civilization, 
with its special concept of man, 
founded on respect for human per- 
sonality. 

The other qualities of our living 
have come from that basic concept. 
We Europeans must and do admit 
that we have not reached perfec- 
tion in applying the moral principles 
of our civilization, that the day of 
complete democracy and liberty and 
social justice has not yet arrived 
among us; but now all we have 
achieved in maintaining respect for 
human personality is menaced. 

I will immediately identify that 
menace: it is Communism. I am 
convinced that we are living in one 
of those epochs of history when two 
civilizations confront each other in 
a contest for survival. And I am 
anti-Communist, not because Com- 
munists are for the nationalization 
of industry, or because they are 
against capitalism; nor because of 
differences on economic and social 
questions. I am anti-Communist be- 
cause I know that Communism is 
not merely one political party more 



Together/january 1959 



I 



to the left than other parties, as so 
many people still believe. Instead, 
Communism is an experiment in 
forming a civilization, in creating a 
way of life and manner of thought, 
a system of human relationships, 
drastically opposed to our civiliza- 
tion. Communism denies and spurns 
the individual man. 

As I see it, the fight against Com- 
munism is, in great part, an eco- 
nomic campaign. Because the future 
belongs to great communities, Eu- 
rope must organize its life so that it 
becomes a great community for pro- 
duction and trade. That can be done 
without loss of individuality for the 
various peoples. And I firmly be- 
lieve that, if we succeed in uniting 
Europe economically, we shall surely 
arrive at political unity. 

As soon as economic collaboration 
makes its effects felt in everyday com- 
merce, you will see the beginnings 
of an intellectual awakening in 
Europe. The peoples will see their 
own unrealized capabilities; they 
will be roused in imagination, dis- 
covery, and invention. They will find 
ever-new means to produce, trade, 
and use goods; and they will develop 
new intellectual interests. 

The creation of the Common Mar- 
ket and the Atomic Energy Com- 
munity is probably among the fore- 
most of European achievements. I 
believe it ranks with the French 
Revolution. 

It is in keeping with the spirit of 
the times. When Britain's Prime 
Minister Macmillan met with Presi- 
dent Eisenhower last year, their com- 
munique contained this sentence: 

"The future, the fate of our coun- 
tries, no longer lies in independence; 
it is only in interdependence, in the 
common use of our resources and in 
the sharing of our tasks, that we 
shall find our economic progress and 
our security." 

It is so with us in Europe. Most 
of the grand projects of history have 
come to fruition only through the 
use of force, threat, or violence. But 
our only arms in this day's trium- 
phal march have been our insistent 
appeal to wisdom and intelligence, 
our call for human solidarity. 

Without force or violence, we have 
brought about a revolution so neces- 
sary and so profound that it perhaps 
will make all other revolutions un- 
necessary. 



January 195B\Together 



Little Lessons in Spiritual Efficiency 

Let's Live 
Enthusiastically 




By ROY L. SMITH 



THE ANCIENT Greeks spoke of 
enthusiasm as "the divine fire of the 
soul." It is the quality of mind and 
heart which contributes more to the 
spirit of triumphant living than any 
other grace or gift. 

To be able to throw all of one's 
soul into a game is one of the first 
identifications of a champion. To be 
able to sing or play with abandon is 
one of the first marks of an artist. 
To be able to live to the limit is to 
achieve life at its best. 

"He has never found much fun in 
life because he has never been able to 
escape from his caution," said a 
woman of her husband. "He has 
missed at least half a dozen chances 
to make a modest fortune because he 
was unwilling to take risks. He has 
never been able to achieve any real 
success because he has always lived 
in terror of failure. He has never 
been really good or really bad, be- 
cause he could not let himself go." 

Yes, there is something glorious 
in the heroism of one who can throw 
all of his skill, power, and dedication 
in on the side of some splendid cause. 

There are people in every con- 
gregation who are never quite able 
to surrender themselves to the mood 
of worship. They sing hymns list- 
lessly. They mumble the words of 
the responsive reading. If they listen 
to the sermon, they guard their emo- 



tions lest they be swept away by the 
preacher's passion. And when the 
collection is taken they have their 
generous impulses under perfect con- 
trol. 

There was something sublime in 
the way those American lads on Iwo 
Jima raised the shot-down colors 
again amid a hail of shot and shell. 
They were truly living to the limit. 
It was this quality of life that Jesus 
was insisting upon when he said that 
his disciples, to follow him, must 
turn their backs on home, parents, 
fortune, and fame. 

It is the man who can listen in- 
tently who gets most of the sermon. 
It is he who is able to forget caution 
and give with abandon who finds 
his stewardship a rewarding ex- 
perience. One of the explanations of 
a mother's love is the fact that every 
mother goes down into the valley of 
the shadow of death that a new life 
may begin. It is the Christian who 
has gone to a Crucifixion who rises 
in a Resurrection. 

To drag one's feet is to sap one's 
spirit; to move cautiously is to 
come to a standstill; to speak always 
with constraint is to be drowned out 
by the crowd; to be just a little reli- 
gious is to be almost irreligious. 

And now abideth faith, hope, and 
charity; these three, but all of them 
with enthusiasm! 



17 







Introducing 
a new series of 
visits to homes of: 



PEOPLE 
CAllED 
METHODISTS 



Mee 



Everybody in 
Athens, 8,618 of 
them, kjiows the twins. 
Here they chat with 
the editor of the 
Post-Athenian. 



Together/January 1959 




The Quails pose before their white frame home: Herman and France, and their daughters, Linda, Judith, jane, and Frances. 



lie Quails of Athens, Tenn. 



A 



WAY BACK in 1781 over in England, John Wesley 
wrote A Short History of the People Called Methodists. 
With its emphasis upon people — rather than, say, theology 
or liturgy — the title reveals one of the open secrets of 
why Methodism is the largest Protestant church in the 
USA (9.6 million members). So pictorial visits to typical 
Methodist homes are appropriate for Together, The 
Midmonth Magazine for Methodist Families. The series 
will range from coast to coast — every other month. 

It starts this month with the Quails in Tennessee, 
not far from the populational center of American Meth- 
odism. They're pictured above — Herman, tanned and 
rugged from outdoor work as a construction superin- 
tendent, and his wife Frankie (her mother wanted a boy, 
hence the name), a public-health nurse. Obviously Linda 
and Judith, 18, are twins; then come Jane, 13, and 
Frances, 9. 

Sundays find all six Quails attending Keith Memorial 
Methodist Church in Athens. Each is active in some 
work, father as a steward and member of the Board of 
Evangelism, mother in the Adult Fellowship. The four 



January 1959\Toeether 



daughters find time to work with MYF and church 
school as members or teachers. 

Herman and Frankie are, in the words of the twins, 
"the most wonderful parents any person could have; they 
inspire us to do things worthwhile." And so they have! 

Few twins can match Linda Faye and Judith Kayc 
for beauty, scholarship, leadership, and service. These 
blue-eyed Southern belles are identical twins with almost 
identical accomplishments — but with dissimilar goals. 
First-born Linda is at Rollins College, Winter Park, 



Herman is 
in charge of 

building a new 
paper plant. 




Meet the Quails— continued 

Mother and Dad both work— 
and the girls keep busy too. 





As a public-health nurse, Mrs. Quails visits all l{inds of 
patients. Here she calls on Earl Franks, 16, a friend, who 
was paralyzed in an auto accident. Occasionally she drives 
150 miles a day. Mrs. Quails trained at St. Thomas Hospital 
in Nashville, where twins, Linda and Judith, were later born. 




"According to our blueprints . . ." Herman goes 
over details with his foremen. Now a construc- 
tion superintendent, he was once a carpenter on 
atomic installations at the Oa\ Ridge "A" plant. 



Wm\ 





"Handy man in jeans" that's fane. E^fl 






A ready, willing, and able helper, both ' ""' A 


■V » tee ^^k^vr - ^h \^W9'^^^ 




^indoors and out, she mixes cement for a new . , 






addition to their modest cottage H -. 
while Dad wields the shovel. 








, 20 




i r - " v ' * • ^ y 




An eager young schoolmate, his eyes a-tivinkje , shares a secret with Frances. 



Fla., on a $4,400 Achievement Scholarship, studying to 
be a diplomat. Judith, at Tennessee Wesleyan, also on 
a scholarship, hopes to be an obstetrician. 

In 1957, Linda was head of Tennessee's Future Home- 
makers of America (FHA), and Judith was president 
of Girls' Nation. One of their big thrills that year was 
meeting President Eisenhower in Washington. Currently, 
they are serving with TV personality Dick Clark as 
co-chairmen of the 1959 March of Dimes Teen Age 
Program for The National Foundation. 

While in McMinn County High School, Linda and 
Judith were members of the National Honor Society, 
National Thespian Society, the band, and FHA. They 
worked tirelessly for the Teens Against Polio drive, were 
lifeguards at the Athens pool, camp counselors, and 
champion tennis players. 

But they are individuals, too. Judith wrote for the 
school paper, Pow-wow, was head cheerleader, and 
favors a youth who plays football at Tennessee. Linda 
held several class offices, was head majorette — and likes 
a baseball star at Rollins. Linda plays the flute and 
piccolo, her sister the saxophone and trumpet. They 
always dress alike, but wear different hairdos. Neither 



January 1969\Together 



TW. Aloo. C*~~r.i 
-J " 

UBMp 

^1 Hi 

B391B it iTM 

•• " ■ ! -*» 

C Cu C Zn 

.1 •• *1-'--- 

RlTQSr " 

ft. ■■■! 



Beauty and brains can go together! 



111 V 




•.tmr^j.F - ir;. 




T/jf twins take time for some tennis. 



Meet the Quails— continued 

Here's a story all families know, soon or late. 

twin believes in "going steady" — at least not as yet. 

Jane, now in the eighth grade, and cute Frances, a 
fourth grader, show signs of following in their big 
sisters' footsteps in both looks and activities. Jane, presi- 
dent of her Intermediate MYF, is a champion tennis 
player and a dedicated Girl Scout. Frances has just started 
her career as a Brownie. 

The Quails are a close-knit, but out-giving family — 
typical of the People Called Methodists. 




A sober moment. This unposed photo of the Quails family was snapped by Together's 
photographer the night before Linda was to leave for college. 



Farewells said, Linda — first to leave the family nest — starts toward her plane. 




"Good-by now, Frances. Be good!' 



22 




A Together in the 



feature 



Hospital Sojourn— Jr. Style 



By CECILIA L SCHULZ 



J_ O SAY "good-by" is to die a little, say the French, 
aptly. But one leave-taking which entails dying much 
more than "just a little" occurs when heavyhearted 
parents turn over to impersonal strangers a newly hos- 
pitalized child. 

To turn one's back on an ailing chick at the very 
moment when one most longs to offer the comfort and 
support of parental arms is to die not a little, but a 
little at a time! 

For the sick youngster, admission to a hospital usually 
includes a series of unpleasant features — departure from 
home, separation from parents, discomfort or pain, 
fright at being precipitated into an alien atmosphere, 
apprehension as to what may happen next! No use 
pretending, hospital sojourns are not fun for the kiddies. 
Not at the beginning, at any rate! 

However, there are ways by which thoughtful parents 
can ease the acute emotional distress of a hospital-bound 
child and make this separation more bearable for all. 

Probably the greatest help is an example of calmness. 
The seasoned pediatric nurse will tell you that the 
sprigs she admits to her domain — excepting the youngest 
children — almost always take their behavior cue from 
accompanying adults. A poised, confident mother im- 
parts her composure to the youngster; an eye-dabbing 
parent, as a rule, has a terrified, struggling child to 
turn over to the nurse. 

Having been pediatrically inclined for years, I feel 
that I may call myself an expert at junior-version hos- 
pital admissions. My professional services are dispensed 
between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Nocturnal hospital admis- 
sions are never casual. Emergency, or at least great 
urgency, is the order of the night. Yet, even among 
these, the pajama-clad, blanket-wrapped tyke accepts 
me as a helpful friend when the parent indicates that 
such, indeed, I am. 

The process of shockproofing a child's hospital ini- 
tiation may begin long before the actual admittance. 
How does the youngster feel, for one thing, about doc- 



The average doctor has a way with little 

people, charming them into a co-operative and 

friendly mood. Everything else being equal, children 

can learn to love the family physician. 



January 19$9\Together 








4 



tors and nurses? If he grows up with assurance that 
the man in white and his helper, the lady in white, 
are friends rather than enemies, entrance into a place 
bristling with such people will be a far less trying ex- 
perience. 

Office visits to the family doctor for routine check- 
ups and preventive shots often serve as an introduction 
to the medical faculty. These visits can have a pleas- 
ant flavor, if planned with a pinch of foresight and a 
dash of common sense. The smart mother, knowing that 
even the most amiable child may become excited or 
irritable when overtired, adjusts her offspring's routine 
to include a late-morning bath and nap on the day that 
a waiting-room session cancels the usual afternoon 'rest 
period. 

Her schedule, carefully thought out in advance, per- 
mits a leisurely lunch and unhurried take-off for the 
doctor's office, thereby eliminating any confusion in 
connection with the occasion. While dressing the tod- 
dler — best bib and tucker, of course — for office visits, 
the wise mother assumes a pleasant air rather than a 
lamb-to-the-slaughter attitude. Under her guidance, the 
waiting room interlude becomes a relaxed period of 
picture-book perusal, new toy investigation, or delight- 
ful encounter with other small-sized heel-coolers. 

When, finally, the sanctum sanctorum is reached, she 
chats cheerfully with the doctor, avoiding a long face 
or agitated tone of voice even if she has a serious prob- 
lem to discuss. Her air of confidence and trust assures 
her child that the physician and nurse are in the 
"people who are good to know" category. 

The outrage of needle-sticking and indignity of mo- 
mentary nudity notwithstanding, early visits to the 
doctor's office can be managed in such a way that they 
are remembered by young sprouts as a necessary part of 
growing up and not as grim visits to a torture chamber. 
The average doctor has a way with little people, charm- 
ing them into a co-operative and friendly mood. Every- 
thing else being equal, children can learn to love the 
family physician and to respect his judgments. Such 
sentiments come in mighty handy when and if a child 
requires hospitalization! 



When I was sick and lay a-bed, 
I had two pillows at my head, 

And all my toys beside me lay 

To keep me happy all the day. 

— Robert Louis Stevenson 



An example of calmness at the time of admission and 
early establishment of a happy relationship between 
youngster and doctor aid in reconciling the child to 
hospitalization. 

Morale bolsters of a physical nature may be in order 
when preparations are being made to leave for the 
hospital. Countless times a pediatric nurse has blessed a 
mother for packing her child's favorite blanket or pil- 
low, or a beloved doll or cuddly toy animal. These 



familiar items provide immeasurable comfort to a home- 
sick child, especially at night. 

An absorbing toy, such as a kaleidoscope, a "magic" 
slate, a puzzle, a new book or doll, a new outfit for a 
favorite doll, a crayon coloring book — any of these may 
offer distraction for a small surgical patient during the 
preoperative period and the postoperative days. "Special 
for the occasion" bedroom slippers, pajamas, dressing 
gowns, hair ribbons, and barrettes often works wonders 
as tear dispellers, once the wheel chair or ambulatory 
stage of recuperation has been achieved. Taboo, for ob- 
vious reasons, are bubble pipes and solutions, water 
pistols, games having minute parts, breakable plastic 
toys, musical instruments, and noisemakers. Such things 
annoy others, and add to the nurse's work. 



T 



HE baby accustomed to a pacifier should not be de- 
prived of this solace when hospitalized. Mothers, fear- 
ful that doctors and nurses will look down their noses 
at such a device, sometimes leave this prop at home. 
Bad habit or not, a period of hospitalization is not a 
propitious time for such "cold turkey" treatment of a 
small one. 

Of great assistance to the nurses is a written list of 
the little one's normal habits and possible idiosyncrasies. 
An intelligent mother will jot down any food or drug 
allergies her child may have. Such data may be of vital 
importance. Other titbits of information can save the 
patient hours of plaintive unhappiness or indignant 
howling, especially if he or she has not yet reached the 
age of free speech. By being tipped off in advance that 
a baby has been a belly sleeper since birth, that a young 
stalwart is an habitual climber who may need a net over 
his crib, that a small newcomer is teething or familiar 
only with his nickname, the nurse who will serve as 
temporary mother to the child is better equipped to fill 
that role satisfactorily. 

Other pertinent facts, to be put in writing, concern 
an infant's feeding schedule, including formula and 
amount usually consumed, and, in the event that the 
little one has been vomiting or has rejected feedings, 
the hour at which nourishment was retained. 

Whether or not a yearling has graduated from bottle 
to cup, and has been promoted from diapers to training 
panties, the particular terms used at home for bathroom 
service — these facts of life, if made known at the time of 
admission, can assist the young patient to an early ad- 
justment and save time and effort for the nursing staff. 
Too, the careful mother lists information regarding her 
child's most recent defecation and any treatment or 
medication she may have administered at home. 

Hospital conditioned though we Americans are, even 
the most stoic adult knows a pang of dread or at least 
a feeling of nostalgia in leaving behind all that is per- 
sonal, warm, and familiar, and entering an institution 
of healing. 

For a child who cannot comprehend the why and 
wherefore of complete upheaval in his well-ordered 
routine, the transition comprises an experience far from 
pleasant. The key to making this period of stress easier 
lies in the hands of wise, loving — and thoughtful — 
parents. 



24 



mm 



TogetheivOanuary 1959 



The Methodist University & College 

All- American Elevens 





John Spidcl, a Michigan bac\, hurls a pass . 



. . and Northwestern s Dic/^ Thornton intercepts. 





Then raging Wildcat blockers clear the way 



. . as Thornton scats goal ward in a stunning upset. 



By FRED RUSSELL 



Sports Editor, The Nashville Banner 



T> 



HIS WAS the season in which football coaches de- 
vised some of the most ingenious gridiron maneuvers in 
the long history of the game. 

They had to originate revolutionary schemes, be- 
wildering plays, fantastic formations. The defense was 
catching up too fast with the offense. To keep scoring, 
something new had to be added. 

So this was the year of Army's lonesome end and 
Washington's lonesome halfback; the V formation of 
Dartmouth: at Oklahoma, Bud Wilkinson's smorgas- 
bord offense, making extensive use of flankers, men in 
motion, and wide line splits, and Florida State's unique 
"I" formation with all four backs lining up in single 
file behind an unbalanced line. 

There was the extra-point scoring change. The two 
points given to the team which was successful in run- 
ning or passing for the touchdown conversion added an 



element of additional suspense. For any team to get 
through its schedule without at least one upset seemed 
a miracle. 

Out of such an environment and into spotlighted roles 
in this era of innovation and deception, the members of 
Together's third annual All-American, All-Methodist 
football teams step front and center. They possess, as 
well, the old stand-bys: speed, skill, spirit, size, and 
determination. 

To qualify, players were not required to belong to 
The Methodist Church, but only to attend a Methodist 
related school. In these institutions, as in colleges across 
the land, sensations and standout players abounded. 

Take Southern Methodist's Don Meredith as a case 
in point. His passing reminded Texans of Sammy Baugh 
and Davey O'Brien. In fact, he may be the finest forward 
passer collegiate football has ever known. He was spec- 



January 1959\Together 



25 




END, jun Kenney 

Boston 




TACKLE, Andy Cverckp 
Northwestern 



GUARD, Al Bcnccicli 
Syracuse 



CENTER, Don Miller HALFBACK, Wray Q 
Denver Duke 



University 

Don Meredith, SMU's passing quarterback 




tacular in the Mustangs' early games against powerful 
Ohio State and Notre Dame before an injury benched 
him for several weeks. 

Against Ohio State, Meredith completed 19 of 28 
attempts for 213 yards, a feat that had Lew Byrer of 
The Columbus (Ohio) Citizen writing that he is "as 
great a forward passer as this observer has watched in 
40 years of college football." 

Another exciting figure was College of the Pacific's 
fleet-footed Dick Bass. In his team's victory over Cali- 
fornia, he gained 215 yards. On the next weekend, he 
carried the ball 212 yards against Arizona State. No 
back anywhere could come close to matching that con- 
secutive-game performance. 

The early session Cinderella team was Northwestern, 



Second University Eleven 



POSITION 


PLAYER 


SCHOOL 


E 


Henry Christopher 


SMU 


T 


Gene Gossage 


Northwestern 


G 


Mike McGee 


Duke 


C 


William Rewis 


Chattanooga 


G 


Joe Abbatiello 


Northwestern 


T 


Sal Cesario 


Denver 


E 


Dave Sherer 


SMU 


Q 


Chuck Zimmerman 


Syracuse 


H 


George Dutrow 


Duke 


H 


Tom Stephens 


Syracuse 


F 


Glynn Gregory 


SMU 



END, Tom Taylor 
Albion 



TACKLE, Todd Hampton 
Kansas Wesleyan 



CENTER, Dick Dunn HALFBACK, Gary Hofmann FULLBACK, George I 
Allegheny Nebraska Wesleyan Cornell College 




26 



Together/January 1959 






iLBACK, Dick. Bass HALFBACK, Ron Burton GUARD, Tom Koenig 
lege of the Pacific Northwestern Southern Methodist 



loser of nine straight in 1957 but winner of its first four 
in 1958. On October 18, the Wildcats staggered Michigan 
with the most stunning score of the year, 55 to 24. Two 
Northwestern heroes in that game, and in others, too, 
were halfback Ron Burton and quarterback Dick 
Thornton. 

I'm confident this team would hold its own with any 
similar group of stars from schools of any other re- 
ligious denomination. 

Those who are chosen to the Ail-American Methodist 
team from the small colleges are to be similarly esteemed. 
Make no mistake about this: When you sift the nuggets 
in this category, you turn up with players every bit the 
equal of their big-time brethren. If you doubt it, study 
the professional team rosters or ask a pro coach. 



TACKLE, Ron Luciano 
Syracuse 



END, Jim Tucker 

Chattanooga 



Second College Eleven 



POSITION 


PLAYER 


SCHOOL 


E 


Lyle Haberbosch 


Baker 


T 


Bruce Olderman 


Allegheny 


G 


Ardean Williams 


Iowa Wesleyan 


C 


Larry Richards 


Simpson 


G 


Fred Burgee 


Western Maryland 


T 


Manuel Stoupis 


Emory and Henry 


E 


Bob Barrett 


Baldwin-Wallace 


Q 


Chuck Brady 


Baldwin-Wallace 


H 


Billy Garnett 


Randolph-Macon 


H 


Doug Andreason 


Westminster 


F 


Jim Hurd 


Albion 




Charles Davis, McMurry's powerful guard. 



College 



.FBACK, Bill White QUARTERBACK, D. Schmidt GUARD, Bill Pizzica TACKLE, D wight Tollman END, Larry Kir\es 



Bak 



Ohio Wesleyan 



Mount Union 



DePauw 




Westminster 





January 1959\Together 



27 




What of the 



He is administrative assistant to his 

brother, Walter, who is president 

of the United Automobile Workers (UAW). 



They're Really Anti-Union- Shop Laws 

Says VICTOR G. REUTHER 



V^OMPETENT opinion surveys made in states where 
the so-called "Right to Work" law is an issue show many 
people think this law guarantees work. This is not true; 
the law does not assure anyone a job. What the law does 
is to prevent workers and employers from entering into 
union-shop agreements. It guarantees no right to workers, 
but rather abridges the right of American workers to 
enjoy free collective bargaining with employers. 

So far as the real right to work is concerned, the U.S. 
Supreme Court in Railway Employees Department vs. 
Hanson, 351 US 225 (1956), had what should be a final 
word to say on that score. The union shop, it said, is a 
method for achieving the right to work. Organized 



Man Must Have Right of Free Choice 

Believes CLEMENT D. JOHNSTON 



JjASIC TO our American way of life is the idea that 
man has "certain unalienable Rights" — to use a phrase 
from the Declaration of Independence — and that govern- 
ment is an instrument to make such rights effective. 

The question at issue is simple. Should coercive 
power be given to nongovernmental organizations, the 
unions, to compel a man to join a union against his 
will? Should a man be denied the right of earning his 
livelihood in work of his own choosing? 

My answer is "no." Just as a man's right to join a 
union is guaranteed by law, so his right not to join 
should be equally protected. "Right to Work" laws have 
come into being to achieve this. 

Nineteen states have adopted them.* The statutes vary 
slightly, but all seek to protect citizens against insertion 
of union-shop provisions in collective-bargaining contracts 
which compel an employer to dismiss an employee who 
does not belong to the union involved. 

In essence, these laws merely affirm the principle that 
a man has the right to join any union of his choice and 
that he has an equal right not to join. 

In the light of today's conditions, the reasons advanced 



* Ala., Ariz., Ark., Fla.. Ga., lnd., Iowa, Kan., Miss., Neb., Nev., N.C., 
N.D., S.C., S.D., Term., Tex., Utah, and Va. 



as to why everyone should be required to join a union 
as a condition to continuing to hold his job are obscure 
and unconvincing. 

The reasons why an employee might not want to 
join are clear. He may resent compulsion; he may not 
want to support a union which harbors criminals and 
leftists, as some do. He may not believe in the union's 
political aims, nor want to support them. He may not 
want to pay tribute for the privilege of working; or he 
may want to sell his services as he chooses. 

The great mass of American trade-union members is 
completely loyal to America. But some unions harbor 
gangsters, shakedown artists, Communists, and assorted 
leftists who would use unionism as a vehicle to change 
our American democracy into socialism or some other 
ism. To require workingmen and women to join and 
give financial support to such unions is indefensible. 

Hearings before the Senate Rackets Committee have 
demonstrated how our present federal labor laws force 
racketeering unions on employers and make individual 
workers powerless. The worker must join, or support, 
the racketeer union leader or lose his job. The employer 
must sign up or go out of business. 

"Right to Work" laws are part of the effort to deal 



25 



Together/January 1959 



'Right to Work' Laws? 




MIDMONTH 
POWWOW 



Five states rejected them in November but Kansas voted 
'yes' — the nineteenth to do so. Here two Methodist laytnen 
discuss the issues underlying this nationwide controversy. 



employers working for the "Right to Work" law are in 
direct opposition to this judgment. 

The labor movement, it should be made plain, truly 
believes everyone should have the right to employment. 
This belief consistently has been implicit in union pro- 
grams for full employment and economic growth. And 
it has been underscored time and time again in our 
continuing battle to eliminate employer discrimination 
against workers because of race, sex, religion, age, na- 
tional origin, and personal beliefs. 

But we oppose the "Right to Work" laws. Actually, 
they are simply anti-union-shop laws. The deceptive 
labeling of the laws gives them an appeal which their 
proper name would not have. The very fact that Ameri- 
can workers have, through free collective bargaining, 
negotiated tens of thousands of contracts which include 
union-shop clauses is a huge and uncontested proof that 



the voluntary democratic choice of working men and 
women is for a union shop and not against it. 

Further documentation of this fact can be found in 
the record of union-shop elections required by the Labor 
Management Relations Act between 1947 and 1951. A 
now-discarded section of the Act required a majority 
secret-ballot vote of the workers in a factory or mill or 
other work place before an employer and union could 
legally negotiate a union-shop agreement. Of the 46,119 
elections held under this feature of the law in this period, 
an astonishing proportion, 97 per cent, voted in favor of 
the union shop. Altogether, 91 per cent of 5,547,478 valid 
ballots were cast for the union shop. 

These secret-ballot elections conducted by the U.S. 
government proved conclusively that union-shop agree- 
ments will never be eliminated by the traditional demo- 
cratic process of free {continued on page 30, column 2) 



U.S. Chamber of Commerce president in 1954, 

he runs his 450-acre beef cattle farm 

in Virginia and ta\es an active role in public affairs. 




with this situation. These laws in no way impair the 
cause of good unionism, devoted to the interest of the 
individual members and to the general welfare. To the 
contrary, there is almost overwhelming evidence to sup- 
port the belief that the free worker, acting voluntarily 
in what he deems to be his own best interest, is a far 
better union man than the captive worker. His union 
likewise enjoys higher public esteem and is a more effec- 
tive instrument in his behalf. 

The cleanups in union affairs in these states have 
amply demonstrated why these laws are opposed by those 
corrupt labor bosses who rule by fear and who continue 
in office by rigging seldom-held elections. 

One of the most distressing situations I encountered 
during my term as president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the United States was when I received an 
appeal from more than 20 railroad employees in Toledo, 
Ohio. There had been a dispute in their local union. I 
never learned the merits of the issue, which apparently 
concerned union policy. This group lost and was expelled 
from the union. Under existing federal law, the railroad 
was compelled to discharge them. 

Because they had dared to act upon their convictions, 
and because federal laws contain no "Right to Work" 
provision, these men are forever barred from working 
for a railroad anywhere in this country. Though I tried, 
I could do nothing. The President of the United States 
has no power to reinstate them. We found that unless 



29 



the union leaders could be persuaded to reverse their 
reaction, or unless Congress enacted a "Right to Work" 
provision applicable to railway labor, these men would 
find it necessary to learn a new trade and to find a new 
job. That was four years ago and neither group has 
acted. The men are still out of their jobs. What a terrible 
penalty for a minor offense! 

The Chamber of Commerce of the United States, in 
its informative pamphlet, The Case for Voluntary 
Unionism, says that "If an individual worker can no 
longer earn a living except by pledging his support to a 
union, he becomes a subject of a private group. This is, 
to put it bluntly, government without the consent of 
the governed. . . . Compulsory membership, especially 
when tied to an individual's livelihood . . . gives great 
power to the few instead of resting it in the many." 

And we must not forget that there are a great many 
unions which play rough — where sometimes even the 
mildest protest by members brings beatings, or bombings, 
or other forms of violence. Small wonder that the watch- 
word of so many of the more prudent union members 
today is: "Keep your mouth shut." 

There are already many areas and many lines of busi- 
ness where the right to work at a particular job is a 
privilege conferred by the barons of labor upon those 
they choose to favor. 

What are the real reasons why the high command of 
organized labor opposes "Right to Work" laws? 

One big reason is money. Unionism is a big business; 
it requires much money to operate. Just what proportion 
of the more than $2 million daily income of the big 
international unions comes from unwilling contributors 
would be difficult to determine. 

Even more important is power. Labor bosses oppose 
"Right to Work" laws as a restraint upon the absolute 
power which many seek to exercise. Until recently, union 
leadership was concerned primarily with wages, hours, 
and working conditions. The public and the rank and 
file of workmen still think of union activities in these 
terms. Actually, however, wages and hours now play a 
secondary role. 

The obsession of many top leaders of organized labor 
today is political power. This they already have in certain 
states. And in Congress there is an alarmingly large 
number of those who almost invariably vote the dictates 
of the labor bosses. One Congressman put it: "When 
labor says 'Jump,' I don't ask, 'Why?' I ask, 'How far?' ' 

Compulsory unionism makes it possible for leaders of 
labor to initiate and support political programs which 
may be completely repugnant to the vast majority of 
local members. In the absence of a "Right to Work" law, 
a dissenting worker must still pay his political assessments 
to the union or face the risk of losing his job or the 
displeasure of his union bosses. Some unions say bluntly: 
"Pay up or else!" 

Perhaps the most plausible argument advanced by 
opponents of "Right to Work" laws is that compulsory 
unionism eliminates the so-called free riders — those who 
accept the "benefits" of unionism without sharing in the 
costs. Some who study the records sometimes wonder 
if "benefits" is the correct word. 

It is inescapable that any free economy and any system 
of free choice are bound to have free riders. Our churches 



provide manifold benefits to our communities, but even 
the smallest hamlet has its free riders who don't belong 
to, or contribute to, the church. Red Cross, Community 
Chest, PTAs all have their free riders. We would not 
have it otherwise because the only alternative is com- 
pulsion. Americans resent compulsion. Our strength is 
the strength of free men. And the free market has 
been the basis of our great prosperity. Only in those 19 
states having "Right to Work" laws is the workingman 
free to sell his services as he chooses. 

I believe the "Right to Work" principle deserves status 
commensurate with those other great principles by which 
we Americans live: freedom of speech, freedom of as- 
sembly, and freedom of worship. 



REUTHER — continued from page 29 

choice by American wage earners. Recognizing this fact, 
anti-union employer organizations quickly developed a 
strategy to undermine the labor movement; the cam- 
paign for state legislation to prevent employers and 
unions from negotiating union-shop agreements in free 
collective bargaining was launched in earnest. 

The argument advanced by "Right to Work" advocates 
is that the union shop is some kind of compulsory burden 
unions load onto workers and employers. The fact, how- 
ever, is quite the reverse. Union-shop agreements are 
reached voluntarily. "Right to Work" laws, however, are 
a compulsory abridgment of the right of employers and 
employees, freely and voluntarily to negotiate. Far from 
taking government out of the lives of workers and out 
of the affairs of business, they put the government in the 
middle of free negotiations with an unreasoning veto. 

These employer-sponsored laws, draped in appealing 
"Right to Work" wrappings, conceal and confuse th.ir 
true purpose. Proponents of "Right to Work" legislation 
are not wage earners; they are employers. They do not 
speak for wage earners; they speak for employers. 

In Florida, for example, where such a law was passed, 
21 organizations requested the state Senate to pass the 
bill, and of these, 20 were employer organizations and 
one an association of sheriffs, that is, the Florida Peace 
Officers Association. These organizations are typical of 
those which regularly oppose the enactment of social- 
security legislation, of minimum-wage legislation, of 
civil-rights laws, and of other legislative proposals in 
which wage earners have a genuine interest. Similar lists 
of organizations, inch', ting the National Association of 
Manufacturers, support these measures in other states. 

It is significant, too, that the organizations which have 
opposed the rash of compulsory open-shop laws are 
organizations which have been identified with protection 
of the interests of the common man, with the principles 
of democracy and social equity. These are, first of all, 
the democratic labor movement, the great unions of the 
AFL-CIO, which are looked on by all the world as model 
organizations of free labor. They include religious groups. 

The proponents of "Right to Work" laws are those 
who stand to gain by the open shop. The opponents are 



30 



Togetheij/january 1959 



those who believe in democracy in the workplace and 
the right of workers freely to organize and negotiate con- 
ditions of employment in their own interest. 

Anyone who believes in improving the welfare of the 
individual worker would reasonably oppose "Right to 
Work" laws and support the union shop, as workers do 
when confronted with this choice. Wages of workers 
in states where the union shop is legal are higher, with 
a few minor exceptions, than in states where "Right to 
Work" laws have been enacted. Industries where the 
union shop prevails pay higher wages and provide more 
wage-earner benefits than those industries which do not 
work under union-shop rules. 

Much is said in argument for a "Right to Work" law 
about compulsory unionism, but in actuality there is no 
such thing. In a union shop, employers and wage earners 
voluntarily agree contractually on the pay and conditions 
of employment. The latter provisions, among many 
other requirements, specify in general that membership 
in the union is a condition of employment and that 
new workers after a reasonable time will become mem- 
bers of the union. Some contracts are modified to allow 
two-week periods every year or two in which people 
who choose not to belong to the union may withdraw. 
These contracts are negotiated in behalf of an affirmative 
majority of the workers in the plant. If a majority votes 
against a union-shop proposal it can be eliminated from 
the contract. 

There is a further injustice implicit in compulsory 
open-shop legislation. This results from a requirement 
of the federal labor law which says that equal union 
services must be provided every worker by the union 
whether he is a union member or not. These services 
include the negotiation of the contract which establishes 
the wages, hours, and working conditions, and which 
provides all the welfare benefits, the pensions, the sick 
pay, the paid holidays, the paid vacations, the guaranteed 
wage^ payments in the event of unemployment, the 
grievance procedure, health and safety rules, and dozens 
of other features that make life for a worker reasonably 
secure and tolerable. For the most part, union dues are 
the cost of maintaining these services, and there can be 
no honest defense of anyone's right to enjoy these services 
without paying a fair share of their cost. 

Within the United Auto Workers, and in some other 
unions, members who do not wish their dues to be 
spent for political activities can specify that the portion 
of their dues which might go for political activity be 
donated instead to some charitable organization. 

In effect, this permits an individual worker who hap- 
pens to be at odds with the majority of the work force 
to pay for the services the union provides without paying 
to support any political contention. The services he pays 
tor are extremely valuable by any calculation. 

A grave responsibility rests on the individual citizen 
to look behind labels and slogans in forming opinions 
about new regulations of our society. Proposals should 
be judged on what social effects they will have. Motives 
and methods of sponsors and opponents must be exam- 
ined. The thoughtful citizen in a democracy who will 
heed the advice of John Wesley to "think and let think" 
will not be misled by false labels on laws proposed to 
regulate him and his fellow man. 




H 



Dr. Nail Answers Questions About 

Your Faith 

and 

Your Church 

ow do crime, vice, and sin differ? 



Often they don't, and an evil act fits neatly into all 
three categories. Each one is an offense — a crime is an 
offense against law (which is public opinion), a vice 
against morality, and a sin against God. 

Furthermore, it may be said that the antisocial acts 
we call crimes, and the moral failures we call vices, 
and the willful disobedience against God that we call 
sin all merit punishment, each in its own way. 

The cost of sin is estrangement from God, and that 
is far more severe than any physical torture like burn- 
ing or freezing. Weeping and gnashing of teeth 
(mentioned in Matthew 24:51 and 25:30) are merely 
the outward expressions of the sinner's inner and 
unbearable loneliness because he is away from God. 

Our heavenly father is no sadist, enjoying the punish- 
ment of his erring children; yet, wise parent that he 
is, he does not put aside the punishments that have 
to come in an orderly, law-abiding universe. 



w, 



hat about thi9 'Jewish Christmas'? 



Time was — and not far gone — when Christians and 
Jews quarreled over the observance of Christmas in 
many communities. Recently, the observance of 
Hanukkah, Jewish feast of lights, has worked a change. 
Because it comes at Christmastime, it has been mis- 
called the "Jewish Christmas." 

Actually, the two are completely different. Hanuk- 
kah (mentioned in John 10:22) was instituted by 
Judas Maccabaeus, in 165 B.C., to celebrate the reopen- 
ing of the temple at Jerusalem alter it had been defiled 
by Antiochus Epiphanes. It usually begins on December 
25 and lasts eight days, with the ceremonial lighting 
of a candle each day. It is the observance of a military 
victory, with patriotic overtones. 

The feast, which is really a minor one among Jews, 
has been played up by Zionists and Americanized 
almost beyond recognition. 



Dr. T. Otto Nail is editor of The New Christian Advocate, 

a graduate of Garrett Biblical Institute, and the author of 

several books, the latest of which is The Bible When You Need 
It Most [Reflection Booh, Association Press). 



January 1959\Together 



37 



At a quiet inn in Pennsylvania's Pocono 
Mountains, dedicated Methodist men and 
women will assemble January 9-24 to 
ponder and to pray. The occasion is the 
annual meeting of the Methodist Board 
of Missions, which reviews the year just 
past and takes a long look ahead at 
national and world— commonly called 
"home" and "foreign"— missionary ef- 
forts. New overseas missionaries must be 



recruited (last year's total of 194 fell 41 
short of the annual goal). And money 
must be raised. From its New York offices, 
the Board supervises a $13.1 -million over- 
seas program supporting 1,576 mission- 
aries and some 16,000 trained Christian 
nationals in 44 lands. Today they face 
grave new problems as awakening coun- 
tries surge with nationalism and non- 
Christian faiths are vigorously revived. 



Are Toreign' Missions 



L 



OTS of people are asking the 
question, "Are foreign missions 
through?" Here are my answers: 

As paternalism? Yes. As the re- 
ligious side of a national superiority 
to an inferior people? Yes. As ag- 
gressive denominational desire for 
bigness? Yes. As providing the 
know-how for agricultural, econom- 
ic, technical, and educational up- 
lift? Wearing thin: on the way out. 

In the late 20s, I spoke to 24,000 
people in Chicago on the motives 
of Christian missions. My audience 
was kindly and polite, but disap- 
pointed. The mood was expressed 
by a layman: "If he wants to get us 
to support foreign missions he must 
put on the rousements, tell stories 
of need and success. Why talk about 
motives?" He took the motives for 
granted. But a generation later I am 
asked, "Are foreign missions 
through?" 

Why? Because many motives on 
which foreign missions lived, con- 
sciously or unconsciously, have worn 
thin. These three decades have sifted 
our motives and made many of 
them appear irrelevant. 

The thing that has dismayed many 
is that in the East man is on the 
march. "Coolie nations" are becom- 



ing cultured nations and, in turn, 
passing to control nations, control- 
ling their own destinies and the 
destinies of the world in the UN. 

A little more than a generation 
ago, Mahatma Gandhi was put out 
of a first-class compartment of a 
railway train in South Africa. As 
he walked the platform at midnight 
waiting for another train, he con- 
ceived his idea of non-violent non-co- 
operation: "I will not hate you but 
I will not obey you. Do what you 
like and I'll match my capacity to 
suffer against your capacity to inflict 
the suffering, my soul force against 
your physical force, and I'll wear 
you down with good will." Gandhi 
went to India, applied his idea, and 
won freedom for 400 million people. 

That began a chain reaction 
throughout the East. Now Africa 
is to be the battleground for human 
freedom within the next 10 years. I 
used to figure 25 years, but I've had 
to change my timetable after a visit 
to Africa last year. The battle is 
on now and the end is certain — im- 
perialism will go and men every- 
where will get their freedom. It is 
inevitable. 

It was an expensive expulsion 
when Gandhi was put off that train, 



for it meant the expulsion of the 
white man from the whole of the 
East as overlord. And Africa follows. 
You sow expulsion and you reap 
expulsion. It is a moral universe; you 
reap what you sow. 

This rise of the common man is 
linked with nationalism and often 
with the revival of the old religions. 
Man, nationalism, and ancient 
faiths are on the march, militant and 
aggressive. 

Now, what about Christian mis- 
sions in this rise of man, of na- 
tionalism, and the revival of the old 
faiths? Where do missions fit in? Is 
there a place for them? Are they 
squeezed out by the nature of this 
movement, which resents all for- 
eign interference in a land's cul- 
tural and national life? 

It would seem so, at first sight. 
But only at first sight. For if we 
look deeper, we see that the revival 
of the old faiths is accompanied by 
a steady inner decay. The inner 
sanctions are being dissolved by the 
acids of modern thinking. Those 
sanctions are losing their inner grip 
on the allegiances of men. 

As I travel through the East, an 
increasing impression is made upon 
me: We now face in the souls of the 



32 



Togetheiyjanuary 1959 



IfflM 



By 

E. STANLEY 

JONES 

\ Icth odist Missionary , 
Evangelist, and Author 



Through? 



educated classes an inner emptiness. 
The old is dead or dying; the new 
has not been born. They are be- 
tween two worlds — one gone and 
the other not yet come. 

We do not now have to speak 
against Buddhism, Shintoism, Hin- 
duism, or Mohammedanism. If we 
do, the loyalty of those faiths' ad- 
herents will rise up to oppose us. 
But if we speak to this emptiness, 
then all their inner yearnings will 
rise up to greet us. Human nature, 
too, abhors a vacuum. It has been 
said that the central neurosis of our 
times is emptiness. The human per- 
sonality cannot stand emptiness. It 
goes to pieces. It must have some- 
thing to fill this emptiness. 

Take Japan. The governor of a 
prefecture, a trustee of a Buddhist 
temple, said in introducing me to an 
audience: "I'm a man here tonight 
without a faith. I wish I had a faith. 
I envy those of you who do have 
a faith. But I'm a lost sheep. I've 
come here tonight to gain a faith, 
if possible, through the speaker — 
and I hope you will gain one 
through him, too." 

A doctor told me that tuberculo- 
sis has been ousted as the top killer 
in Japan by high blood pressure and 



? Grace, 

Grass, 

and 

Gumption' 




Dr. E. Stanley Jones 



o 



'N JANUARY 3, E. Stanley Joncs will be 75. Bui it's 
doubtful that this world-renowned Methodist missionary, 
evangelist, and author will pause long to celebrate. He's loo 
busy. More than 50 years' experience in the missions field has 
convinced him that opportunities for Christian witness today 
never have been greater, the need never more urgent. So he's 
on the road, keeping up his 45-year average of three speaking 
engagements a day — all told, some 50,000 public appearances. 
He probably has spoken face to face with more people, in 
more lands, than any other living man. 

How does he keep this pace? "Grace, grass, and gumption," 
declares the stocky, silver-haired whirlwind. "I reallv do eat 
'grass pills' that have vitamins in them. I try to live with 
gumption. But I depend almost entirely on the grace of God 
for body, mind, and spirit." 

Dr. Jones' half-century of trail blazing for Christianity 
began in India, where he soon launched a needed special 
ministry to high-caste Hindu and Moslem intellectuals. There 
he originated the Christian ashram — a week-long spiritual 
retreat — before popularizing the idea in America. And his 
experiences in India furnished material for his best-selling 
first book, The Christ of the Indian Road, since followed by 
more than a score of others. 

But, like John Wesley, Dr. Jones looks upon all the world 
as his parish. With the restless zeal of a circuit rider, he has 
visited every continent, circled the globe five times in the 
past decade. Believing evangelism his mission, he thrice has 
declined election as a Methodist bishop. 

Age has yet to slow this tireless crusader. "When I was 70," 
he smiles, "God told me he was going to give me the best 
10 years of my life— the 10 ahead. The first four have been 
the best yet — so good that I've already given advance notice 
1 want another 10-year extension!" 



January 1959\Together 



heart diseases. When I asked what 
was producing these ailments he 
told me, "Spiritual uneasiness." 

When defeat came to the Japa- 
nese in 1945, the bottom dropped out 
of their inner life. They were not a 
divine people, the emperor was not 
a divine being, they had no divine 
destiny to rule: It was as if, in our 
lives, both Christianity and democ- 
racy had been wiped out overnight. 



I 



N the five visits of three months 
each I have made to Japan since the 
war for evangelistic services, over 
110,000 have signed cards to be- 
come Christians. Those in charge 
estimate that about half of these ac- 
tually get into the Christian Church. 
In one Tokyo meeting, 885 people 
signed cards. In another meeting, 
665 signed them in the rain. The 
crowd held together in an open 
amphitheater to listen to my talk 
and take decisions in the rain! 

Saburo Kurusu, Japan's special en- 
voy to Washington before Pearl 
Harbor, said to me after the 
war: "Japan will never become a 
democracy until Japan becomes 
Christian." I asked him if he were 
a Christian. When he said he was 
not, I asked him if he didn't want 
to be. And he said he did. We knelt: 
he gave himself to Christ, and was 
baptized. 

I have seen the emperor twice and 
had two other appointments fixed, 
but couldn't make the dates. He 
knew what I would talk about — 
Christ. It is not impossible that he 
should become a Christian. The 
question of the crown prince's be- 
coming a Christian was raised in 
parliament and the government re- 
ply was: "As an individual, he has 
a right to choose his own faith. But 
if he became emperor he would 
have to go through certain Shinto 
rites." The brother of the emperor 
is teaching Old Testament history in 
a women's Christian college. He did 
not resent my urging him to become 
a Christian and thus lead his people 
into Christianity. 

In Korea, out of 3,000 students — 
mostly non-Christians — 1,196 signed 
decision cards in one meeting to 
become Christians. When Korea was 
deciding what kind of army chap- 
lains to have, a regiment of 500, 
again mostly non-Christians, was 



asked to vote as a sample of army 
sentiment. Four voted for Buddhist 
chaplains, six for Roman Catholic, 
and 490 for Protestant. So now 
there are Protestant chaplains in the 
army of a predominantly Buddhist 
country — by the army's sample vote. 

I spoke at one of these army meet- 
ings, presided over by a Protestant 
chaplain, and as I approached I 
found a squad of soldiers running up 
the hill in formation. When I asked 
where they were going I was told: 
"To your meeting." I've never had 
soldiers run. to my meetings before! 
The first man to make a decision 
was the Korean general in charge. 
[For another illuminating report, see 
The Cross Over Korea by Syngman 
Rhee, October, 1957, page 11.] 

India is tougher, for the old faiths 
have a greater hold. But here, too, 
the same emptiness is apparent. The 
chief minister of a state, a Hindu, 
said after the coming of independ- 
ence in introducing me: "Our prob- 
lem now is different. Formerly it 
was to gain independence, now it is 
to retain independence. If we are 
to retain it we must have character. 
There is no doubt that the impact 
of Christ upon human nature creates 
miracles of changed character. As 
such, we welcome it." 

The Hindu governor of a state 
said to me: "My religion and my 
philosophy have failed me. They 
have let me down. They gave me no 
resources to live by. So I'm upset 
by this calamity and am unfit for 
my work. I hate everything." 

To another high official, when he 
said he was "flat and stale," I took 
a bottle of my grass tablets, think- 
ing he needed vitamins. But he 
shook his head and said: "Physical- 
ly, I'm all right. But I'm fed up." 
Fed up because of the corruption 
and selfishness of his own party. I 
took him grass; what he needed was 
grace! When I complimented an- 
other leader for the progress his 
land had made, he sadly shook his 
head and said, "We have reached 
bottom." Empty — all of them. 

In the Belgian Congo, a revival is 
sweeping from village to village. [See 
Christ Comes to the Congo, Novem- 
ber, 1957, page 75.] Large crowds 
of 2,000 or 3,000 gather to confess 
their sins all night, the next day, 
and through the next night. And 
the sins they confess! Witch doc- 



tors confess they have deceived the 
people; members of a reform move- 
ment to keep the chiefs straight con- 
fess to a racket, looting the people. 
Again, all emptiness. 

And when it comes to Commu- 
nism, the toughest proposition of 
all, we soon will be facing the same 
disillusioned emptiness. At our Sat 
Tal ashram in India about 20 of the 
100 present were ex-Communists. 
We have never had so many of the 
educated classes seeking Christ. 

If the outer revival of old faiths 
is accompanied by a steady inner 
decay, the revival of nationalism 
also wears thin. After freedom 
comes, often disillusionment follows. 
The problems are not all solved, 
they are sometimes accentuated. It 
takes character to make freedom 
work. 

This inner emptiness, often under 
a blase exterior, is the outstanding 
thing in the world situation. It an- 
swers the question, "Are foreign 
missions through?" It resolves itself 
to this: "Is Christ through?" Is he 
a spent force? Can he fill that empti- 
ness? Can he put meaning and full- 
ness back into life? 



T. 



HE answer is: Yes, Christ can, 
to the degree he is tried. We call 
him a Savior for he saves now from 
emptiness, from sin, and from mean- 
inglessness. And as far as I can see, 
no one else can or does. As a Hindu 
put it to me: "There is a Moral 
Pivot in the world and the best life 
of East and West is more and more 
revolving about that Moral Pivot. 
That Moral Pivot is Christ." 

If the inadequate and irrelevant 
motives for Christian missions have 
gone, or are going, the real motive 
remains: Christ. 

But this puts a real challenge to 
the Christian missionary movement: 
Can it function vitally at this place 
of need — emptiness? To fulfill the 
outgrown motives was comparative- 
ly easy. This demands something. 
It demands a vital, contagious ex- 
perience of Christ. Maybe we will 
have to go deeper before we can go 
further. This new emphasis may 
evangelize the evangelists. But the 
need for Christian missions was 
never so great as now. For this emp- 
tiness is endemic in the East — and, 
increasingly so, in the West. 



34 



Togetheij/january 1959 




Methodism's Stake in the Newest State 



THE FIRST ALASKANS may have migrated from 
Asia by boat or by walking a few miles across the frozen 
Bering Strait into a land that primitive Aleutian islanders 
termed "al-ay-ek-sha" meaning "The Great Land!' It's a 
name modern Alaskans proudly adopt. 

Our 49th state is truly a land of superlatives. One-fifth 
as large as the U.S., its rivers teem with fish, and mighty 
glaciers grind down forever to the sea. Warm Pacific 
currents bring moderate temperatures to coastal regions, 
while in the vast Yukon the long winter night is cold — 
up to the tingling stars. 

Alaska's history has been largely one of exploitation by 



transient seal hunters, fishermen, and lumbermen who 
wanted only to remove, not improve. But today, Ameri- 
cans see this land of nearly 250,000 permanent residents 
as a brand-new frontier where opportunities abound. 
Many Alaskans are confidently predicting a population 
of 1 million by 1975. No longer do we think of The 
Great Land as "Seward's Folly" or "Uncle Sam's Icebox!' 
The pages that follow tell how Methodism, under the 
Division of National Missions, is busily assessing work 
already done and moving ahead. Here is the Church's 
greatest social and religious challenge since the first cir- 
cuit riders rode west of the Alleghenies. 



35 




Methodism's Stake (continued) 



Land of Contrasts 



ALASKA is a land where one finds 
new skyscrapers and native huts, the 
kayak and plane, railroads and old 
Indian trails. Its economy is based on 
fishing, lumber, agriculture, immense 
mineral wealth, gold, and a promis- 
ing oil potential. 

The Russians came to exploit 
Alaska as early as 1741. Missionaries 
of the Russian Orthodox Church first 
brought Christianity, and many of 
their onion-dome churches remain. 

Purchased from Russia in 1867 for 
$7.2 million — less than the cost of 
one atomic submarine — this is the 
richest and fastest-growing area un- 
der the American flag today. 



Blue la/^es will mirror the campsites of more and more 

tourists called north over the Alaska Highway (see map, right). 




GREAT FALLS 

UNITED STATES 



In a land of many glaciers, the most photographed is Mendenhall's mighty river of blue-white ice. 




Kennecott Copper 

ghost mill, abandoned 

in 1938, cascades down a 

hillside. It is visited 

mostly by tourists. 






Modern dairy and trucks farms now flourish in the fertile Matanus\a Valley near Anchorage . 



VM 



A smiling Eskimo girl symbolizes the old becoming the new. 




Totem poles aren't idols. They're merely history booths 
which remind Alas\an Indians of their heritage. 



January 1959\Togeth« 




37 




Hustling, dynamic Anchorage, Alaska's largest city, will be home for Methodism's 
newest university. With a climate similar to that of St. Paul, Minn., the area has a growing 
population of nearly 100,000, already boasts one of the world's busiest airports. 



Picnicking Methodists 

gather on the site of the 

new university, which is now 

under construction on a 

500-acre campus. 



38 







Spadewor\: a proud moment for Presi- 
dent-elect Ebright and Bishop Grant. 



Methodism's Stake {continued) 



Building for Tomorrow 



lk£<&±sj&. 




A io-year-old dream came true in June, 1958, with the dedication of 
Alaska Methodist University after completion of a $2 million fund drive. 



ALASKA Methodist University will 
open at Anchorage in the fall of i960. 
Strategically situated in an accessible 
and fast-growing region, this Chris- 
tian liberal-arts school expects a ca- 
pacity enrollment from among the 
hundreds of boys and girls now of 
high-school age. 

When the West was the U.S. fron- 
tier, the Church founded 11 colleges 
in territories. But because of distance 
and transportation problems, this is 
our first college founded in Alaska — 
although the Rev. J. H. Carr, our 
first missionary, arrived on Unga 
Island in 1886. 

Until now, the University of Alas- 
ka, near Fairbanks, has been the ter- 
ritory's only institution of higher 
learning. In the past, many promising 
youth have left to seek better educa- 
tional and job opportunities stateside. 



January 1959\Together 



39 




Room to worship: While their church is being built, Methodists 

on thinly populated Kenai Peninsula hold a service out-of-doors, using 

a portable organ provided by a circuit-riding "mobile ministry'.' 



' 


i 


O | 






Wb 1 



H'/M /o^ A<rwfl /rom wrg7» forest, these boys 
bridge a stream near Eagle River Youth Camp. 




«-■ ■ ■ 



/« Alaska they're going modern fast. Here's 
an architect's sketch of a proposed new church. 



By Air, It's Next Door 



ONCE A TRIP TO ALASKA meant a 2,000-mile voyage by 
boat. Instead of weeks, Anchorage today is only a few hours 
from Seattle by air — closer in time than New York to Chicago 
by train. Because of the airplane and the Alaska (Alcan) High- 
way, our 49th state joins the Union in fact as well as by law. 
When Methodist missionaries to Alaska began arriving in 
force around 1900, they preached in cabins, by rivers and lakes, 
in tents, and on hillsides. That hasn't changed much in many 
areas today. With usual "grit and grace" modern circuit riders 
go out by boat, jeep, and plane. Under leadership of Bishop A. 
Raymond Grant, of Portland, Ore., Methodist membership has 
jumped from 800 to 3,000 in 10 years, the number of churches 
from 8 to 26. Planned church construction for the immediate 
future is valued at $1 million. 




Ketchikan's First Methodist Church has more than 450 members 
and is self-supporting. Our mission wor\ began here $J years ago. 



40 



Together/January 1959 




An Eskimo woman is fashioning a s\in par\a 
at the Methodist Community Center in Nome. 
The Center, founded in 1913, ministers 
jointly to Eskimo and white populations. 




Tuberculosis once afflicted 80 per cent of the native population. Today 
it is steadily being wiped out. Until recently the Church operated a TB 
sanatorium at Seward where patients, including many children (see 
above), were given both medical treatment and educational training. 



'And Methodists come from miles around!" That's what always happens when a fellowship picnic is held in a homesteader's yard. 





Sunday school in the U.S.? Yes, but in a new state near • the Arctic Circle! 



Methodism's Stake {continued) 

Time Changes Many Things 

THE ALASKA of Dangerous Dan Mc- 
Grew, celebrated in the late Robert W. 
Service's poem, is gone. Igloos and tents 
have given way to modern houses. Dog 
trains are rare. Planes with skis and 
pontoons, used as routinely as autos in 
the U.S., whisk Alaskans quickly over 
their vast country. 

Methodist social service is keeping 
pace. One part of the program is child 
care, a concern of Methodist women as 
early as 1890. In a once wild and lawless 
land, hundreds of orphaned children — 
white "sourdough" and native alike — 
demanded more than food and clothing 
that could be shipped by boat. 

To meet this need, the Jesse Lee Home 
and School was founded in the Aleutian 
Islands 68 years ago. Today it is oper- 
ated near Seward as a project of the 
Women's Division of Christian Service. 
Typically, Alaska's state flag was de- 
signed by a boy at the home. He's one 
of hundreds who have left to become 
responsible and useful citizens in grow- 
ing Alaska. 



At the Jesse Lee Home, this girl is learning how to become a useful citizen. 

Snow-flecked mountains near Seward backdrop this Methodist haven for unwanted children. 










/ 



< 



A simple faith is tested, as a 



Little Boy 



Meets 



God 



a 



'UR LITTLE BOY is beginning 
to know God. It is a great experience. 

He is beginning to know about 
many things — about climbing over 
the play-yard fence, about making 
peanut-butter sandwiches, about rid- 
ing a scooter, and about using a pair 
of pliers. 

But he is not just beginning to 
know about God. He is beginning to 
know God. 

To our little boy, God is very real 
— not a hypothesis, not a subject for 
debate, not even just a "supreme 
power." He is a heavenly father and 
an earthly companion. They are 
always together. There are conversa- 
tions with him in a small voice dur- 
ing play sometimes. They are about 
angels, and Sunday school, and the 
weather up in heaven, and if our dog, 
Eloise, might please have puppies in 
the spring. 

This is not sacrilege. It is confi- 
dence. Our little boy has been taught 
to be reverent; he knows that God is 
great and God is holy. But he also 
knows that God is love. And this, 
to him, makes all the difference. 

He knows what it is to be loved by 
his family — to an overflowing meas- 
ure. And when he multiplies that 
love by the bigness and greatness 
and goodness of God, it comes out, to 
our little boy, a love that understands 




By ALLEGRA McBlRHEY 



all, is interested in everything, and 
withholds nothing. 

With all this love surrounding 
him, it is no wonder that our little 
boy worries about nothing. Last 
winter he lay ill with an acute infec- 
tion which the doctors could neither 
explain nor cure. His father and I 
were almost frantic with anxiety and 
fear. 

But our little boy was quietly talk- 
ing it over with God. At a time when 
we should have been reassuring him, 



The boy loved the toy dog. 

He would wind it with the \ey and 

let it romp on the floor, 

barking and wagging its tail. 

But one day it was missing. 



he was reassuring us. He reported 
that God knew all about his illness 
and, because He loved us very much, 
He would make things right. 

Soon the fever did subside and the 
doctors looked at us in amazement. 
But our little boy was not surprised. 

So mightily does he trust that his 
every prayer will be fulfilled to the 
letter that last summer, when God 
saw fit to answer one of his petitions 
in a way different from that re- 
quested, our little boy's faith under- 



January 1959\Together 



43 



getting along 

Together 



I had been ill for some time when a 
nine-year-old girl visited me shortly be- 
fore Christmas. We talked about the 
approaching holiday and she asked me 
what I wanted for Christmas. I told 
her all I wanted was to receive a box 
containing a note telling me that I was 
going to get well. 

On Christmas Eve we exchanged 
gifts, and in the box I opened was the 
following note: "Dear Bert: Don't 
worry, you are going to be all right. 
Love, Sandra" 

— Mrs. Roberta Scheffler, Washington, N.J. 



When my daughter's class drew 
names for the school Christmas party I 
remembered a similar affair years ago 
when a little boy was without a gift 
because someone had not brought one. 
I saw again the disappointment on that 
little boy's face. 

When I purchased the gift for my 
child to take, I bought a second present 
which I sent to the teacher in case some 
child should be without one. 

The day of the party, my little girl 

came home from school bright-eyed and 

happy. And with her she brought the 

extra gift I had sent. She was the one I 

had made happy! 

— Mrs. H. L. Smith, Lansing, Mich. 



Grandfather had a hotheaded neigh- 
bor who argued about everything. One 
day he said some dreadful things to 
Grandfather in front of me, then turned 
on his heel and went home. 

Grandfather said, "Don't pay any at- 
tention to what he said. He is just un- 
happy and has to take it out on some- 
one. He hasn't learned self-control." 

"How can you say nice things about 
that old coot when he says such mean 
things to you?" I asked. 

Grandfather smiled. "You know," he 
told me, "we both could be wrong!" 

— Mrs. Walter O. Sohre, St. Paul, Minn. 



Little tales for this column must be 
true — stories which brightened a day or 
lightened a heart. If yours is used, you 
will receive $5. Sorry, contributions 
cannot be returned. — Eds. 



44 



went some grave testing — and some 
growing, too. 

It all began when he received a 
windup dog for his birthday. It was 
an appealing little animal with black- 
plush fur, red-felt tongue, and unpar- 
alleled vitality. At the twist of a key 
it would romp across the floor, wag- 
ging its tail and barking in such a 
delightful fashion that our little boy 
jumped up and down in ecstasy. 

But one day the toy was missing. 
We looked everywhere. We asked 
everyone. And when we had ex- 
hausted our own resources, our little 
boy turned to God. 

He prayed earnestly that God 
would let him know what happened 
to the little dog. And God replied as 
requested. He let him know exactly 
what had happened to it. But he did 
not bring it back. 

In town-crier style a small neigh- 
bor made it known that the toy had 
been taken by another child, who 
remained unnamed. It was a diffi- 
cult situation. I didn't want to in- 
vestigate because I was afraid I might 
find out — and our neighbors were 
also our friends. 

So, meanwhile, our little boy re- 
worded his prayer: now that God 
had let him find out what had hap- 
pened to the dog, would he please 
make the child who took it bring 
it back. This, his revised petition, 
was repeated every night for weeks. 
It became a matter far exceeding the 
toy's own importance. 

And so, gradually, we felt the time 
had come to tell our little boy some- 
thing about God which he did not 
know. 

"God doesn't ever make people do 
anything," his father told him, "not 
even return a toy. He wants us to 
choose all by ourselves whether we 
want to do the right thing or the 
wrong thing. And if we love him, 
we'll choose the right thing. 

"You know, God could make 
everybody do the right thing," his 
father continued. "He could bring 
all stolen things back and not let 
people get hurt." 

Our little boy's expression sug- 
gested that this would be a fine idea. 

"But then, you see, we wouldn't 
really be God's children — we'd be his 
windup toys. We wouldn't be doing 
good things out of love for him, but 
because he was 'winding us up' and 
making us act that way." 



This was, indeed, a big lesson for 
so small a boy. We didn't know how 
much of it his little thoughts and 
little experiences could grasp, but we 
knew it would be a beginning — a 
beginning in learning why toy dogs 
and other happinesses are not always 
given us, however earnest our 
prayers. 

Tonight, as our little boy knelt 
down for prayers, he worked his 
tight-folded hands between mine and 
spoke in a loud voice so no one, 
especially God, would miss a word. 

"Dear Father, please, for Jesus' 
sake, bless Mommy . . ." he began. 

And somehow, as always, I felt the 
very blessing he was requesting 
descend upon me. So in touch is our 
lamb with his Shepherd that he 
seems able to pray down a benedic- 
tion that the most recognized saints 
could not surpass. 

Our little boy is, indeed, beginning 
to know God. 

And his father and mother — we 
realize now — are just beginning to 
know God, too. We thought we 
knew him all along. The truth is, 
we were acquainted with his great- 
ness — but never with his simplicity. 
We thought we trusted him — but 
never would we relinquish our 
anxieties. We understood that he 
loved us — but never did we feel that 
love until we saw it shine on and 
through our little boy. 

"We're preparing him for the king- 
dom of heaven," his father and I 
used to think. But now as we grow 
with our little boy, gradually we 
realize the truth: 

He is preparing us. 



READER'S CHOICE 

This intimate story of a little 
boy's simple trust in God, and how 
his parents learned from it, was 
suggested by Mrs. Edith D. Betten, 
San Jose, Calif. It is reprinted 
here by permission from Family 
Weekly, a Sunday supplement for 
newspapers, where it appeared in 
the issue of April 22, 1956. 

Now, what's your favorite story? 
Just send its title, author, and 
place of first publication to 
Reader's Choice Editor, Together, 
740 N. Rush St., Chicago 11, III. 
If it's used, you'll receive $25. But 
remember, please: just one nom- 
ination per letter. — Eds. 



Together/January 1959 



Teens Together 



mm I'm 14 and I go steady with a 
^W boy of 20. He has a good job 
and wants to marry me. I \now I am 
too young. He has been arrested for 
reckless driving many times and has a 
bad reputation. If I say, "no" to him, 
will I ever meet another boy who wants 
to marry me? — L.C. 



A 



I'm sure you will. Better say, 
'no," and talk the whole thing 

over with your mother. In the future, 

go with younger boys. 



■ ■ I'm 18 and in love with a mar- 
l*' ried man, 21. Formerly we were 
engaged. He tried to make me jealous 
by dating another girl. Then he mar- 
ried her and I felt awful. Last night 
he phoned me and said I'm the one he 
really loves. He wants me to wait while 
he gets a divorce, then marry him. I 
said, "no." I shouldn't break up his 
marriage, should 1? — A.L. 



No. Go out with suitable boys. 
You'll find one who is a better 



A. 
bet 



11 I'll be in a debate soon. I'm ex- 
1& pected to prove that teen-agers 
are worse now than they were when 
our folios were kids. Will you help 
me?—R.B. 



A You'll have to discriminate be- 
tween types of teen-agers. The 
percentage of rough, delinquent teen- 
agers has grown. They commit more 
serious crimes than the tough kids did 
when your folks were teen-agers. How- 
ever, the majority of young people are 
as fine as any generation ever has been. 
Most teen-agers are at least as good as 
their folks were at the same age. 

II I'm 14, and for the first time 
\? I'm considering asking a girl for 
a date. Where can I learn about this 
dating jazz? — 0.1. 



M Start with the Methodist 
LwL Data for Dating. Order it from 



leaflet, 

the Department of the Christian 
Family, PO Box 871, Nashville 2, Tenn. 



By Richmond Barbour 



Then get E. M. Duvall's book, The 
Art of Dating, published by the Young 
World Press, 17 Washington Place, 
New York City 11. 

■ H I'm 17, and hare a brother, five. 
^W My mother expects me to take 
my brother almost every place I go. 
My boy friend and I had to take him 
to a football game yesterday. We've 
taken him to picnics, too. Is that fair? 
-J.D. 



M Probably it isn't. In most families 

_ teen-agers aren't expected to 

take little brothers along on dates. 

■ ■ / have a new brother-in-law. I 
W guess he's all right, but he is too 
affectionate. I can't stand to have him 
kiss my cheeky and pat me on the 
shoulder. Should I ask_ my mother to 
tell him how I feel? Or should I tell 
him myself? — C.S. 



Have your mother tell him. 
lb. Probably she can explain things 



without hurting his feelings. 



flB I'm the oldest of five boys. My 
W parents pick on me - ^be others 
sweet tal\ them out of everything. I 
have to do more work than they do. 
Why do my parents play favorites? 
—P.O. 



A They don't intend to. In nearly 
all families the oldest child has 
a more difficult time than the younger 
ones. Many parents expect too much 
from them. Talk with your parents 
about this. Ask them to discuss the 
work you do with the parents of other 
boys your age. Probably they'll see 
things in a new light. 

« ■ I'm a girl of 19. I'm too shy to 
^§P have friends. In all my life only 
one girl ever phoned me, and I dated a 
boy once. He didn't come back- ' 
finished high school last June, and I've 
been dismissed from two jobs since. 
Now I'm afraid to leave my room. I 
have bad nightmares. Sometimes I feel I 




Dr. Barbour: For each teen-ager's 
problem, careful study. 



am suffocating. My parents want me to 
see a psychiatrist. Must I? Or will I just 
die here?— H.N. 



M. Be sure to see a psychiatrist. 
XT& He'll help you find ways to over- 
come some of your shyness and be 
happy. 



/ hate homework^. My mother 
is a teacher. She said that you 
had written articles saying homework 
is a poor way to learn anything. I hope 
she's right! Is she? — M.K. 



M Not quite. I've written articles 
^t«. urging teachers to have pupils 
do their assignments in class, under 
their supervision. School researchers 
have known for many years that super- 
vised classroom study was more efficient 
than home study. However, class peri- 
ods are short in most schools. Teachers' 
schedules are crowded. You'll continue 
to receive homework. Better get it done. 

m I'm a girl of 16, and I go with 

I? a senior, 17. He is student-body 

president, and gets A grades. He plans 



January 1959\Together 



45 



Looks at movies 



I 



By Harry C. Spencer 

General Secretary, Methodist Television, Radio, and Film Commission 



• Films are rated for audience suit- 
ability. Also, the symbols (-J-) and ( — ) 
provide "yes" or "no" answers to the 
question: Do the ethical standards in 
the film in general provide constructive 
entertainment? 

Damn Yankees: Adult ( + ) 

This is a modernization in comedy 
and music of the Faust legend. A base- 
ball fan (Tab Hunter) hates the New 
York Yankees so much he sells his 
soul to satan to become a young home 
run hitter for the Washington Senators. 
To do this he has to leave his wife, 
whom he loves dearly. When the 
Senators are about to win the pennant 
over the hated Yankees, Tab tries to 
cancel the satanic agreement and return 
to his wife and home. Satan does not 
want this soul to escape and sends Lola 
(Gwen Verdon), another lost soul, to 
tempt Tab. Songs from the popular 
stage musical are used in the film with 
lull comedy effect. 

Man of the West: Adult ( — ) 

This Western starring Gary Cooper 
is so full of sadistic cruelty it is hardly 
entertainment. Cooper, a reformed 
gunman, is entrusted with money to 
hire a schoolteacher, but loses it when 
his train is held up. Cooper, Julie 
London, and Arthur O'Connell are left 
behind when the train pulls out and 
are captured by Cooper's former out- 
law gang. To protect Julie and to get 
back his gold, Cooper determines to 
kill the captors one by one. He does. 

The Barbarian and the Geisha: 

Adult ( + ) Youth ( + ) 

The panoply of scenic beauty of the 
film, photographed in Japan, more than 
compensates for story line faults. John 
Wayne is an American consul general 
sent to Nippon after Perry's gunboats 
had persuaded her to sign a treaty 
granting diplomatic representation. 
Since the oriental rulers had no inten- 
tion of honoring the treaty, Wayne's 
job involves patient waiting. The delay 
is made less unpleasant by Eiko Ando, 
a geisha, sent to his home to spy on 
him, but who develops a fondness for 
him. The film creates a new sympathy 
for the Japanese and a deeper under- 
standing of their way of life. 



46 



Onionhead: Adult ( — ) 

This could have been a good, posi- 
tive picture, because it deals with several 
significant wartime social and moral 
questions. It could have been a first-rate 
comedy, for the cast is headed by Andy 
Griffith, Felicia Farr, and Walter Mat- 
thau. But the producers mix the two 
dramatic forms without a clear-cut 
point of view, and the audience laughs 
at the wrong places. The story involves 
the romances of a college student, Andy, 
who enlists in the Coast Guard because 
his girl was flirting with another boy. 

Tunnel of Love: Adult ( — ) 

Marital infidelity seems a laughing 
matter according to this somewhat 
cleaner version of the stage play by the 
same name. Doris Day and Richard 
Widmark are trying to adopt a baby, 
but the baby-fold interviewer gets a 
poor impression of Richard's qualifica- 
tions as a father. This causes a quarrel 
between Doris and Richard; where- 
upon he invites the caseworker to din- 
ner, gets drunk, and wakes up the 
next morning in a motel. Later the 
caseworker asks him for $1,000 because 
she is going to have a baby. Months 
later the baby fold informs Doris and 
Richard there is a baby they can adopt. 
And so forth. 

Blood of the Vampire: Everybody 
(-) 

Inept, gruesome story of a doctor, 
who was a vampire killed with a stake 
through his heart. He returns to life 
and runs a laboratory in a mental in- 
stitution where he takes blood from 
patients for his personal experiments. 
A minus for everybody and we hope a 
deficit for the producer. 

A Town Like Alice: Adult ( + ) 

For sheer tragedy there is nothing 
more pathetic than a group of refugee 
women with their children trudging 
along a muddy path in a torrential 
rain. That is the story in this film 
based on incidents in World War II 
in southeast Asia. For nearly six months 
they walked while one after another 
they die of starvation or disease. The 
photography is realistic and the acting 
is so good it seems to be documentary. 



to become a minister. Unfortunately, 
he loof^s li\e my sister's husband. My 
sister divorced him because he was bad. 
My mother things I should find a boy 
friend who doesn't loo\ li\e him. Is 
that a good reason? — L.L. 

A Take your boy friend's grade 
cards home, and show them to 
your mother. Ask her to talk with 
some teachers and your minister about 
him. It isn't right to condemn him 
because he looks like someone else. 

I'm 17 and on the football team. 
W There's a college woman I li\c. 
She is 21, divorced, and a senior. She 
as\ed me to a dance. My dad says I'm 
too young to date her. Should 1 obey 
him?- — J.S. 



Yes. 



B My Sunday-school teacher said I 
wf should as/^ my mother some 
questions about sex. I did, but my 
mother said she didn't want to answer 
them. Everything I've learned about sex 
has come from the gutter. Who should 
teach me? — H.A. 



M Your mother and father, if they 
X SL can - However, many parents are 
unable. That is why some public schools 
have sex-education courses. Get the 
Methodist booklet, Sex Facts for 
Adolescents from the Department of 
the Christian Family, PO Box 871, 
Nashville 2, Tenn. It will answer your 
questions. 



Do parents want their teen-agers 
to lie to them? Sometimes when 
I tell my father the truth he things I'm 
lying. He even punishes me. Should a 
boy be punished for telling the truth? 
-J.K. 

Not for telling the truth. Keep 
il. on being honest. Your father 
will learn he can trust you. Parents 
don't want their teen-agers to lie. 



Need Guidance? As\ Dr. Barbour. 
An experienced counselor to teen-agers, 
he will suggest a way out of your dif- 
ficulties and will keep your name and 
address confidential. Write him c/o 
Together, 740 N. Rush St., Chicago 
11, III.— -Eds. 



Together/January 1959 



|%ljt Unto JE^ |fotl} 



WEEKLY MEDITATIONS BY PASTORS ON THE INTERNATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSONS 



DECEMBER 21 

And Mary said, "My soul 
magnifies the Lord, and my 
spirit rejoices in God my 
Savior." — Luke 1:46-47 

jD URING my junior year at col- 
^2Jp lege, I really learned what 
the spirit of Christmas means. In 
my first two years, I spent all the 
money I had earned and saved 
toward my education. Now, as a 
junior, I had to borrow what I 
could not earn. 

My sister, teaching school, was 
willing to lend me whatever 
I needed.ln fact, it was her custom 
to send me $100 and say, "See how 
long you can make it last." 

When it came time to purchase 
a few Christmas gifts, it seemed 
foolish to borrow money to spend 
that way. So I did not give a single 
gift. 

I do not recall that I ever re- 
ceived any more wonderful gifts 
than I did that year. My family 
and friends all knew the circum- 
stances and gave me clothing, 
books, notebooks, and a type- 
writer. It was a thrill to open so 
many presents, but the deep joy 
that usually accompanies the 
opening of gifts was missing. J 
realized for the first time that the 
real joy of Christmas comes in giv- 
ing, not in receiving. 

In our text, Mary has discovered 
the joy of Christmas, even before 
that first Christmas Day. She has 
discovered that the joy in living 
comes from giving. She is so happy 
about having given herself to be 
an instrument of God's will that 
she cries out, "My soul magnifies 
the Lord, and my spirit rejoices 



January 1959\Together 




Kcrmit Long 

Phoenix, Ariz. 



in God my Savior." You, too, will 
discover the real joy of Christmas 
when the gifts you give are pre- 
sented in love. 

}Jrauer: Our Father God, we 
thank thee for the joy which Mary 
found in giving herself to be a 
servant of thine. Help us during 
this Christmas season to give our 
gifts in remembrance of thy Son, 
in whose name we pray. Amen. 

— Delbert E. Jolley 

DECEMBER 28 

Simon Peter replied, "You 
are the Christ, the Son of the 
living God."— Matthew 16: 16 



m 



[HAT DO YOU know— for 
sure?" is a half -facetious, 
half-serious greeting of college 
students. Underneath lies a deep 
desire to know — for sure. Most of 
us know something of the same 
hunger. 

Many of us know the answers 
to "What do I want?" and "How 
am I going to get it?" But we can- 
not answer clearly the question, 
"What do I believe?" 

Something to affirm — for sure — 
is the deepest desire of our day. 
A vital faith depends upon a 
simple, clear-cut affirmation. Life 
is constructed around the posi- 
tive pole and every man needs 
this sense of something eternally 
meaningful to believe in and live 
for. 

What do you know — for sure — 
about Christ? Peter's final re- 
sponse to our Lord's insistence 
might well be called Christianity's 
Ten-Word Creed. Our similar af- 
firmation will result in a powerful 
affection for Christ, which, in 
turn, will develop the passion of 
love that knows no limits. 

From affirmation to affection to 
allegiance is the history of our 
spiritual journey. We cannot 
merely have an alliance with 
Christ for our mutual benefit; we 
must have an undying allegiance 
to him as the Son of the living 
God. 

What do you know — for sure — 
about Christ? You may be reli- 
gious and you may be devout and 
righteous, but unless you can an- 
swer with Peter you cannot be 
fully Christian. This revelation of 
truth which grows out of personal 
association with the Master comes 
in a wide variety of ways and 
in patterns as diverse as mankind 
itself, but it always demands an 
answer — for sure. 



•)Jraucr: Grant unto us in this 
New Year, O God, the personal 
experience of knowing — for sure 
— thy Son as our living Lord. 
Amen. 

— William E. Trice 

JANUARY 4 

And Jesus said to him, "If 
you can! All things are pos- 
sible to him who believes." 
—Mark 9:23 

( TC'DISON, in his belief in the ap- 
21£ plication of heaven-sent elec- 
tric currents to the uses of man- 
kind, tried "impossible" ways in 
his search and finding of the possi- 
ble. He held to his belief in the 
possible even when criticized. 

God holds the possibilities for 
all things in his heart and hands. 
We are called upon by Christ to 
make the discovery and the appli- 
cation to our needs. 

We are challenged to believe 
that the discovered ways of God 
will work in the most minute 
things as well as in the largest 
areas of life. They are actively at 
work in the invisible atom and in 
the reaches of space. 

And all things within these 
realms can be utilized for the bane 
or blessing of God's children, for 
the curse or the cure of man in 
all his frailties and sins. God's 
reservoirs of goodness seem wait- 
ing for our belief in their utiliza- 
tion for man's good. 

Jesus' words and life also in- 
spire us to the belief and the appli- 
cation of it in those vital working 
ways of God, both in our personal 
lives and in that fellowship of all 
believers. His healing and redeem- 
ing powers at work in our lives 
are also for the salvation of the 
world and for the glory of his com- 
ing kingdom. When we cry out in 
our earnestness and anxiety for 
the redemption of others, as did 
this father to whom Jesus spoke, 
for a faith equal to the demands 
upon us, the response can well go 
far beyond our highest hopes. 
When we believe in God he some- 
how fills in the gaps of unbelief 
and reaches out beyond our 
limited goals. He leads the way. 

grayer: O Lord and Master of us 
all, we thank thee for the confi- 
dence which thou doth inspire so 
that we can face all experiences 
with a feeling of ultimate victory. 
With growing faith and humble 
devotion, we would be so com- 
pletely committed to thee that 



nothing will separate us from thy 
great love. Purify us and guide 
us in ways that will help us show 
our belief in our lives. Amen. 

— S. Raymond Luthy 

JANUARY 11 

But he said, "What is impos- 
sible with men is possible with 
God."— Luke 18:27 

5V LL THINGS are possible with 
sfc\ God and those who put their 
trust in him. 

The big question was asked of 
Jesus by a ruler: "What shall I 
do to inherit eternal life?" The 
Master reminded him of the com- 
mandments, which the ruler said 
he had kept. However, this man 
was rich. There is no sin in pos- 
sessing money, but evidently this 
man's money was possessing him. 
Jesus told him, "One thing you 
still lack. Sell all that you have 
and distribute to the poor, and 
you will have treasure in heaven; 
and come, follow me." 

The man declined. Here follow 
the disturbing words of Jesus, 
"For it is easier for a camel to go 
through the eye of a needle than 
for a rich man to enter the king- 
dom of God." 

Those who heard these words 
asked, "Then who can be saved?" 
They knew, as we know, that 
though we are not all wealthy we 
have areas of our lives not yet 100 
per cent surrendered to the will of 
the Father. Our works are not 
good enough to assure us entrance 
into the Kingdom. Nor will they 
ever be. At this point Jesus says, 
"What is impossible with men is 
possible with God." Herein is our 
only salvation. 

Man's need is great. God's love 
is greater still. The grace of God, 
which forgives the penitent, is his 
love in action. This is always 
poured out upon us, not according 
to our merit, but according to our 
need. God's grace is sufficient. But 
even this will not be forced upon 
us. Those who let Christ in 
and seek his forgiveness will be 
saved, not because of the good 
they do, but because of the eternal 
goodness and perfect love of the 
Father. 

grayer: God, our Father, grant us 
that deep assurance of thy 
strength that makes us more than 
we are. Enable us to visualize true 
greatness as spirit with Spirit is 
linked. Amen. 

— Kermit Long 



48 



Together/January 1959 



Barnabas takes 



Looks 
at 

New 
Books 




Preacher's kjd Ike Nies gets a "lift" from his dad. 



N< 



I O one will ever accuse Field Mar- 
shal the Viscount Bernard Law 
Montgomery, of El Alamein fame, 
of hiding his light under a basket. 
Monty is a military man who believes 
in speaking his mind. He does just 
that in his new book, The Memoirs of 
Field-Marshal Montgomery (World, 
$6). And plenty of chips go flying. 

Here is a leader who has known the 
greats of his age; a man who has 
played a major role in writing the 
history of this and future ages. From 
service in India and Egypt in that long- 
ago era of peace, through two World 
Wars, and on into the cold war, Mont- 
gomery has been at the front. Here he 
tells you how he saw things — and why 
he was right in his decisions. 

This is a book which is enjoyable 
from first word to last. But I got a 
special lift out of a note on the jacket: 
"Every word of the book was written 
in pencil in my own handwriting. 
Montgomery of Alamein, F.M." 

From the opposite side, there's a new, 
fascinating view of World War II now 
in print. It's Operation Sea Lion (Ox- 
ford, $7), Ronald Wheatley's factual 
account of Nazi Germany's plans to in- 
vade England after the collapse of 
France. 

Here from the official records, you 
get an hour-by-hour close-up of the 

January 1959\Together 



German war machine as it girded its 
loins for the dangerous hop across the 
English Channel. You see disputes 
among commanders over landing 
sites, air cover, naval protection; you 
watch as troops are concentrated and 
dummy cover plans set up. And, most 
interesting of all, you see Hider torn 
between two ambitions — to invade 
England and to conquer Russia. With 
the final decision to strike eastward, 
the invasion plan dies. 

It would be hard to imagine a closer 
seat to an "almost" of history than this. 

Ministers' babies aren't born with 
built-on halos. Instead they come 
equipped with all the mischief, curios- 
ity, and irrepressibility of other young- 
sters — despite tsk-tsks and lifted eye- 
brows of parishioners. 

Fortunately, the parsonage parents 
usually have an added measure of pa- 
tience, wit, and understanding. Typical 
are Lee and Myrtie Nies, parents of 
Grace Nies Fletcher. Mrs. Fletcher's 
story of the trials, tribulations — and joys 
she and her brother Ike met head-on 
as they grew up in New England is 
warmly and tenderly told in Preacher's 
Kids (Dutton, $3.75). 

Methodists will remember Lee Nies 
as a pastor at Worcester and other 
Massachusetts cities and superintendent 



of the Springfield District. Here we 
see him as a father who let his son 
hold on to his coattails when he was 
learning to skate, who would let his 
children get up at midnight for ice 
cream in the parsonage kitchen because 
he couldn't bear to have a treat with- 
out them. 

Preacher's Kids is rich with anec- 
dotes that are funny, poignant, and in- 
spiring by turns. There is Grace, heart- 
broken because her best beau has asked 
her to lead the military ball with him 
and the Discipline won't let her dance. 
There is Ike taking his pet rats to a 
little girl's birthday party or using cat- 
nip to lure the family cat into creating 
havoc during a ladies' aid tea. There 
is Lee Nies in the parlor kneeling in 
prayer with an alcoholic. There is 
Myrtie playing cupid for a couple that 
had been "going steady" for years. 

And always there is the joyousness, 
love, and sureness of faith that made 
being a "P.K." in this family a privi- 
lege indeed. 

When our children were small Mrs. 
Barnabas didn't talk baby talk to them. 
"They might as well learn the language 
right in the first place," was her view. 

But lions are different. I have often 
seen her at the zoo, cooing at a 2,000- 
pound king of the beasts. So when I 



49 



wmmm*m 



. WBk. 




Successors 

to the 

Circuit 

Riders 




The Methodist Theological Schools Association is to meet 
January 10, and that set us to pondering the divine pull 
that makes ministers out of ordinary men. Preachers' lives 
today are different from Wesley's and Asbury's, but the 
depth of their dedication is the same. In this issue Barnabas 
reviews Preacher's Kids, by a minister's daughter. One 
Mile From Trinity, by a preacher's wife, was reviewed 
November, 1958 [page 49]. Both are family-eye views of 
Methodist ministers. Here are books on the various tvays 
five other men of God entered in his service. — Eos. 

The Living of These Days, by Harry Emerson Fosdick 

(Harper, $4), is the autobiography of a boy, similar to one you 
might know in the next block, who grew up to become one of 
the great preachers of our time and pastor of New York City's 
big Riverside Church. [Reviewed November, 19 56, page 5 6.] 

Shadoiv of the Almighty, The Life and Testament of Jim 
Elliot, by Elisabeth Elliot (Harper, $3.75), tells of one of 
the five young missionaries killed in Ecuador by the savage 
Indians they sought to serve. Based on his journal and letters, 
this book by his wife, also a missionary, is eloquent and restrained. 

Billy Graham, by Stanley High (McGrau-Hill, $1.98), is 
the biography of the evangelist who has probably preached to 
more people face to face than any other minister of Christ. The 
author, incidentally, is the son of a Methodist preacher. [Re- 
viewed November, 1956, page 64.] 

Prison Is My Parish, by Park Tucker as told to George 
Burnham (Retell, $2.9 5), describes the work of the chaplain of 
Atlanta Federal Penitentiary among some of the country's 
toughest criminals. This big preacher, who lost an arm in a 
coal-mining accident when he was a boy, has graduated nearly 
2,000 prisoners from his Bible-study course. 

A Testament of Faith, by G. Bromley Oxnam (Little, Brown, 
$)), is a statement of the beliefs of a Methodist bishop. An 
excerpt from it appeared as a personal testimony in Together 
[February, 1958, page 10] under the title, 1 Believe in Man. 
It is a significant book that makes rewarding reading. 



brought home Alex Kerr's No Bars 
Bet w e e n ( Appleton-Century-Crofts, 
$3.75) she promptly claimed it, and 
dinner was late that evening. 

Kerr, who has a mixed lion and 
tiger circus act, follows the tradition 
of the great animal trainers — getting 
results with love and psychology. His 
book is an affectionate account of his 
experiences with animals he has known 
and loved — Nizam, the tiger who 
walked on a leash; Negus the lion 
tightrope artist; Rajah the circus lion 
who died of a broken heart when he 
was retired, and many others with re- 
markably human virtues and foibles. 
You'll enjoy meeting all of them. 

Homer Croy is a writing fellow 
who handles phrases, facts, and figures 
as a circus juggler does baseballs — 
grinning as they are spinning. Latest 
proof is a biography about a U.S. mar- 
shall who helped bring law to Okla- 
homa. His name is Chris Madsen. The 
book is Trigger Marshall (Duell, Sloan 
and Pearce, $4.50). 

Madsen was a blue-eyed Dane who, 
after a five-year hitch with the French 
Foreign Legion, joined up with the 
U.S. Army just in time to help bury 
overlooked victims of Custer's debacle 
out in Montana in 1876. By a lugubri- 
ous slip-up, Madsen later discovered his 
own name on a heroic monument 
honoring the fallen. His protest to the 
War Department was spurned. Seems 
that records showed he had been killed 
and, says Croy with the whimsy that 
bubbles unsuppressed through the 
pages, "he would have to stay killed." 

Croy's estimate of Chris Madsen is 
that he was "a greater peace officer 
than Wyatt Earp — greater by far." 
After a few rapt hours with Trigger 
Marshal, I'd agree! 



Time of Life 

Years, in our youth, arc endless; 

Years, in old age, are slow. 
But the constant riddle 
Of years in the middle 

Is, where on earth do they go? 
— Hal Chadwick 



If you like your Western history 
firsthand, a hefty new volume titled 
The Great West (Coward-McCann, 
$11.50) is for you. Its editor, Charles 
Neider, has assembled self-told ac- 
counts of the winning of the West 
from Coronado to Emerson Hough. 
They're split into three groups, Path- 
finders, Heroes and Villains, and Ob- 



Together/January 1959 



Last Minute Gift Suggestions.. 

For Anyone on Your List 




Christmas 



Edited by R. E. Haugan. An American annual of Christ- 
mas literature and art that features this year: The 
Christmas Gospel illustrated in full color; Lee Mero's 
picture story, "Memories Are A Part Of Christmas"; 
Yuletide in England, Sweden, and the Tyrol; The Salz- 
burg Singers, with photographs; "People And Places In 
Nativity Narratives"; an article on the manner in which 
artists and sculptors have celebrated the birth of the 
Savior through the centuries; special music and poetry; 
and full color art inserts for framing. (AU) 

Cloth binding postpaid, $3.50 

Paper binding postpaid, $1 .50 

Christmas Ideals 

You will delight in the artistic presentation of old- 
fashioned Christmas ideals, thoughts, homey philosophy, 
neighborliness and inspiration found in this Christmas 
Ideals book. This wholesome and beautiful Christmas book 
helps you enjoy again the Christmas poems that you have 
known and loved; and includes carols of Christmas that 
you cherish. The full color art reproductions are lovely 
enough to frame. Anyone on your Christmas list will be 
proud of this 1958 edition of Christmas Ideals. 
(ID) postpaid, $1 .50 



Make Your Christmas Shopping Easy 
Give A Gift Card Or Certificate! 



Looking for a Christmas gift that 
is sure to please? Your problem 
is solved when you give that 
special friend or relative a gift 
card or certificate. Cards or 
certificates may be used to pur- 
chase any books or gifts the 
bearer may choose from the 
Cokesbury Book Stores or The 
Methodist Publishing House- 
either by mail or by personal 
shopping. 

It is easy to do your Christmas 
shopping this year — just send a 
gift card or certificate for any 
amount that you wish, and let 
your friends or relatives select 
that "something special" they 
have been wanting. 

Gift cards and gift certificates 
are always in good taste and are 
always appreciated. Your gifts 
will be the best ever, if you send 
gift cards or certificates this 




"(Sift ttertifiratf 









CofcesburutooK STOM 



CHRISTMAS GIFT CARD 

Here is a Christmas folder with an 
appropriate card attached for you to fill 
out — authorizing your relatives or friends 
to choose by mail or by personal shopping 
any book or gift up to the amount you 
specify, which will be charged to your 
account when the bearer makes his pur- 
chase. 

These Christmas gift cards and envelopes 
are Free — just mail a post card requesting 
the number of cards you want — and we 
will open a charge account in your name 
if you do not already have one. Christmas 
gift cards are as good as cash in any of 
our Branches or Stores. 



CHRISTMAS CIFT CERTIFICATE 

You may order a Gift Certificate for any 
amount from $1.00 up. Just enclose pay- 
ment or instructions for charging the value 
of the certificate to your account, and 
give the name and address of the person 
to whom it is going. We'll mail the certif- 
icate to whomever you specify — or to you, 
if you prefer to mail it with your Christ- 
mas card. 

A Christmas Gift Certificate is as good 
as cash at any of our Branches or Stores 
and may be used to purchase any books 
or gifts the bearer may choose — either by 
mail or by personal shopping. Send a 
Christmas Gift Certificate this year! 



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January 1959\Together 



57 




Song 
for the 



A^es 




The chapel service had 

begun simply with a few preselected 
hymns. Now an adult leader was 
asking the group of teen-agers to 
pick one of their favorites. Immedi- 
ately a hand shot up. "The Old 
Rugged Cross," the boy volunteered. 
There was a murmur of approval, 
and soon the familiar words and 
rhythmic melody filled the room. 

Only a few of the boys were 
watching the frail, white-haired man 
who stood before them in a worn 
tweed overcoat. As they swung into 
the chorus, his softly lined face 
tightened and he reached for his 
handkerchief to dab at a tear. It was 
then an amateur photographer 
snapped the candid picture above — 
a picture of George Bennard, who 
more than 40 years before had writ- 
ten The Old Rugged Cross. 

Only later, when he was intro- 
duced, did the boys learn who their 
speaker was. He had come because 
he knew these boys, confined behind 
barbed wire in a sheriff's detention 
center, needed Jesus Christ as friend 
and Savior. But he didn't preach. 
He just told them about his own 
troubled youth; how, at 15, he had 
gone to work in an Ohio coal mine 
to support his widowed mother and 
five sisters. He told how Christ had 
come into his life and had guided 
it ever since. It was a simple, con- 
versational message, yet none of the 
boys stirred. Later the Protestant 
chaplain reported that as a direct 
result of the talk 37 of the 63 boys 
had come to him for counseling. 

No doubt it had helped the Rev. 
George Bennard to be identified that 
day as author of the boys' favorite 
hymn, one which pollsters still report 
is America's favorite by a wide 
margin. But although he wrote this 
and more than 350 other sacred 
songs, Mr. Bennard always con- 
sidered hymn writing secondary to 



52 



his ministry as a preacher-evangelist. 
"Saving souls is my greatest thrill," 
he used to say. "That hymn's just 
runner-up." For well over half a 
century he traveled America, preach- 
ing in all but two of the 48 states. 
It was a hard life, and the material 
rewards were few. But it was his 
way of serving his Master. 

As a young man, George Bennard 
had joined the Salvation Army and 
later led a brigade which traveled 
throughout the Midwest. Not until 
1913, when he was 40 and a Meth- 
odist minister, was he inspired to 
write his best-known hymn. As he 
later described the experience: 

"I was studying about the cross, 
seeing it central in Christianity, 
when I remembered an old wooden 
cross I once had seen. The first 10 
words suddenly came to me: 'On a 
hill far away stood an old rugged 
cross.' It must have been two weeks 
before I went back and finished it." 

Though his hymn won interna- 
tional fame, George Bennard faith- 
fully — and with little recognition — 
continued his itinerant ministry. He 
never really retired; he was past 80 
when he accepted the opportunity 
to witness before the delinquent 
boys. He and his wife did, however, 
settle in a modest home in the Mich- 
igan hamlet of Ashton, near Reed 
City. Tn front of that dwelling, the 
Reed City Chamber of Commerce 
erected a rustic wooden cross which, 
much as a similar one had four 
decades earlier, inspired him to 
write his last hymn in 1956. 

Last October, at 85, George Ben- 
nard was called to the heavenly 
"home far away" he described in 
song. But the simple cross in front 
of his last earthly home remains as 
a symbol of the hymn which ex- 
tended the ministry of a humble, 
dedicated evangelist to all corners of 
the globe. 



servers — all with generous samplings. 
The part that should interest most 
Together readers is a letter written 
to William Clark (of Lewis and Clark 
lame) in 1827 by Jedediah Strong 
Smith. Young Smith was of New Eng- 
land stock, "a devout Methodist," and 
has a secure place in history as the first 
American to cross overland to Cali- 
fornia. Gradually scholars are bringing 
his career to light, and a Jedediah 
Smith Society has been formed at 
Methodist-related College of the Pacif- 
ic, Stockton, Calif., to hasten the 
process. 

I do confess that when I first saw 
the dust jacket of The Day 1 Was 
Proudest to be an American (Double- 
day, $3.95), into my mind flashed those 
wartime movies which end with the 
Stars and Stripes rippling before a 
glorious sunset. "Ho hum," I said to 
myself as I started to flip the pages. 

Then I stopped — to read. There's 
little chest beating or backslapping 
here — just simple tales by or about 
Americans. Editor Donald Robinson's 
collection of 68 short articles reveals 
the pride, spirit, and humanity of 
Americans great and small, from movie 
stars, senators, and labor leaders to 
schoolteachers and a couple of army 
privates. 

Why should we be proud of our 
country? Robinson answers well. With 
pleasant restraint, he unearthed not so 
much reasons as examples why each of 
us can be properly proud of being 
Americans. 

Few comic strips in recent years have 
won fans as Charles M. Schulz' Pea- 
nuts has done. Schulz, an active 
Protestant layman who tithes, teaches 
Sunday school, and takes a leading part 
in his church's activities, has a magic 
touch: the mirror he holds up to 
the problems and frustrations of 
modern life reflects no hint of bitterness 
or defeat. 

All this is by way of introduction to 
the fact that the fourth in his series of 
Peanuts books now has been published. 
It's Snoopy (Rinehart, $1), and, of 
course, features the antics of the pooch 
who plays such a big role in the daily 
cartoon strips. 

If you're already a Peanuts fan, this 
book is surely for you. If you're not, 
it probably will convert you. 

Books hot from the crucible of ex- 
perience often write themselves. But 
it takes a hand guided by soundness 
of purpose and mind to give a book 
that extra something that spells the 
difference between good and excellent. 
Stride Toward freedom by Martin 
Luther King, Jr. (Harper, $2.95) has 
more; it has, I believe, enough to be- 
come a Christian classic. 

A Baptist minister in Montgomery, 

TogetheivJanuary 1959 



CHOOSE FOR YOURSELF OR FAMILY THIS NEW YEAR 

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The Perfect Bible for The Teacher . . . 
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Teachers, this is the Bible you can use in your teaching — 
u deluxe concordance Bible. This Bible is written in the 
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Atlanta, 72 Broad St., N. W. • Boston, 577 Boylston St. 

Los Angeles, 5244 Santa Monica Blvd. • Nashville, 417 Church Street 



January 1959\Together 



53 



FOR ALL 
PARENTS 

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McGUFFEY'S READERS 

After a long and costly search, reprints of the original 
1 ST!) revised editions of the famous McGuffey's Headers 
have lieen completed and you can now purchase exact 
copies at the following low prices POSTPAID: 

1st Reader $2.25 4th Reader $3.25 

2nd Reader $2.50 5th Reader $3.50 

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Ala., Dr. King has become one of the 
strongest of the Negro leaders in the 
struggle for civil rights. And he is 
barely past 30. 

In 1955 he led 50,000 "tired, poor 
and untutored" souls in a boycott of 
city busses in protest against segre- 
gated seating. His book is an account 
of that boycott and the people who 
walked to work and home again as 
much as 12 weary miles a day for more 
than a year. 

George Bernard Shaw never pub- 
lished his one-act plays in a single 
volume. But now Seven One-Act Plays 
by the great Irish dramatist (Penguin, 
65(j) appear in a paperback book along 
with the prefaces and introductions 
Shaw wrote for them. 

Looked at one by one, these plays 
appear slight. Together, however, they 
give a quick impression of the range 
and versatility of Shaw's genius. 

The collection will be particularly 
interesting to amateur performers who 
have the courage to tackle their Shavian 
rhythms and vitality of speech — and 
should make good reading-at-home 
material for families. 

Users of words — and aren't we all? 
— will find an important new key to the 
rich resources of the English language 
in The Comprehensive Word Guide 
by Norman Lewis (Doubleday, 
$5.95). 

The Word Guide will help you even 
if you don't have a specific word in 
mind for which you need a synonym. 
It will even help you if you start with 
only the name of a subject or can think 
of only a single word connected with 
the subject. And, as if that weren't 
stretching things far enough, you can 
even start with a definition and find 
the word you're looking for to fit it! 

Don't ask me how it accomplishes 
these seeming miracles. I can only say 
that they are the result of an ingenious 
arrangement of words in interrelated 
categories, plus an alphabetical index 
devised by the editor, who teaches 
vocabulary building at New York 
University. 

In view of the quadrennial emphasis 
on education, many Methodists will be 
interested in a new paperback with a 
disturbing title — Second-Rate Brains 
(Doubleday, $1.50). 

This is a factual, sometimes frighten- 
ing, report on the dilemma of American 
education by scientists, educators, and 
journalists. Their statements are expert- 
ly tied together by Kermit Lansner, 
general editor of ~Newswee\. 

If you have been wondering if Rus- 
sian scientists are super-robots ... if 
we are educating for extinction . . . 
and what can be done about it, this is 
must reading. And Barnabas knows 
these questions have been wheeling 



around in the minds of many Together 
readers, for articles in two recent issues 
\Methodists Still Start Colleges, Octo- 
ber, page 24, and Why Don't Methodists 
Have Parochial Schools? November, 
page 30] have brought keen responses. 
Now here's another welcome explora- 
tion of our nation's pressing, vital edu- 
cational problems. 

The need to love is as basic as the 
need to eat. It is the outreach of self 
toward completion. 

In Man's First Love (Doubleday, 
$2.95) Methodist clergyman Ralph W. 
Sockman, known to millions through 
his Sunday sermons over NBC's Na- 
tional Radio Pulpit — and author of 
Men to Match Our Missiles [June, page 
10] — writes for "those who are thought- 
ful enough to desire deeper reality in 
their love of God and richer content 
in their other loves." 

Basing his study on the First Com- 
mandment, "You shall love the Lord 
your God with all your heart," . . . 
Dr. Sockman reminds his readers that 
man's first love is due his God, not 
his family, friends, or country, although 
these and other ties will be strengthened 
by his love of God. 

He considers the Second Command- 
ment, "You shall love your neighbor 
as yourself," as an integral part of the 
First, and he shows that we can learn 
to love our enemies through a genuine 
love of God. 

— Barnabas 



A Mother's 
New Year 
Prayer 



O loving Savior, you who took 
The children on your knee, 
Hear now a mother's fervent prayer 
While bells ring merrily 

And happy voices gaily greet 
The little newborn year. 
Hear first my prayer of gratitude 
For loved ones, near and dear, 

And for the blessings granted us; 
And then, Lord, let me pray 
For guidance: make me wise and kind, 
And teach me, day by day, 

To make this house more truly home, 
And help me to instill 
Faith in my children's trusting hearts — 
Desire to do your will. 

And as the clock is striking twelve, 
Dear Lord, I ask again 
For peace for children, everywhere 
In this wide world. Amen. 

— Rowfna Cheney 



54 



Together/January 1959 




THE ENEMY CAMP, by Jerome Weid- 
man (Random House $4.95). 

Anti-Semitism is a subject that can 
be discussed forever and yet never 
be solved to the satisfaction of the 
majority. The truth seems to be that 
nobody can come up with a simple 
analysis or a satisfying solution. Only 
a small minority actually promotes 
this evil spirit and the vast majority 
is opposed to it. Yet, the relationship 
between Jew and Gentile remains for- 
ever a mystery and a puzzle. When a 
first-rate novelist deals with the sub- 
ject intelligently and realistically, he 
is worth reading. This is a fine book. 

At the center of the story there is 
a mixed marriage between a Jewish 
boy and a Gentile girl. Left to them- 
selves, they could handle the problems, 
but from both sides there are pressures 
that have to be resisted. There is an 
anti-Gentilism as well as anti-Semi- 
tism. Out of the conflict there comes 
new light which ought to eliminate 
some of the darkness in the minds 
of both groups. This is the kind of 
interpretation which should do much 
good. At the same time, it is a story 
that will hold your attention from be- 
ginning to end. It is not primarily a 
propaganda novel, though it has some- 
thing to say about our conflicts be- 
cause it takes life seriously. 

I put it at the top of the list this 
month because I wish that every 
Methodist would read it. The liberal 
Jew and the liberal Christian have a 
great deal in common religiously as 
well as culturally. Every time I turn to 
the Old Testament I thank God for 
this gifted, chosen people. 

THE WINE OF LIFE, by Charles Gorham 
(Dial $4.95). 

This is a fictionalized account of 
the life of Balzac. As such, it does not 
go into any deep study of the writer's 
genius and art. It assumes these gifts 
and tells the story of his personal life. 
And brethren, what a story! 

It is hard for Americans with their 
heritage of Puritanism to imagine a 
society like France at the time of 
Balzac. Marriage was a legal affair, 



browsing 
in 




BISHOP, LOS ANGELUS Mil V 
THE METHODIST (III lu II 



but love was usually extramarital and 
no one except an occasional husband 
ever became upset by the loose morals. 
I suppose that genius is open to 
more temptations than the ordinary 
fellow. Certainly one of the tragic 
stories in human nature is the gifted 
man whose personal life becomes such 
a mess. Society often makes more al- 
lowance for its exceptional children, 
but the moral law shows no such gen- 
erosity. So Balzac comes to a very sad 
ending and one cannot help but pity 
him. The great writing is one thing 
we shall appreciate but the author's 
moral failures will cause no rejoicing. 
Only God can judge men of genius 
but at least we can be sure they do 
not escape the wages of sin. In this, 
at least, they are just like ordinary 
folks. 

THE END OF THE ROAD, by John 
Berth (Doubleday $3.95). 

This could belong properly in a 
case-study book of psychological prob- 
lems. I had the feeling from the be- 
ginning to the end that it was an 
analytical approach toward an under- 
standing of a member of the Beat 
Generation. I am not sure that the 
authorities in the field would agree 
that this man is representative of the 
"beatniks" we read so much about. 
But, at least, he represents the empty 
men who have lost their purpose. 

The whole business begins when 
this young college graduate finds him- 
self unable to move. (I once had an 
Official Board chairman like that.) 
He takes treatment from an unusual 
Negro doctor who is both a genius and 
a quack. As a part of his treatment 
he begins to teach at a small college 
and gets mixed up in the married life 
of one of his colleagues. I guess we 
just have to assume that there is a 
vast amount of emotional and spiritual 
sickness in this generation. Certainly, 
the things that people do as reflected 
in a book like this do not indicate 
either health or sanity. To me, it 
seems obvious that the crisis is spirit- 
ual and that the solution has to be 
religious. 



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January 1959\Together 



55 




Together with the SMALL FRY 



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HE DAY of the Food Bazaar 
had finally come. This was the 
day when the best cooks took 
their best foods to Bumble-bee 
Corners. They would take cakes 
and cookies, pies and rolls and 
doughnuts. Judges - would be 
there to cut and taste and decide 
which should win prizes. 

Granny Peterson sighed hap- 
pily as she thought of the prizes 
— lovely cookbooks filled with 
hundreds of recipes. Very early 
that morning, Granny had baked 
a Sunshine cake, fine and spongy 
and golden. Betsy Lou had 
helped with the icing. It was as 
white and fluffy as the snow- 
drifts outside the window. 

Grampy Peterson and Beanie, 
Betsy Lou's big brother, came 
into the house. Their ears were 
red and cold looking and they 
were rubbing their hands. 

"I do declare," said Grampy, 
"that was a bad storm last night. 
The snow is drifted knee deep 
in spots." 

"How will we get Granny's 
beautiful cake to the bazaar?" 
asked Betsy Lou anxiously. 

"Don't worry," said Beanie, 
"I'm sure our car will be able 



to get through the snow." Just 
then, the sound of voices and a 
racing motor caused everyone to 
hurry to the door. In front of the 
house was a car, stuck in the 
snow. A man was trying to push 
it while the lady in the car kept 
the motor running. 

"Come along, Beanie," said 
Grampy. "We'll shovel them 
out." 

"Tell the lady to come in and 
warm herself," called Granny. 

The snowbound lady came into 
the kitchen and Granny poured 



Help Me to Remember 

In the new year ahead, 
dear God, help me to re- 
member that every time 
I share my toys or smile 
or say "thank you," or 
do something without 
being told — even things 
like hanging up my pa- 
jamas or drying dishes 
— then I make someone 
happy. Help me to re- 
member, God, that even 
a child can make a 
happier world by the 
things he does. Amen. 



her a cup of hot chocolate. She 
looked at her beautiful Sunshine 
cake. Should she cut it for her 
visitor ? 

Granny hesitated only a min- 
ute. She remembered that hos- 
pitality meant sharing what one 
had. So she cut a big piece from 
the golden cake and put it on a 
plate in front of the lady. 

"It's Sunshine cake," Granny 
beamed. "I made it this very 
morning." 

Outside, Grampy, Beanie, and 
the snowbound man shoveled 
and shoveled. At last the snow 
was cleared away and the snow- 
bound man's car was able to 
move again. "Come on in and 
warm up a bit before you leave," 
said Grampy. 

In the kitchen, Granny poured 
hot chocolate for everyone and 
gave each person a big piece of 
cake. 

"This is extra-good cake," said 
the snowbound man as soon as 
he had taken a bite. 

"Granny baked it for the ba- 
zaar," said Betsy Lou. "Only 
now. . . ." 

"Shh !" whispered Granny, 
putting a finger to her lips. 



56 



TogetheyJanuary 1959 



Later, as the snowbound lady 
put on her coat, Granny wrapped 
up the last two pieces of Sun- 
shine cake and handed them to 
the lady. "Please take these 
along," she said. "Then you'll 
have something to eat if you be- 
come snowbound again." 

"Thank you," said the lady. 
"You've been very kind to us and 
I have enjoyed visiting with you. 
Now I do hope you'll come to 
the Food Bazaar this afternoon 
— we will be looking forward to 
seeing all of you there." 

Granny and Grampy and Bet- 
sy Lou and Beanie did go to the 
bazaar that afternoon, even 
though they had nothing to 
take. "It will be just as much 
fun watching how happy other 
people are when they win 
prizes," said Granny. 

The judging had already 
started when they arrived at the 
bazaar. Suddenly, Grampy gave 
a gasp of surprise. "Look," he 
whispered, "the snowbound 
lady and man — they're the 
judges!" 

Just then the snowbound lady 
looked up at Granny and smiled. 

By this time the snowbound 
man was giving a speech, thank- 
ing everyone for bringing her 
food to the bazaar. After that 
the prizes were handed out. 
Beanie ancl Betsy Lou felt very 
sad when cookbooks were 
handed to ladies all around 
Granny. 

Then the snowbound man 
cleared his throat and said, 
"We have one more prize — and 
it is extra special. It is a silver 
cake plate. Now as you know, 
food can be beautiful and it can 
be good. It can also be shared. 
Sharing brings joy to others. 
We have with us today a lady 
who baked a Sunshine cake to 
bring to the bazaar. But she gave 
it away. The last two pieces of 
it are here on the table. To this 
lady — G r a n n y Peterson — we 
give the last prize, a prize for 
a cake that was beautiful and 
good — especially because it was 
shared." 

Granny Peterson dimpled and 
blushed, and her heart was 
thumping when she walked up 
to the judges' stand to get her 
prize. 

"Thank you," she beamed. 
"Thank you so much!" 



Plan a Party-Just for Birds! 



No matter where you live, your whole family can have 
fun planning a New Year's party— just for birds! After 
the decorations have been removed from your Christ- 
mas tree, ask Dad to put the tree up outside. Then fix 
some refreshments for hungry birds, put them on the 
tree, and watch the guests arrive. Here are some special 
recipes for bird desserts : 




Orange Basket Specials 

Cut an orange 

in half. Scoop out 

the insides and eat. 

Add handles to the 

empty "baskets," fill 

ivith bread crumbs, 

and. hang them 

on the tree. 




Raisin-Corn Ribbons 

String popcorn 
and raisins. Then 
drape the string on 
the tree. Do not salt or 
butter the popcorn. 
Try not to eat too 
much of the pop- 
corn yourself! 



Peanut Butter Delights 
Fill empty 
walnut shells 
tvith peanut butter. 
Tape little string 
handles on the shells 
and hang the walnuts 
from the limbs of 
the birds' tree. 




Pine Cone Favorites 
Poke small bits 
of suet (beef fat) 
into pine cones. Then 
fasten the cones to 
branches of the tree 
or scatter them on 
the ground near 
the tree. 




January 1959\Together 



Hobby Alley 

Looking for a hobby? Turn your imagination loose. 
These three Methodists have done just that; 

now read on to see what fun they've been having! 



Hobbies, Unlimited! 



M. 



.RS. WILLIAM A. CHURCH has a peculiar hobby 
for an 84-year-old. She likes to dress dolls. But there's 
a big difference between the way she does it and the 
way it might be done by the girls among her 25 (at last 
count) great-grandchildren. She's won national awards 
for the crocheted costumes in which she dresses dolls to 
illustrate well-known nursery rhymes and fairy tales. 

Mrs. Church already was in her 70s and had won blue 
ribbons for crocheted tablecloths when she began looking 
for a new crocheting project. Her 3 daughters and 11 
grandchildren had benefitted from her tablecloth skill. 
Why not pick something that would give extra-special 
pleasure to her great-grandchildren, too? 

That's how the nursery-rhyme dolls began. Mrs. 
Church, who earlier had shifted from knitting to crochet- 
ing because it allowed more versatility, soon discovered 
doll costuming the greatest challenge of all. Each doll 
had to be fitted exactly with colorful clothing and acces- 
sories. But all her painstaking handwork was rewarded 
— her great-grandchildren were enthralled. 

Mrs. Church first entered her dolls in competition six 
years ago at the Vigo County Fair near her Brazil, Ind., 
home. They took top honors there, first prize at the 
Indiana State Fair, and went on to place third in the 
National Crochet Contest. Since then, winning has be- 
come a habit. Her 1957 state-fair exhibit of Jack and the 
Beanstalk (pictured at right), Sleeping Beauty, and 
Beauty and the Beast captured the blue ribbon for toys. 
Last summer her entries in the same fair's contest for 
crocheted doll costumes won both first and third prizes. 

Even now, having created several dozen miniature 
tableaux, this nimbled-fingered hobbyist is busy making 
more. The most recent now are on special exhibit at the 
Swope Art Gallery in nearby Terre Haute. And Mrs. 
Church, an active Methodist for more than 70 years, still 
finds time to teach a women's Sunday-school class and 
participate in WSCS activities. Her secret? "Simple," 
she winks. "I never sit down idle." 



LAST YEAR a Navy chaplain stationed in Puerto 
Rico asked Together readers to contribute "a few table- 
spoons of earth" from "as many locations as possible" 
all over the world [see Letters, December, 1957, page 5]. 



58 




A crochet -clad factf climbs his crocheted beanstal\ 
to show Mrs. Church's prize-winning sliill. 

Chaplain Carpenter uses a map of Palestine 
to pinpoint the source of one of his soil samples. 




Today, Lt. Cdr. Malcolm A. Carpenter is probably the 
only Navy man who never need fear being far from 
good, solid ground. He can take it right along with him! 
At last count, he had gathered soil and rock specimens 
from 232 separate geographic locations in 111 countries 
— plus every U.S. state and territory. 

The idea hatched when Chaplain Carpenter was pre- 
paring a sermon about the catholicity of Christianity and 
its world-wide sharing of beliefs and experiences. He 
wondered why he couldn't gather samples of soil from 
every corner of the globe as material symbols of this 
spirit. Perhaps he could accumulate enough to fill two 
planters which were to go on either side of the altar at 
the Roosevelt Roads Naval Station's new chapel. This 
mixture of soil from many nations, supporting and 
nourishing beautiful flowers, would be symbolic of the 
universality of the Christian faith. 

The big problem was getting the soil samples. But, 
thanks to Together readers and fellow chaplains (he also 
had asked their help in the Methodist chaplain's News- 
letter), Mr. Carpenter soon was deluged. 

"The first sample to reach us by mail," he recalls, 
"was some sandy loam from Texas. The sender felt sure 
that if any Texans were serving here they would feel 
much better knowing there was Texas soil about!" 

Other samples poured in from all over the world. 
Dirt from the top of Mount Sinai (obtained by a helpful 
Navy officer who laboriously scaled the mountain espe- 
cially to get it) ; sand and rock from Seabees in the 
Antarctic for Operation Deepfreeze; water and sand 
from the Euphrates River in the Middle East; earth from 
an Air Force base in Greenland, well inside the Arctic 
Circle; even soil from near the famed Taj Mahal, in 
India — these are among the carefully indexed items in 
Chaplain Carpenter's collection, believed to be one of the 
largest amateur accumulations of its kind in the world. 

And the chaplain? Filling the planters was easy; now 
he's hunting really unusual samples. "It's dirty," he 
confides, "but altogether delightful!" 



YOU COULD HARDLY call it a "model" train. 
The engine is one eighth full size, weighs 1,440 pounds, 
and runs on live steam supplied by a coal-burning boiler. 
And the eight cars it tows carry up to 20 passengers. 

But one thing is clear: this unusual product of a home 



workshop marks Walter S. Johnston as a true railroader 
at heart — even though he's a manufacturing-plant 
manager by profession. It's the culmination of a hobbj 
interest that began years ago when this locomotive 
engineer's son first yearned to have a real whistle-tooting, 
smoke-belching locomotive. That dream has come true 
only in the past 15 years, during which he has built two 
live-steam engines — and, for the larger, more recent one, 
three gondola cars, three flat cars, a tank car, and a 
caboose. Soon he'll add four new boxcars. 

The pride of the "Johnston Line" is the 12-foot locomo- 
tive and tender, an exact-scale replica (l 1 /^ inch per 
foot) of a New York Central Hudson-type engine. Mr. 
Johnston designed, manufactured, and assembled it al- 
most entirely in his well-eejuipped basement shop. He 
needed technical knowledge of steam locomotive oper- 
ation, machine design, pattern making, etc. — and plenty 
of patience, stretched over six years and roughly 3,000 
man-hours. When the engine finally was completed, he 
excitedly fired it up right in his shop. Smoke and steam 
soon had him gasping for air, and big drops of condensa- 
tion hung from the ceiling. But, says Mrs. Johnston, 
the look on his face when the engine worked was well 
worth the expense of redecorating! 

The complete 10-section train is far too big for the 
usual back yard. So Mr. Johnston laid nearly a half 
mile of special 7Yi-incb. track on a friend's Indiana farm. 
When summer comes, the train is moved 30 miles to the 
farm from its off-season "roundhouse" — the Johnston 
home in Blue Island, 111. 

Once it is on the tracks, Mr. Johnston dons overalls 
and an engineer's cap to fuel the tender with coal and 
water, fire up the boiler, oil running gear, and fill 
lubricators. Then, with a shriek of the whistle, a few 
huffs of black smoke, and a rush of live steam, the train 
is under way. Soon the click of wheels indicates 80 miles 
an hour — scale speed. The train brakes to descend a 
grade, rounds a curve, then climbs uphill with the sharp 
bark of its steam exhaust echoing across the fields. 

Up front, astride the engine, Engineer Johnston again 
breathes the delicious lingering aroma of steam, valve 
oil, and coal smoke. Sure, he knows diesels are more 
powerful and more economical than an old-fashioned 
steam engine. But the Johnston Line is strictly for 
pleasure — and that's a dividend it pays every year! 

— Richard C. Underwood 



// really runs on steam, this remarkable exact-scale train built by hobbyist Walter Johnston. That's Walt operating the engine. 




This feature is just too popular- 
we're swamped with requests. Please 

he patient if your listing is missing; 
we hope to he caught up soon ! 



OWt (Jot^HwW 



AMATEUR RADIO: Albert M. Jackson (W70YE), 
3519 S. L St., Tacoma 8, Wash. 

BOOKS: Mrs. Melvin Newland, 3035 E. 18th St., 
National City, Calif, (old Cub and Boy Scout hand- 
books). 

CHESS BY MAIL: Donald A. Foster, Jr., 1821 
Dalloz Rd., Forest Acres, Columbia, S.C.; Larry 
Travis, 305 W. Washington, Paris, III. 

CHURCH BULLETINS: Mrs. G. E. Bonham, 314 
Golconda St., Kingman, Ariz. 

COINS: Doris Day, 8261 Allentown Rd., SE, Wash- 
ington 22, D.C.; Robert Churchill, 729 Greenlawn 
Rd., Ford City, Pa. 

COOKBOOKS: Mrs. M. Lesch, Gucheen, Minn. 

CROCHETINC: Lillian Graves, 2267 S. 7th St., 
Camden 4, N.J. 

CROSSES: Edward A. Illsche, Box 1843, Fort 
Myers, Fla. 

DANCING: Yvonne Endo, 4307 Grove St., Oak- 
land 9, Calif, (ballet, modern, Japanese). 

DOLLS: Mrs. Bruce C. Beck, Box 272, Wilder, 
Ida. (antique pin-cushion); Mrs. Percy Opdyke, 
RD 1, Washington, N.J. (and clowns, making 
them). 

GENEALOGY: Mrs. Samuel C. Veazie, Havelock, 
Iowa (Veazie, Vesy, Veasey, Vaezey, Viggers, 
Brownbridge, Woodard, Hurlbut); Mrs. Helen F. 
Foresythe, R. 1, Bells Hwy., Jackson, Tenn. 
(Oxley, Combs, Miller, Davidson, Blanchard, 
Foresythe, Carter, Crawford, Guest); Charles B. 
Edwards, 6 Rosewood Circle, North Syracuse, 
N.Y. (Edwards, Longstreet, Heaton, McCoy, Bur- 
ner, Martin, Pratt, Polley, Gerard, Brown, Wel- 
chance); Earl M. Perry, Wise, Va. (Meade, Perry, 
Yontz, Peary, Peery); Mrs. Robert M. Templeton, 
Jr., 304 E. 7th, Dewey, Okla. (Van Gundy, Knott, 
Bronk, Best, Lopp, Wisdom); Mrs. 0. K. Evenson, 
145 N. Ashland, Green Bay, Wis. (Rapple, Martin, 
Chapin, Shaw, Palmer). 

Alan Mumbrue, 313 S. Brown St., Paw Paw, 
Mich. (Mumbrue, Jones, Van Anderpin, George, 
Sikes, Sykes, Hurlbut); William Rusler Smith, 
4731 Procter St., Port Arthur, Tex. (Smith, 
Rusler, Russler, Temple, Crane, Brooks, Oates, 
Miller, Cubbison, Barrick, Kirchofer); Mrs. Gladys 
Crutchfield Ferguson, Box 163, Zwolle, La. (Crutch- 
field, Gunn, Ferguson, De Jarnette, Montgomery, 
Wilson, Matlock, Blaine, Richeson); Mrs. Vernon 
Paysinger, 1909 E. Barton, West Memphis, Ark. 
(Whitten, Hopkins); Mrs. John Gorsica, Jr., Box 
30, Beckley, W. Va. (Bruster, Brewster); Mrs. 
Lloyd Kiser, Genesee, Pa. (Lincoln, Benton); Mrs. 
Lowell D. Dorsey, 1133 E. Sandusky St., Findlay, 
Ohio (Dorsey, Bryan, Nelson, Dunlap, Gilbert, 
Debout, Pipes, Haden, Bauer, Bower, Bowers). 

HANDKERCHIEFS: Lyda E. Potter, R. 1, Box 335, 
Ridgefield, Wash, (state); Mrs. M. E. Rogers, 
1934 W. 35th St., Chicago 9, III. (state maps). 

PENNANTS: Neil Wood, 302 N. Main St., 
Towanda, Pa. 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS: Von M. Smith, Box 
415, Fayette, Ohio; Randy Prather, 1810 Pearl 
St., Covington, Ky. (modern jazz); G. K. Singh, 
555 Majith Mandi, Amritsar, India (long-playing 
classical, rock and roll). 

PITCHERS: Mrs. H. L. Woodford, Box 162, 
Sergeant Bluff, Iowa. 

PLAYINC CARDS: Peggy Marie Taylor, 17 E. 
Market St., Newport 4, Del. (with blank backs). 

POETRY: Mrs. Maude Olney, 1134 25th St., Des 
Moines 11, Iowa. 

POST CARDS: Shirley Dalrymple, RR 2, West 
Liberty, Ohio; Charlene Griswold, Walworth Rd., 
Palmyra, N.Y.; Mary Lou Jones, Girdletree Md.; 



Karen Smith, 2827 E. 35th St., Indianapolis, Ind.; 
Carolyn Wadland, 11 Lynde St., MoJrose 76, Mass.; 
Eilene Plumline, 111 Larch Ave., Newport Heights, 
Wilmington 4, Del.; Don Taylor, Jr., 17 E. Market 
St., Newport 4, Del.; A/2c Charles M. Pheasant, 
AF 13539357, 7310th Support Gp., APO 57, New 
York, N.Y. (European); Mrs. G. M. Picked, 3989 
Beechwood Ave., Lynwood, Calif.; Lorie L. Gregory, 
26 Prospect St., Great Neck, L.I., N.Y. 

Julia White, 1157 E. 4th, Pomona, Calif.; Doug 
Cisney, 1354 Pennsylvania Ave., Tyrone, Pa.; 
Max Lyles, 1010 Sycamore St., Carrollton, Ky.; 
Mrs. Edith Shively, 6249 King Ave., Bell, Calif, 
(state maps); Lee Anne Frazier, 120 SW 5th, 
Newton, Kan.; Patsy Hanston, Piney Flats, Tenn. 
(state maps, capitals); Merlyn H. Meyer, Straw- 
berry Point, Iowa; Pencelia Dakan, 104 Smith St., 
Bridgeport, W. Va. (bridges); Sharon White, RR 
1, Decatur, III.; Mrs. Eugen Olson, 247 6th Ave. 
N., South St. Paul, Minn, (churches); Barbara 
Weideman, School of Nursing, Methodist Episcopal 
Hospital, Broad and Wolf Sts., Philadelphia 48, Pa.; 
Barbara Klousia, R. 2, Goldfield, Iowa. 

RUCMAKINC: Mrs. Wesley Rohrcr, Sr., 642 
Elklund Lane, Johnstown, Pa. (braided); Jeannette 
M. Algarva, Box 535, Inspiration Point, Susanville, 
Calif, (hooked and braided). 

SALT & PEPPERS: Mrs. John Hildebrandt, Box 74, 
Whitewater, Kan.; Nancy White, RR 1, Decatur, 
III. 

SCIENCE: Tommy Gerald, 312 California Ave., 
Leland, Miss. 

SCRAPBOOKS: Charles E. Shaver, 972 Broadway, 
Watervliet, N.Y. (of church history). 

SHAVINC MUCS: Michael D. Tozzi, 6 Berrel Ave., 
Trenton 9, N.J. 

STAMPS: Kenton S. Marlin, 551 Grant St., Gary, 
Ind.; Mary L. Hobbs, R. 2, Box 486, Annandale, 
Va.; Charles F. Phillips, Jr., 36 Dana St., Cam- 
bridge 38, Mass.; Robert Dasse, 20 Capitol Ave., 
Meriden, Conn. 

TATTINC: Mrs. Jewel Gault, Box 281, Monitor, 
Wash. 

TOOTHPICK HOLDERS: Mrs. Wilbur Matusick, 
307 D Ave. W., Oskaloosa, Iowa. 




"Now here's one my \ids 
have trouble beating me at!" 



WEAPONS: Rev. Ellis E. Pierce, Box 226, Lisle, 
N.Y. (antique, especially swords, daggers). 

PEN PALS (open to age 18): Florence M. 
Ramsey (14), 4411 Cleveland Ave. S., Canton 7, 
Ohio; Betty Schulz (14), 6576 River Rd., Cincin- 
nati 33, Ohio; Marie DeLand (13), RD 4, Box 135, 
Erie, Pa.; Pat Hardy (15), 204 W. 6th Ave., 
Baltimore 25, Md.; Joan McGehee (14), 106 
Townsend Ave., Baltimore 25, Md.; Sharon Gifford 
(15), RR 2, Plum City, Wis.; Mary Ann Lloyd 
(15), 9208 Sheridan St., Greenwood Forest, Sea- 
brook, Md.; Eione E. Essig (13), RR 1, Box 70, 
Sanborn, Minn.; Marilyn Gudmundson (17), RFD 
2, Ivanhoe, Minn.; Diana Schwarzkopf (12), Clear 
Lake, Minn. 

Judy Miller (14), 709 E. Butler St., Manchester, 
Iowa; Mary Hutchison (14), Prospect St., Man- 
chester, Iowa; Marge Hemphill (16), 2926 7th 
Ave. E., Hibbing, Minn.; Jane Hopson (17), 3004 
Charter Oak Rd., South Ft. Mitchell, Ky.; Louise 
Hall (13), 11028 Littie Dr., St. Louis 23, Mo.; 
Nita Warden (15), 1824 Virginia Ave., Bluefield, 
Va.; Barbara Weideman (18), School of Nursing, 
Methodist Episcopal Hospital, Broad and Wolf 
Sts., Philadelphia 48, Pa.; Sally Jacobson (13), 
316 S. Main St., Paullina, Iowa; Betty Vancie 
(15), Box 128, Yelm, Wash.; Gail Powell (12), 
164 6th Ave., North Troy, N.Y. 

Virginia Halter (11), Waldo, Wis.; David (7), 
Samuel (8), Janet (10), Shirley (12), Wayne (13), 
and Eleanora (14) Smale, RR 1, Box 347, Elkhorn, 
Wis.; Marilyn Strid (10), Box 130, Delmont, 
S.D.; Mike Miller (17), 432 S. 9th St., Miamis- 
burg, Ohio; Patsy Hanston (16), Piney Flats, 
Tenn.; Bill Wright (13), 2415 Rochelle Ave., 
Monrovia, Calif.; Janet Harris (14), R. 1, Gordon, 
Neb.; Joanne Whitaker (13), Box 22, Middle 
Falls, NY.; Joan Winston (14), Box 274, Rio 
Linda, Calif.; Harlene Hutchinson (14), 101 
Nimitz St., Del Paso Heights, Calif.; Diane 
Hostetler (16), Lagro, Ind. Roger Cantrell (15), 
Box 1024, Elm Mott, Tex.; Sally (8) and Mary (11) 
Evans, R. 1, Flint, Tex.; Lou Ellen Dukes (12), RD 
1, Pandora, Ohio. 

Lura Beckwith (12), Malvern, Iowa; Alice 
James (11), 3515 Barcelona, Tampa 9, Fla.; Joyce 
Bearden (15), 20 Queen's Park W., Port of Spain, 
Trinidad, BWI; Tommy Gerald (10), 312 Cali- 
fornia Ave., Leland, Miss.; Juretta Gibson (11), 
Box 344, Edcouch, Tex.; Nancy Ferguson (14), 
Woodland Rd., Ingomor, Pa.; Nancy Jo Gunlack 
(17), Box 221, Fairmont, Neb.; Steven (10) and 
Pamela (12) Fortner, 100 E. Sunset Dr., Mayfield, 
Ky.; Barbara Jean La Tour (14), 221 W. Anoka 
St., Duluth 3, Minn.; Judy DeVasure (11), R. 1, 
Box 95, Tekamah, Neb. 

Sharon Gunsolley (13), 1019 Main St., Platts- 
mouth, Neb.; Christy Mclnturf (15), R. 2, Kim- 
berly, Ida.; Linda Strawn (13), Box 7, Centerburg, 
Ohio; Karen (10) and Sharon (13) Tesch, RR 2, 
Henderson, Minn.; Marilyn Maxwell (14), 1341 S. 
Jackson, Denver 10, Colo.; Jane Rook (17), Spencer, 
Ohio; Phyllis Jones (12), Kirksey, Ky.; Dave Mc- 
Allister (12), 4016 Brown St., Anderson, Ind.; 
Lynn Groves (13), Box 116, Farmington, Calif.; 
Carol Greer (14), Box 58, Princeton, Fla. 

Helen Kay McCallon (12), R. 2, Murray, Ky. 
Barry Simmons (10), 740 Virginia Terrace, Santa 
Paulo, Calif.; Mary Richard Vester (14), Box 217, 
Spring Hope, N.C.; Lucille Shores (13), R. 1, Box 
82, Ulster, Pa.; Pat Greer (11), Box 58, Princeton, 
Fla.; Roberta Zufall (13), Box 117, Monitor, Wash.; 
Jean Dillon (15), 14561 Auburndale Ave., Livonia, 
Mich.; Claire Smith (14), 625 S. 1st St., Pulaski, 
Tenn.; Diane (12) and Susanne (12) Friderici, 228 
W. Central Ave., Camden, Ohio. 

Linda Hutchins (12), Box 183, Snoqualmie, 
Wash.; Fred Ranney (9), Alberton, Mont.; Connie 
Rancourt (12), Box 188, Alberton, Mont.; Charlotte 
Salminen (12), 725 Missoula Ave., Butte, Mont.; 
Doris Ranney (14), Alberton, Mont.; Stephen L. 
Hartsock (9), RD 1, Duncansville, Pa.; Christi 
Kellner (9), 413 N. Thomas, Fremont, Neb.; Linda 
Marvel (14), R. 1A, Dufur, Ore.; Verlynn Tobie 
(15), Box 162, Dufur, Ore.; Karen Guge (15), 659 
Walnut Ave., Elgin III.; Margaret (11), Colleen 
(13), and Collette (13) Stacey, Spencer, S.C. 



60 



TogetherTJanuary 1959 



Typical of Wesley Foundation choirs in scores 

of U.S. colleges, this group puts Christian service into 



£2/ VERY YEAR for the last 10 years, when the promise 
of Easter comes to the land, a student choir from the 
Wesley Foundation at Ohio University takes the road 
out of Athens. Once again this year these boys and 
girls will devote spring vacations to proclaiming in music 
the immortal story of the Resurrection. This picture story 
of last year's tour was developed by an alumnus, John 
Alter, Jr. 

Such choirs are integral parts of many of the 162 
Wesley Foundations in U.S. colleges and universities. 
Organized and directed by students, they afford thou- 
sands of young people a chance to grow in Christian 



Melody 

and 



Up and down the 

state and over into 

West Virginia, 

Ohio University's 

5 5 -voice choir visited 

schools and churches, 

gave nine concerts 

in five days on 

one tour. 



January 1959\Together 



Mileage 




Merrily the time and the miles roll away . . . 




Piling into eight private automobiles and a station wagon, the student-choir 
members chip in to buy gasoline, pac\ box lunches of sandwiches and deviled 
eggs, help to load and unload 55 robes hauled in the rear of the station wagon. 



leadership and musical competence. 

Choir trips can be fun, as these 
pictures show. But they are only a 
part of Methodism's over-all Wesley 
Foundation program, which is train- 
ing thousands of students for future 
service in our church. 

In Athens, the Wesley choir serves 
once a month at both Sunday-morn- 
ing services of the First Methodist 
Church. It frequently contributes, 
too, to campus religious programs for 
Ohio University's 7,000 students. The 
Rev. J. G. Koontz, pastor, says the 
250 members of Wesley Foundation 
at Ohio make up "an invaluable part 
of our church program, in addition 
to providing a splendid choir." 




// you're traveling on a shoestring, 
you are fortunate to be able to sing 
for your supper, lunch, and breakfast, 
too. That is exactly what happened — 
with results pleasing to all concerned. 



Colored baby chicks in a crowded store 
halt three girls who ta\e advantage of 
free time to shop in Huntington, W.Va. 
While there, the singers appeared on a 
special pre-Easter television program. 



62 



i 




When college girls get together anywhere, on tour or in 
dormitories, a midnight session is in order. That's what is 
going on here as some of the singers prepare for bed. 



Divided into small groups, the students spend each night 
in a different home as guests of Methodist families. De- 
spite the busy schedule, most manage with little sleep. 





A church bench is no bed of roses, but 
it provides sweet repose between per- 
formances for this Wesley singer, who 
vows he'll hit the hay earlier tonight. 
Yes, he made the same vow last night! 



63 



. . . to a sunrise service, trail's end. 



Praying together before each performance, the students 
express the real purpose of their organization and the 
reason for their annual pre-Easter tour. "We are here," says 



their director, Burdette Smythe, "to present Christ's life 
and the ideals of Christian living in music . . . to live as 
nearly as possible the life of Him whose praises we sing." 




of the world parish 



WANTED: WAY TO END HATE BOMBINGS 



A sudden outbreak of bombings 
and threats leveled at synagogues, 
churches, and schools is causing con- 
cern among church and government 
leaders. 

Protestants and Catholics have 
joined Jews in deploring the attacks 
on synagogues, the hardest hit targets. 
Bombing of the Reform Jewish 
Temple in Atlanta, Ga., causing $200,- 
000 damage, set off an outbreak of 
anti-Semitic incidents in Peoria, 111., 
Brooklyn, Minneapolis, Morristown, 
N.J., and elsewhere. Attacks on 
churches and schools followed, includ- 
ing a bomb threat that caused cancella- 
tion of a Sunday worship service at 
Trinity Methodist Church, Miami. 

An Atlanta Methodist pastor, Dr. 
Dow Kirkpatrick of St. Mark Church, 
said, "There is no neutral ground in 
days like these. Either we daily foster 
a climate which makes acts of violence 
possible, or we choose to be known as 
men of love and brotherhood." 

Dr. Lewis Webster Jones, president 
of the National Conference of Chris- 
tians and Jews, condemned the Atlanta 
attack as "as much an affront to Prot- 
estants and Catholics as to Jews." 

A Jehovah's Witnesses' meeting place 
in Boston suffered a hand-grenade 
blast. New York's famed St. Patrick's 
Cathedral (Roman Catholic) was 
searched twice in one day after bomb 
warnings. A similar warning caused 
cancellation of a service at a Unitarian 
church in Arlington, Va., where a rabbi 
was scheduled to speak. 

The situation prompted syndicated 
columnist Inez Robb to ask who will 
be next: "Baptists? Vegetarians? Per- 
sons with freckles?" And President 
Eisenhower said the violence must hor- 
rify all freedom-loving Americans. 

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover an- 
nounced a series of conferences to 
acquaint state and local authorities 
with the availability of federal services. 
Meanwhile, Justice and Post Office 
Department leaders discussed means to 
combat a new flurry of "hate" publica- 
tions. 

Governors are acting, too. Gov. 
Dennis J. Roberts proclaimed Emer- 
gency Brotherhood . Week in Rhode 
Island, and Gov. Orville Freeman called 
for a Bricks for Brotherhood drive in 
Minnesota in which school children 



would give soft-drink money to "buy 
bricks" for a Clinton, Tenn., school 
destroyed by terrorists. 

Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin of Mary- 
land described the synagogue dynamit- 
ings as "a sort of left-handed tribute to 
Judaism's rising importance." 

Oldsters Want Activity 

"Older persons don't want to live 
'where it's peaceful in the country,' " 
Dr. John V. Madison, superintendent 
of Jenkins Memorial Home, declared 
at services formally opening the new 
home for retired persons in the heart 
of Watertown, S.D. He points out that 
the home is within two blocks of 
churches, stores, the high school, court- 
house, auditorium, and post office. 

The Methodist Board of Hospitals 
and Homes also feels accessibility to 
centers of activity is important for aging 
persons. All 84 Board-related homes for 
older persons are either in such centers 
or near transportation to them, officials 
report. 

Favor Taxes on Schools 

Tax exemption for parochial and 
private schools below college level is 
being hit by Dr. Tully C. Knoles, Col- 
lege of the Pacific chancellor. He says 
exemption is a subsidy; he favors re- 
imposing property taxes. 

More than 90 per cent of the schools 
that would be affected are Catholic, he 
explains. 

The American Lutheran Church, at 
its convention in San Antonio, Tex., 
also has gone on record opposing tax 
support for parochial schools. [See Why 
Don't Methodists Have Parochial 
Schools? November, 1958, page 30.] 

Japan's 'Lost Generation' 

Christians now are tackling a big 
job. They're trying to reach Japanese 
youths, who are seeking deeper mean- 
ing for their lives while engulfed in 
secular ideologies. 

Dr. Gerald B. Harvey, field consult- 
ant for the Joint Committee on Chris- 
tian Education in Foreign Fields, 
recently returned from Asia with a 
report that the greatest threat to 
Japanese youths is not knowing what 
to believe. Other travelers have made 
similar findings. 




Dr. Lockmiller 



Japanese young people. Dr. Harvey 
said, are confronted with situations 
that confuse them to the point of 
"lostness": A decline of significance in 
Buddhism and Shintoism, a competi- 
tive economic system that leaves little 
place for spiritual values, exposure to 
Western materialism, and near worship 
of science. 

One focal spot for youth work is a 
Christian student center in a university 
community in Toyko. It is directed by 
Methodist missionaries David and 
Betty Swain and a young Japanese 
pastor. 

New Ohio Wesleyan President 

New president of Ohio Wesleyan 
University is Dr. David A. Lockmiller, 
president of the University of Chatta- 
nooga since 1942. He succeeds Dr. Ar- 
thur S. Flemming, 
now U.S. Secre- 
tary of Health, 
Education, and 
Welfare. 

Dr. Lockmiller, 
an active Method- 
ist, is the 10th 
president of the 
116-year-old Meth- 
odist-related 
school in Dela- 
ware, Ohio. He 
holds degrees from 

Emory and Cumberland Universities 
and the University of North Carolina. 
He practiced law five years before enter- 
ing the field of higher education. 

His travels have included visits to 
universities in Europe, Asia, and Africa. 
Last summer he toured schools in South 
Africa. In 1953 he represented the State 
Department on visits to universities in 
Japan, Hong Kong, Formosa, Thailand, 
and India. 

January: Big Month for Boards 

Four major Methodist boards will 
hold annual meetings in January. Fac- 
ing members will be thorny business 
matters, plus some colorful special 
events : 

Board of Missions will convene at 
scenic Buck Hill Falls, in Pennsylvania's 
Pocono Mountains, January 9-24. Some 
700 are expected to attend separate 
sessions of the Division of World Mis- 
sions, Division of National Missions, 
and Woman's Division of Christian 
Service, plus joint meetings. A climax 
will be the commissioning of mission- 
aries in a formal evening service. 

Board of Education will have its 
business sessions in Kansas City, Mo., 
January 12-14. Some major problems of 
higher education will be thrashed out 
at a preceding meeting (January 8-10) 
of the Commission on Christian Higher 
Education and the National Association 
of Methodist Schools and Colleges. Col- 



January 1959\Together 



65 








KMETHODIST!\ ALMANACK 1 

A Miscellaney of Dates 6 Divers Interesting Matters _= 
for People Called Methodist 

Have you somewhat to do tomorrow, 
do it today — B. Franklin 





JANUARY katk XXXI days 

Tke year is going, let him go; 
Ring out the false, ring in the true 

Ireland united with G.B., 1801 

Garnet is January's birthstone 

A good tvife makes a good husband 

(Uouenatrl J^mtbag MM 

George Washington Carver d. 1943 

Put on your '59 license plates 

Ike agrees to run, 1952 

Woodhouse Grove School opens in 

England for Methodist "PKs," 1812 
MacArthur back in Philippines, 1945 
Kansas City is host to conf. Methodist 

Theological Schools Assoc. 
Buffalo Bill (Wm, F. Cody) d. 1917 
Everyone thinks his sack heaviest 
Thos. Jefferson, et al., draw up Virginia 

religious liberty law, 1777 
Albert Schweitzer is 84 today 
Donkey made Dem. party symbol, 1870 
Civil Service Act adopted, 1883 
Benj. Franklin b. 1706 
Publish Tyndale's "Pentateuch," 1530 
Bishop Coke arrives Jamaica, 1789 
Too much humility is a pride 
Confed. Gen. Jackson b. 1824 "See, there 

is Jackson, standing like a stone-wall." 
Francis Bacon b. 1561 
Fletcher Christian scuttles Bounty 

at Pitcairn. Found in 1957 
N. T. Yankees sold for $3 million, 1945 
plorlb jierlrice Jiimbay 
A day holds more than 24 hours 
Methodist Board of Hospitals and Homes 

annual meeting St. Louis 
Sir Francis Drake d. 1596 
Wm. McKinley, 25th president, b. 1843 

He was a Methodist 
Gandhi killed in Delhi, 1948 
1st U.S. satellite in orbit, 1957 

425 Yi sec. to critical 300-mile altitude 



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DISCOVERY 

Year by year, more and more of the vJorld 
gets disenchanted. Even the icy privacy of 
the Arctic and Antarctic Circles is invaded. 
We have played Jack Horner with our Earth, 
till there is never a plum left in it. 

— James Russell Lowell 



1st Month 

Tennyson 

■ "And the covenant 
which I have made on 
earth, let it be ratified in 
heaven." Wesley urged 
Methodists to renew 
covenant with God. Held 
first service in 1755 at 
Spitalfields, England, 
issued pamphlet 1780. 







■ "We are all sick people 
here," commenced 46 
years of humble service 
in famine and disease- 
ridden African jungle. 
This Alsatian parson's 
son left a brilliant career 
as organist at 30 to study 
medicine. Paris Mission- 
ary Society declined his 
offer to serve free because 
of his unorthodox theo- 
logical views. He pledged 
to be "silent as a carp," 
have no part in preach- 
ing, and equip a hospital 
himself. Permit was 
grudgingly given (provid- 
ed he didi nothing to of- 
fend missionaries in the 
field). He declares "rev- 
erence for life" as key to 
universe and man; his 
philosophy includes all 
that lives. [See full-color 
pictorial, ' 'My Visit With 
Albert Schweitzer,"July, 
1957, page 34.] 



66 



lege administrators and church officials 
will review needs of Methodist schools 
faced with mushrooming enrollments 
and will give special consideration to 
finances of 13 Negro colleges. 

Board of Temperance will meet 
in Washington, D.C., January 28-30. 
Members will entertain congressmen 
from their home states at a breakfast, 
followed by an address on "Christian 
Witness Through Legislation" by Dr. 
Ernest Griffith, dean of the new School 
of International Service at American 
University. In another session, an 
analysis of Methodism's historic posi- 
tions on temperance and public morals 
will be presented by a committee 
headed by Bishop Nolan B. Harmon of 
Charlotte, N.C. 

Board of Hospitals and Homes 
will assemble in St. Louis, Mo., January 
27. The day-long business session will 
be followed by a two-day convention 
of the National Association of Meth- 
odist Hospitals and Homes, expected 
to draw 750 participants. Miss Method- 
ist Student Nurse, outstanding senior 
chosen from candidates submitted by 
Methodist schools of nursing, will be 
presented, and names will be added to 
the Methodist Hall of Fame in Philan- 
thropy, honoring outstanding donors 
of time and money to Methodist hospi- 
tals and homes. 

Missions: A Clearer Look? 

Most Methodists probably have a 
vague or erroneous idea of the work 
of Christian missions. That's the view 
of the Rev. Horace W. Williams, execu- 
tive secretary, Interboard Committee 
on Missionary Education. 

He told the Committee this situation 
was brought home to him this summer 
when, traveling in Asia, he encountered 
American Methodists who were sur- 
prised at what they were learning on 
the scene about missions. Personal con- 
tacts and field trips in the U.S. also 
have shown, he declared, that many 
church people have an inaccurate pic- 
ture of mission work. 

He recommended that the committee 
work with other Methodist agencies to 
extend missionary education. 

Hits 'Status Quo' Thinking 

If nations of the West appear to sup- 
port imperialism or defend the status 
quo, they can be beaten "without a 
chance to use our colossal armaments." 

Dr. Herbert Butterfield, prominent 
historian, sounded this warning in a 
series of four talks at the opening of 
American University's School of Inter- 
national Service and Wesley Theological 
Seminary. 

Dr. Butterfield is Cambridge Univer- 
sity's vice-chancellor and professor of 
modern history. Other points he 
stressed : 

• Those who exercise violence may 

Together/january 1959 



De trying to make the world aware that 
they are being oppressed. 

• The West should face the new 
world with intellectual audacity. 

• The world needs another "crea- 
tive experience" such as that which 
came about at one time in Protestant- 
Catholic relations. 

Those who merely defend the status 
quo, he asserted, may be more repre- 
hensible from the positions they hold 
and the possessions they have than the 
victims who resort to violence. They 
also have veto power, he added, and 
can refuse concessions unless there is 
some threat by the victim. 

Dr. Butterfield said such issues now 
are being settled by means short of 
war. The West, he added, should be 
more eager than the Russians to pro- 
duce changes; it should seek to change 
the world, not have changes forced on 
it. 

Science and technology are breaking 
down many old ideas, he continued, 
and as new nations take command of 
their own fate, Christianity must com- 
pete with many creeds and ideologies. 
He decried reliance on fear to achieve 
goals, warning that by making monsters 
of their enemies, people help produce 
a situation in which their own worst 
prophecies are almost bound to come 
true. Escape from today's worsening 
problems, he concluded, is possible only 
by an unusual assertion of the human 
spirit. 

Publishing House Serves . . . 

More than 4.7 million books were 
produced by the Methodist Publishing 
House last year to serve wide areas of 
church people's interests, the Board of 
Publication was told at its annual meet- 
ing in New York. 

Abingdon Press, the book division, 
issued 81 new titles. Ten Abingdon 
books were honored for special merit in 
the publishing field. A children's 
volume, Armed With Courage, received 
the Thomas Alva Edison award as the 
best character-building book published 
in 1958. 

The Board appropriated $600,000 to 
be distributed to annual conferences 
for the benefit of retired ministers, 
bringing to $17 million the amount 
given for this cause in the 170 years 
of MPH service. 

Lovick Pierce, president and pub- 
lisher, announced that sales came to 
$24.4 million — an increase of $1.6 mil- 
lion over the previous year. 

Together realized a 14 per cent 
circulation increase, with 93 per cent of 
charter All Family Plan churches re- 
newing for another year. More than 
8,000 churches now use the plan. 

Dr. George M. Curry, former pastor 
of Nighbert Memorial Church, Logan, 
W.Va., was elected an associate pub- 
lisher. 



bishops Reaffirm support 
of Methodist Social Creed 

Methodism's Council of Bishops has 
reaffirmed its belief in the Methodist 
Social Creed, declaring its pronounce- 
ments as applicable to problems of the 
modern social order, national and 
international, as they were when the 
document was written half a century 
ago. 

In a 1,600-word message recognizing 
the semicentennial of the Social Creed, 
the bishops: (1) emphasized their 
earlier support of the Supreme Court 
decision abolishing segregation in public 
schools; (2) deplored the lawlessness 
behind bombings of churches, syna- 
gogues, and schools; (3) urged im- 
provement of family life to combat 
juvenile delinquency; and (4) called 
for a rethinking of the nation's foreign 
policy. 

The Council, composed of all active 
and retired Methodist bishops both in 
this country and overseas, met in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, for its semiannual 
session. 

The Social Creed places the church 
on the side of "equal rights and com- 
plete justice for all men in all stations 
of life," "the principle of conciliation 
and arbitration in industrial dissen- 
sions," "a living wage in every in- 
dustry," and "recognition of the Golden 
Rule as the supreme law of society and 
a sure remedy for social ills." 

"As we celebrate the semicentennial 
of the Social Creed," the Council said, 
"we note that although the types of 
problems have changed, the causes and 
the remedy remain constant. 

"The Church has a message for this 
day as vital and as necessary as that 
of half a century ago. . . ." 

With specific reference to the segrega- 
tion problem, the Council reaffirmed 
the support it gave in 1954 to the 
Supreme Court's desegregation ruling, 
and urged "all our people to accept 
the rulings in good faith." It com- 
mended laymen, pastors, and bishops 
"who have demonstrated Christian 
courage in critical areas." 

"In these days of extreme tensions," 
the message said, "we commend our 
people who, while not always sharing 
the same attitudes on integration, are 
determined to demonstrate in their own 
lives the qualities of understanding, 
tolerance, and brotherhood." 

CD and Churches Confer 

Need of church members to be 
informed on civil defense was stressed 
at a recent briefing for religious editors 
at Civil Defense headquarters, Battle 
Creek, Mich. 

Together was among 21 leading 
periodicals represented. Importance of 
an operational plan in each church to 
protect lives in time of crisis, to care 
for spiritual needs, and to co-operate 



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with the local CD office was empha- 
sized. 

With the church's spiritual role so 
vital, many things can be done by 
organized groups of laymen. Victims 
can be helped to shelter, families re- 
united, church records protected. Nu- 
clear war survivors can expect to be 
in shelters for at least two weeks 
because of radiation, it was said. 

CD officials suggest that each church 
have an organization of laymen, over- 
staffing if possible to assure continuity 
of leadership, and that it have liaison 
with the local or state CD director. 

Dr. Hotter to Head Seminary 

Dr. Don W. Holter has been elected 
president of' the new National Meth- 
odist Theological Seminary, being 
established in Kansas City, Mo. He 
begins work Jan- 
uary 1, and classes 
for first-year stu- 
dents open next 
September. Na- 
tional and the 
Methodist Theo- 
logical School in 
Ohio, at Stratford, 
will bring the 
number of Meth- 
odist theological 
schools to 12. 

The new presi- 
dent has been a professor at Garrett 
Biblical Institute, Evanston, 111., since 
1949. From 1940 to 1945 he was 
president of Union Theological Sem- 
inary in Manila, Philippines, but 
spent the latter half of this period in a 
Japanese internment camp. 

77 Million Methodists 

The Methodist Church should have 
more than 11 million members by 1970, 
says its Department of Statistics. 

Projecting the 5.63 percentage of 
Methodists in total U.S. population to 
other growth areas in the church, it is 
expected that there will be 29,000 
pastors who will be paid $174 million 
in salary, and $97 million in benevo- 
lences, with church assets reaching to 
more than $1.3 billion. 

The church's total membership now 
is placed at 9,691,916. This figure in- 
cludes 27,415 ministers but does not 
include 1,470,697 preparatory members. 

Wanted: Missionaries 

South America wants more mission- 
aries, Dr. George Jones of the Methodist 
Board of Missions reports. Dr. Jones, 
leader of a recent mission to Bolivia, 
Chile, and Peru, said he found no 
antagonism to missionary work there 
and observed, "If the missionary loves 
people and gives himself sacrificially, 
he will get a good response . . ." 



The Methodist Church now has 
about 90,000 members and more than 
16,000 preparatory members in Latin 
America. 

Study Rural Situation 

Where do Methodists stand in their 
over-all work in small towns and rural 
areas ? 

This question is being researched ex- 
tensively in four projects to be pre- 
sented at the Fourth National Method- 
ist Town and Country Conference, 
July 21-24 in Wichita, Kan. There, the 
studies will be used in planning a more 
effective rural program. 

The projects, being developed by 
Methodist theological seminary spe- 
cialists, will determine: 

• Where Methodists stand in their 
actual, as well as professed, beliefs. 

• What organization is being used in 
small-town and rural churches. (One 
pastor serving several churches, use of 
lay preachers, and so on.) 

• How lay leaders are trained for 
these churches. 

• What makes some small-community 
churches more effective than others. 

New Church Growth in China 

The Christian Church in Communist 
China continues to live and grow de- 
spite the fact that denominations have 
lost about a third of their members and 
13 Christian universities and hundreds 
ol schools and hospitals have been 
taken over by the government, the 
Board of Missions has learned. 

However, it adds, an upward trend 
in church membership now is apparent. 
Tien Feng (Heavenly Wind) maga- 
zine, the only official church publica- 
tion, reports 433 baptisms among the 
T'ung, a mountain tribe of Kwangsi 
Province, and other baptisms in scat- 
tered towns. 

The government has not singled out 
Christians for special attack, the Board 
found, but has let congregations keep 
their church buildings and has spon- 
sored national conferences of Chris- 
tian leaders. On the other hand, some 
Christians have been jailed. 

Denominations have not merged, 
but now are a part of the Three Self 
Movement (self-propagating, self-sup- 
porting, self-governing), which is 
guided by a committee set up to pro- 
vide liaison between government and 
churches. This committee has had a 
checkered history. It has accused mis- 
sionaries of being spies and mission 
boards of being agents of U.S. foreign 
policy. But it also has protected 
churches from overzealous lower party 
officials and has tried to interpret to 
the Communists the nature of the 
Christian faith and the purpose of the 
Church. 

What attitude can American Chris- 
tians have with conscience toward 



68 



Together/January 1959 



>■■■■■■■■■ 



MH09HA 



* IHH1.M. L I I U 1 t I 1 1 1 1L 1 1 . 1 IIC IMMIU U11L1 5 

these suggestions: 

• Have sympathy with them, remem- 
bering that Christian fellowship tran- 
scends all barriers. 

• Pray for Chinese Christians. 

• Study and try to understand what 
they have experienced and what they 
feel and say. 

© Remain faithful to the Chinese peo- 
ple, have concern for their welfare no 
matter under what form of govern- 
ment they may be found. 

• Support the churches of Formosa 
and Hong Kong. 

New Age Needs Vital Religion 

Vital religion is needed in the space 
age more than ever before, 10 faculty 
members agreed in a symposium at 
Methodism's Boston University School 
of Theology. Some comments: 

"A religion fit for the coming age 
must be of sterner and more sacrificial 
stuff than the worship of trivialities 
and frivolities of life, the 'peace of 
mind' tranquilizers, and the other 
pseudo-religions in which we are in- 
dulging." — Dr. Nils Ehrenstrom. 

"Man the space traveler, no less than 
man the earthling, will need to be saved 
from greed, self-centeredness, and trust 
in things." — Dr. S. Paul Schilling. 

"As the field of knowledge widens, 
religion becomes more and more vital 
because it remains the centralizing 
area of true value and of psychic-health- 
preserving cultural survival." — Dr. Ed- 
win Prince Booth. 

TV Course Is Popular 

An "astounding" 1,000 persons have 
registered for an hour-long college 
course over a Washington, D.C., TV 
station on "The Life and Teachings of 
Jesus." The sponsors, Methodist-related 
American University, station WMAL- 
TV, and the National Capital Area 
Council of Churches, had expected only 
200 to pay the $2 charge for study 
guides and other material. 

In addition, 100 persons paid $20 



cin.ii iu icccivc lwu nours ol college 
credit. They will write term papers 
and go to the campus for final exami- 
nations. Others had to be turned down 
because the university could not handle 
them. 

Business and Labor Worry 

Not on opposite sides of the bargain- 
ing table, but together in the same cor- 
ner, top representatives of "big" man- 
agement and "big" labor smilingly 
made a common confession at the First 
National Methodist Conference on In- 
dustrial Relations. Yale's Professor E. 
Wight Bakke, speaking for the public, 
put them on the spot with these ques- 
tions: 

Are you leaders really shouldering 
your responsibilities for the future? 
And what kind of future will you hand 
on to teen-agers? Can your deeds make 
good on your promises? 

Isn't it your purpose to make good 
organization men, whether for man- 
agement or labor? What are you doing 
to develop the individuality of people 
in all walks of life? 

What is your attitude on the role of 
government? 

Methodist layman Leon Hickman, 
vice-president of the Aluminum Com- 
pany of America, said: "Lost forever is 
the concept that the individual can 
run his business by himself. . . . Man- 
agement today is responsive to social 
and moral problems, and considers that 
well-paid, well-treated, secure workmen 
are the best investment." 

Lutheran layman Walter P. Reuther, 
vice-president of the AFL-CIO and 
president of the United Automobile 
Workers, commented: "Unions, too, 
are worried about the individual getting 
lost in the shuffle of bigness. ... In 
each generation we have to find a new 
frontier and be rededicated in order to 
give each person opportunity for out- 
ward expression of human emotion." 

These comments, and many others, 
highlighted the final session of a four- 
day conference that featured scholarly 
addresses and nine and a half hours of 




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Central themes discussed were: "The 
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cific Responsibilities of the Church." 

Sponsors were seven Methodist agen- 
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delegates from across the church at- 
tended the sessions. 

Religion Gains on Campuses 

State-university students are becom- 
ing more interested in religion as an 
academic discipline, James A. Lewis, 
vice-president of the University of 
Michigan, told the Association of Gov- 
erning Boards of State Universities and 
Allied Institutions, meeting in La- 
fayette, Ind. 

More courses in religion are being 
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Mr. Lewis also pointed to a shift 
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denominations expand their campus 
student programs. 



Correspondence 
Notes and Envelopes 



AMEN 
CORNER 




As gleaned from 
pastors' sermons 

• Sympathy is two hearts tugging 
at one load. 

Rev. Cm! S. Winten, Oak Park, III. 
(from Miss Maritsa Brown). 

• The best way to put an idea 
across is to wrap it up in a person. 

— Rev. George II. Huber, Nampa, Ida. 
(from Mrs. Alton E. Wagers). 

• There's nothing wrong with 
straining out a gnat. It's just so 
much worse to swallow a camel. 

— Rev. Jackson linn,*. Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa {from Omer .1. Kearney). 

• Many church workers feel that 
when the Lord passed out the truth 
they got most of it. 

— Rev. Wayne Hoehns, Attica, /«»■</ 
(from Mrs. IK. G. Stroud). 

• Character is not so much taught 
as caught. 

— Rev. W. McFerrin Stt>wc, Oklahoma 
City, Okla. (from Mrs. Bessie S. Mi- 
Colgin). 

• It isn't square miles but square 
people that make a nation great. 

— Rev. A. P. Kcast, Creston, Iowa 

(from Mrs. L. J. Camp). 

• Give Cod the advantage of every 
doubt. 

— Rev. Hugh S. Townleg, Saijinaw, 
Mich, (from Harold M. Karls). 



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70 



Togetheiv'January 1959 



A new program to help women of 
the South Sea Islands meet problems 
of the modern world was launched by 
United Church Women, a National 
Council of Churches department, at its 
assembly in Denver, Colo. 

First step was the appointment of 
Miss Marjorie E. T. Stewart of Belfast, 
Ireland, to help train women village 
leaders in the Cook and Solomon 
Islands to assume civic, educational, and 
welfare responsibilities. Miss Stewart 
has worked with indigenous groups in 
many parts of the world. 

Many island women, some even from 
Stone Age cultures, are taking first 
halting steps toward education and 
exercising rights of citizenship, UCW 
leaders explained. They arranged the 
project in co-operation with the South 
Pacific Commission, representing the 
administering governments of the va- 
rious islands. 

In Denver, the women also spoke out 
vigorously for civil and human rights 
legislation, support of the Supreme 
Court, civilian control of outer space, 
increased aid to education, expanded 
world trade, economic development, 
and technical assistance. 

New president is Mrs. William Sale 
Terrell of West Hartford, Conn., leader 
in interdenominational work for 25 
years and a founder of the National 
Council. The only Methodist among 
the officers is Mrs. Wallace N. Streeter 
of Washington, D.C., a vice-president. 

Start St. Croix Mission 

A Methodist church now has been 
organized on St. Croix in the Virgin 
Islands. A building is under construc- 
tion and a program of evangelism and 
social development has been started. 

The ministry, in this newest of 
home-mission fields, is intended to 
reach nearly half of the 12,000 popula- 
tion. Prime target: 4,800 Puerto Ricans 
who have migrated there. 

The Puerto Rico Methodist Confer- 
ence and the Board of Missions are co- 
operating in the effort. 

Emphasis on Vocations 

Local churches will be encouraged to 
establish committees on Christian vo- 
cations in 1959. Behind the drive is the 
Interboard Committee on Christian 
Vocations. 

Dr. Marcus J. Birrell, executive sec- 
retary, reports that few local churches 
have effective vocations committees. 
One major purpose of such committees 
is to guide those who show an interest 
in church careers. 

Want Hymnal Revised 

The Methodist Hymnal, unchanged 
since 1939, may be in for a revision. 
The Commission on Worship recently 
voted to ask the 1960 General Confer- 



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DEPT. 52 SCRANT0N2.PA. 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS are accepted for miscellaneous items of general interest to 
TOGETHER readers such as : Sale of personal property ; Requests for items wanted ; Service offers 
of interest to individuals of local churches ; Help wanted ; Positions wanted ; Hobby materials or ex- 
changes : Houses or camps for rent ; Tours. No Agents wanted or Opportunity for profit advertis- 
ing. Rate: Minimum charge— $10.50 (14 words). 75c each additional word. CLOSING FIVE WEEKS 
IN ADVANCE OF PUBLICATION (loth). For use of "Box No. . . . TOGETHER": add $1.00. 
Address TOGETHER— Classified Dept., 740 N. Rush St., Chicago 11. 

CASH MUST ACCOMPANY ALL ORDERS 



BOOK FOR SALE 



HOBBY MATERIALS 



LOTTERIES. LAWS AND MORALS, by Judge 
Francis Emmett Williams, Retired. Powerful 
indictment of overworld lotteries and official 
inefficiency at Washington. Foreword by 
Missouri Attorney General John M. Dalton. 
Praised bv Bishop Ivan Lee Holt, Editor 
H. H. McGinty. and Dr. Daniel A. Poling. 
338 pages, $5.00. Mail check or money order 
to Vantage Press, Inc., 120 W. 31st St., 
New York 1, N.Y. 



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RELIGIOUS LIBRARIES PURCHASED. Send 
list or request details. Baker Book House, 
Dept. TG, Grand. Rapids 6, Michigan. 



CHURCH BONDS 



MOUNT VERNON METHODIST financing 
$285,000 Sanctuary through Broadway Plan 
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Write Mount Vernon Methodist Church, 805 
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HELP WANTED 



TEACHING IN CHURCH RELATED 
COLLEGE. Male, 35; B.A., B.D., M.A., 
Graduate study. Religion — Sociology. Box T-38, 

TOGETHER. 

RESORTS 

VENICE— ON GULF— FLORIDA. Tourist rooms 
$3 single, $4 double. Mrs. Suter, Venice, 
Box 765. 

_ SPECIALIZED SERVICES 



METHODIST HYMNALS REBOUND. Maroon 
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322 Southwest Blvd., K ansas City, Mo. 

STAMPS 



TRAINED, EXPERIENCED Director Religious 
Education — 850 member Methodist church. 
Building and equipment adequate — state quali- 
fications and salary desired. First Methodist 
Church, Goshen, Indiana. 

HOUSE MOTHER FOR METHODIST Children's 
home. Requirements : Love, Understanding, 
Desire to serve. Salary plus board and 
furnished apartment. Box T-37, TOGETHER. 

REGISTERED NURSES: Good Salary, plus 
maintenance, in comfortable living quarters. 
Social Security, Vacation and Holiday pay, 
accumulative sick leave, group insurance, 
challenging work for Christian nurses. 
MAYNARD MACDOUGALL MEMORIAL 
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DIRECTOR OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION— 
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congregation — salary $4,200. Near American 
University and Washington, D. C. Write Box 
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TOURS 



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January 1959\Together 



71 



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72 



ence to authorize an eight-year study 
leading to revision of the volume. 

A survey of ministers and church 
musicians showed most would like to 
have a new hymnal, the Commission 
reported. 

New Marriage Manuals 

Two new marriage manuals are 
being used by Methodists — In Holy 
Matrimony, for engaged couples, and 
a pastor's manual for premarital coun- 
seling. 

The 143-page In Holy Matrimony 
discusses the wedding ceremony, 
honeymoon, money management, im- 
portance of common interests, sexual 
harmony, plans for children, growth in 
love, and building a Christian home. 
Couples may obtain copies through 
their pastor. 

Thirty-seven consultants worked 
with the Board of Education's Editorial 
Division, which prepared the manuals. 

Late Banker's Advice: Serve 

"Young men, lead lives of service" 
was the ready advice of Methodist Al- 
bert W. Harris, 91, prominent Chicago 
banker and philanthropist who died 
November 9. He was a member of St. 
James Church, whose Harris Hall 
building bears his name as donor. He 
also gave to the Chicago Methodist 
Old People's Home and Wesley 
Memorial Hospital. 

In recent years, Mr. Harris showed 
special interest in the Chicago Boys 
Clubs, to which he gave his 30-acre 
estate at Williams Bay, Wis., for a 
camp site. 

Retain Annulment 

A move to strengthen restrictions on 
divorce and remarriage in the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church has been de- 
feated by the denomination's House of 
Deputies. 

At present, remarriage of divorced 
persons is forbidden unless the former 
marriage has been annulled under 
church law. A bishop may annul a 
marriage if he finds there is an im- 
pediment which existed either prior to 
the wedding or which arose after it 
took place. 

The rejected proposal would have 
made annulment possible only if the 
impediment existed before the mar- 
riage was solemnized. 

Help to Brazil 

An appeal for funds to buy food and 
clothing for some 2 million starving 
persons in Brazil is being made by 
the Service to Refugees of the World 
Council of Churches. 

A drought, worst in 38 years, has 
claimed the lives of several thousands, 
reports the Protestant Confederation of 
Brazil. 



NEWS DIGEST . . . 

ANIMAL WELFARE. Dr. A. Dudley 
Ward, general secretary of the Method- 
ist Board of Social and Economic Rela- 
tions, told the U.S. Humane Society 
that cruelty toward animals, particu- 
larly in slaughterhouses, is "a moral 
issue and a proper field for Christian 
concern." 

AIDS CLOTHING PICKUP. A new 
$8,000 clothing-collection truck with a 
32-foot aluminum trailer is operating 
within a 400-mile radius of St. Louis. 
It was donated by the Evangelical and 
Reformed Church in the interest of 
the United Clothing Appeal. 

METHODISTS IN KOREA. Meth- 
odists, with 345,685, are second in 
number of Christians in South Korea, 
reports the National Council of 
Churches. Presbyterians lead with 
864,262. 

BAR 'SAINTS.' Religious medals, 
miniature saints' statues, and similar 
view-obstructing objects in cars now are 
illegal in the District of Columbia. 

TAKE RETREATS. In four years, 
367 retreats, convocations, and conven- 
tions have been attended at the Armed 
Forces religious retreat house in Berch- 
tesgaden, Germany, by more than 
43,000 U.S. servicemen and their de- 
pendents. 

PREFER ORANGE JUICE. Favor- 
ite drink in the UN diplomats' lounge 
is orange juice, says the Board of Tem- 
perance. The 80 gallons a week con- 
sumed tops all other beverages, includ- 
ing alcoholic drinks. 

MORE ALCOHOLICS. One of 
every 21 U.S. adults now is an alcoholic, 
reports the Board of Temperance. 



PHOTO CREDITS 

Covn — Josef Scaylea-Shostal • 2 — 
Wayne Davis . 15— NATO . 21- 
Bot. & 22-To|i — Don Rutledge-Black 
Star . 85 — Wide World . 28 — 
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76-77 — Gottfried Rainer-Black Star 
. 2nd cover & 118-19-20-21 Top- 
22 Cen. & Bot.,-23-59— George P. 
Miller. 




Together/January 195 



J 




Shopping Together 






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Because the doll 
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the finest mate- 
rials, it's guaran- 
teed against me- 
chanical defects or 

breakage for one year from date of 
sale. If broken, it will be repaired or 
replaced free of charge. Dolly is made 
of cuddly vinyl, 20 inches tall. She is 
daintily dressed in lace-trimmed nylon 
dress and bonnet, has tailored slip, 
panties, shoes, sox. and her own feeding 
bottle. Pink Cross Baby Doll with in- 
surance policy, $9.95. 
House of Granat, Inc., 
139-R Fifth Ave., New York 10, N.Y. 




3-D Cookies — Beat the batter! Start 
the parade — of wonderful animal 
cookies that stand up by themselves! 
Frosting gives them Disney personali- 
ties. Easy-to-bake kangaroo, bunny, 
rooster, and turtle. Fine gifts, party 
favors, bazaar items. Eight plastic cut- 
ters, dough gauge, nylon frosting tube, 
recipes, $1. 

Breeds, 306 Breck Bldg., 
Boston 10, Mass. 



Auto Rescuer — Got no pull when 
your car is stuck? Samaritan motorists 
willingly help if you have this 12-foot 
Tow Pull of heavy nylon webbing. 1 3 4 
inches wide. Safer than pushing. Works 
in snow, mud. sand, ditches. Buckle to 
bumpers. Won't mar finish; lessens 
jerking; impervious to oil, mud; fits 
glove compartment. $3.50. 
Walter Drake, TO-16 Drake Bldg., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 





fe 




Bed Play Tray — Child abed? Mother 
weary, too? Not if the young one has 
this gay toy tray to play with in bed. 
Provides him with hours of constructive 
fun-things-to-do. Has a blackboard. 
pegboard, and coloring space. All toys 
are included. Makes a good food tray. 
It's also fine for bad-weather play. Folds 
for storage. $6.95. 
Toy Tray, Dept. T. Box 665, 
\ I'll- Providence, I\'.J. 




Your Address Labels, 1000 — $1 

ANY MESSAGE UP TO 4 LINES neatly printed in 
black on white, gilt edged gummed paper l'i in. 
long. Packed with 2' 4 inch purse size plastic box 
and padded in books. WE TELL YOU OUR SIZES. Use 
on checks, lunches, books, letters. 1000 for $1 ppd. 
(via air, add 21c) Any S or more orders, 80c each; 
any 10, 75S ea.; any 25 or more, 60< each. Great 
for gifts. Guaranteed. Prompt delivery. Bruce Bolind, 
10 Bolind Bldg., Montrose 28, Calif. Thank you kindly. 






For more gift suggestions 
look back in previous issues. 



ATTRACTIVELY PLATED 

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1000 NAME & ADDRESS LABELS $1 

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If you don't agree this is the buy of the year, 
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LABELS, 134 Jasperson Bldg., Culver City, Calif. 



January 1959\Together 



73 




Proud "Papa" Nausner (right) and Austrian Methodist head Mayr 




Down with the old and on with the new: Members of a 
British Youth Caravan stop in hinz, roll up sleeves, 
put on new wallpaper, and shingle the barracks roof. 




Methodists in Austria 
are few— but they've provided 

a kindergarten to bring 



for 3 ranz 



^JIVEN a white beard, plus that ever-present twinkle in 
his eyes, the Rev. Ernst Nausner could remind you oi 
Santa Claus. But he wears a black spade beard, and a lot 
of kids around Linz, Austria, will always know him as 
"Papa." He's the Methodist minister who built a bright new 
kindergarten out of old refugee barracks and a city dump. 

It isn't a big school, but it cares for thirty children from 
three to six years old — and it is the first school and play- 
ground ever owned and operated by The Methodist Church 
in this war-scarred area of Upper Austria. 

Last summer a traveling member of Together's editorial 
staff visited the kindergarten which is near the Caravan 
Methodist Church where Mr. Nausner has been pastor since 
he arrived as a refugee from Poland shortly after World War 
II. You'd never recognize this smooth, sunny playground, 
once a field of rubble heaped around a deep crater. Now 
there are swings, seesaws, sandboxes, basketball and volley- 
ball courts. The old barracks have been transformed, rooms 
enlarged, newly painted and decorated. There are pictures 
on the walls and in the halls, and an airy note of cheer 
predominates from spotless kitchen to playroom. 

As he conducted his visitor around the school, "Papa" 
Nausner told how he had long been aware of the tragic 
aftermath of the war. Even in 1954, after most refugees had 
been resettled, camps with wooden barracks scarred the 
landscape. Moral standards continued to decline as family 
ties unraveled and poverty forced both parents in many 
families to go to work, if work could be found at all. 
Children — particularly preschool children — suffered from 
lack of proper family life. Many small children in the 
neighborhood roamed the streets and countrysides from early 
morning until late afternoon. 

Why not, Mr. Nausner asked, build a kindergarten de- 
signed to provide rest, moral training, adequate diet and 
healthful recreation for these neglected children? He ap- 
proached Dr. Joseph Paul Bartak, senior member of the 
American Methodist Mission to Austria. 

"We have in our neighborhood a large city dump," he 



Together/January 1959 











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Little Franz, whose mother and 
father both must wor/^ to ma\e ends 
meet, has a safe and happy haven 
during the day at "Papa" Nausner's. 



Less than three years 

ago Franz and Gretchen would 

have been left to roam 

streets, scrounging for themselves 

as best they could. 




began. "Not very impressive, but if we could clean it up and 
fill up the crater..." 

Mr. Nausner's critics, who had seen him do the "impos- 
sible" by building a $40,000 church and parsonage in the 
same neighborhood, declared the minister had finally bitten 
off more than he could swallow when he asked the Austrian 
government to sell him the dump. In the first place, the 
property was valued at $8,000— and the church had no money. 
But when the government offered the dump for only $2,000, 
the Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief responded 
with a check for that amount. 

Now "Papa" Nausner had his city dump— with a big hole 
in the middle. It would take more money, and 500 truck- 



loads of earth to fill the hole. Two years later, however, it was 
filled at a cost of only $60— which represented tips to truck 
drivers who were persuaded to unload in the 20-foot crater 
instead of the nearby river. 

Meanwhile, as the months passed, refugees from a recent 
disastrous flood on the Danube remained housed in the bar- 
racks Mr. Nausner wanted for his kindergarten. He had 
helped place them there himself, and he would be the last 
man in Linz to want them evicted. So he went to the govern- 
ment again, and the government soon had them transferred 
to a new setdement. 

In January, 1956, with work hardly begun, Mr. Nausner 
and his backers were broke again. But Linz firms were per- 



75 




"Kinder, essen ist fertig!" the coo\ calls out. In German 
that means "children, lunch is ready!"— welcome news for 
hard-playing, hungry youngsters in anybody's language. 



Regular rest periods, as 

well as proper food, are part of 

the program. These tots nap 

on tabletop pallets. 



suaded to advance liberal credit for materials. Volunteer 
workers from the congregation moved in to remodel the old 
barracks, to lay new floors, and make furniture. A work 
group of 37 American Methodists took over for three weeks 
that summer. The second Methodist Youth Caravan from the 
North Carolina Conference in two years arrived to plant 
grass, complete gravel walks, and to paint the interior. 

As word spread in the United States, more and more 
church groups began sending donations. When the kinder- 
garten was finalLy dedicated in September, 1956, Mr. Nausner 
had completed a $12,000 project at a cost of about $4,000. 

"The story of the kindergarten's growth reminds one of 
Jesus' parable about the mustard seed" says youthful Emil 
Paul John, a Methodist missionary from the U. S., who also 
played an important part in getting the kindergarten under- 
way. "Those who know Mr. Nausner best learn two things: 
first, that they should call him 'Papa'; second, that he gets 
things done with nothing more or less than the faith which 
Jesus urged his disciples to possess!' 




Prayer at mealtime reflects the moral and religious atmosphere of the school. Here 
neighborhood children find an aid to growth under trained adult supervision and guidance. 



76 



TogetheyJanuary 1959 




"w^m 




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Txpther 



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Together 

740 North Rush Street, Chicago 11, Illinois 
Midmonth magazine for Methodist Families 



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